DR350 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by leonphelps, May 16, 2007.

  1. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

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    That's a neat and versatile solution but I'm stumped as to why you'd want to carry your handgun like that. Surely it's just asking to get dirt in it or to attract the wrong sort of attention (whatever that may be.) Are you planning to put another cover or tank bag over the top or have some other way of carrying it more discreetly? :dunno

    I use a pair of cheap ATV tank panniers to which I eventually added a tie-down strap so they wouldn't flip back into my lap whenever I go over 50 mph (not in the pic below). They have a water bottle holder on the outside and are well enough constructed to keep out dust and mud under normal circumstances, although I wouldn't trust them to keep anything critical dry in a rainstorm or river crossing. They are certainly suitable for carrying a handgun but not in an immediately accessible way
    [​IMG]
  2. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    IIRC in general, turning the "mixture" screw out will make it richer. There is an idle air jet (carb throat) and idle fuel jet (float bowl). These two screwed in jets combine to control the mixture and the screw controls the volume of that mixture that enters the carb throat on the motor side of the butterfly. This mix combines with mostly air that gets by the butterfly. Then the idle speed screw opens the butterfly a little and/or lifts the slide (either with vacume on the CV carbs are mechanically). This adds a little extra air so you can open the idle volume screw for ballance. Adjusting the idle speed and mixture screws together should give the best results. On some bikes (FZ1) there are multiple holes in the bottom of the carb throat, three behind and one in front of the butterfly. The extra holes are there to help with the lean transition (bog) from the idle circuit to the midrange circuit. Kinda like what the accellerator pump does on the pumper carbs.
  3. kaukasion

    kaukasion Adventurer

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    this is a 96 SE what should it idle at rpm range wise? maybe i have the idle to low
  4. devo2002

    devo2002 -Devo

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    Pretty sure that is xt wet weight vs dr dry weight. I don't find it top heavy at all.
  5. rubberband

    rubberband Will ride for tacos

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    should idle around 1500rpm min....
  6. GlennR

    GlennR Playin' in the Fire

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    I don't know. I just google the specs, and usually get the # from motorcycle-usa.com or whatever site comes up.

    The XT225 "feels" really light, but they say my WR450 is only 248 lbs, and it feels heavier than the 225 when I'm stuck or trying to lift & drag it over a log, or when trying to turn around in a tight spot on the side of a steep hill.

    I was always under the impression that the DR350 was quite a bit lighter than the DRZ400S. But if you weighed your bike at over 300 lbs, I guess there isn't much difference. Maybe the Z carries it a lot higher?
  7. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    I weighed mine a couple weeks ago and came up with 300 pounds ('90 dr350s) and 314 pounds ('95 dr350se). That's wet weight but with room for a gallon or two more gas in each.
  8. RuggedExposure

    RuggedExposure Now with more rugged

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    Starting next year I'll be riding this bike as a commuter to work (~50 miles) and 30 miles of that will be ranch roads. Since I'll be riding in a green uniform with a duty belt, I'll aready be standing out. It wont be too noticeable having another pistol on the bike.

    Why do I need two you ask? its nearly impossible to use your left hand to get a pistol on your right side. If the situation presents itself and I need to access a pistol quickly, I'll have one on the tank within quick reach. Plus there are tons of coyotes out here and they make great target practice. :wink:

    I'm not concerned about the pistol getting dirty. We ride ATV's constantly through mud, dirt, dust and rain and never seem to have an issue.

    On the other hand, we do have broken pistols occasionally from ATV wrecks. Here is a pic I took of such an instance:
    [​IMG]
  9. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    I've seen a few references to people putting 5.8 gallon gas tanks from a XR650 on their DR350. It sounds like mounting them isn't a huge issue.

    Does anyone have pics of one of these tanks on their DR? I'm not worried about the mounting, I'm just curious how big it's going to be and if it gets in the way.
  10. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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  11. Greg Bender

    Greg Bender Long timer

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    Incredible! They also list a 50 liter (13+ US gallon) tank at the bottom of that page!!!

    At 6 pounds per gallon of fuel, that is 78 pounds inside the tank when full. Best budget for some stiffer springs, too.

    Gregory Bender
  12. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    That is 50liter of gas + 8 liters of water!
  13. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    Spectacular. Thanks for the link. I think the 5.8 gallon tank is going to be in my future for one of my bikes. It doesn't look much more obtrusive than the 4.25 gallon tank I've got now. Having an extra 1.5 gallons is going to be spectacular for long back-country trips.

    As much as I have no practical reason for one of those huge enduro tanks (15+ gallon?!?!) I still want one. Good thing they're so expensive.
  14. Greg Bender

    Greg Bender Long timer

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    Yep - I'd grab one just for bragging rights if they weren't so expensive. Out here in the west, gas stops can be few and far between....but not far enough to justify a 715 - 910 mile range (thinking 55 to 70 MPG with a 13 gallon tank).

    Regards,

    Gregory Bender
  15. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    And you have to chop the front of your seat off.
  16. kaukasion

    kaukasion Adventurer

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    hey, new rider here, im using this bike to learn to ride on and to get me back and forth to work

    i seem to be doing well so far and picking it up fast
    but im having some issues if any of you have advice
    like in traffic and downshifting it just seems to want to lock up the back tire no matter what i try to do
    is there a trick to it or does it just take getting used to? i try to rev match but most times my revs are still to low lol

    most times i pretty much just clutch in and go down multiple gears instead of stepping down each gear as i slow and because im so nervous for my rear tire to skid and i cross my fingers that when traffic picks back up i have it in the right gear lol
  17. GlennR

    GlennR Playin' in the Fire

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    Sounds like your rear brake needs adjusting or repaired. It should not lock up so easily.
  18. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Sorry if this is to fundamental. It' been a long time sense my first rides. From 6th gear, use engine braking and the rear brake to begin slowing down. Be careful of the front brake until you understand the dynamics. A lot of weight moves to the front under braking, so the front brake has a lot of influence. Any irregular surface, or lack of traction or change in direction on the front tire can dump you. Down shift one gear at a time with a little rear brake and release the clutch with discretion. Engine braking is you friend, but down shifting too a much lower gear can lock up the rear tire on any surface. Practice, Practice, Practice. Carefully.

    If you really want to learn to ride, participate in a Trials club in your area.
  19. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

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    That is a very nice bike!

    I just got the same taillight/turn signal/license plate thing. How do you like yours and anything to be wary of with it?

    Any pics of the extended rack?
  20. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

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    You are probably downshifting at too high rpm. Still, it all takes coordination and practice. Continue trying to perfect your rev matching, be smooooooth with application of all controls, including easing out the clutch after shifts (faster will come with practice).

    If you have not done so already, please consider some training. You might be able to take the MSF BRC on your own bike - and you would definitely be able to take an ERC on it later, once you have built some experience.