DR350 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by leonphelps, May 16, 2007.

  1. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

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    It's a set of rubber "bumpers" that act as cushions between the rear sprocket carrier and the wheel. The idea is that with a thumper (especially big thumpers) the power pulses can hammer transmission gears if there isn't a little give somewhere in the driveline. Dirt bikes don't need cush drives because there's always a little bit of slip between the tire and the dirt, but on pavement the theory is that not having a cush can shorten the bottom end life.
  2. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    A cush drive is a shock absorber for the driveline. My Ducati has it (sprocket bolts are mounted in rubber bushings) as does my BMW boxer (spring loaded bit in the trans).

    Here's a thread:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=411129
  3. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Did not know this. Good thing too cuase in my shopping for side covers I could have bought a dirt version. Can you visualy tell the difference.

    Thanks Greg. What about the lense. Is it glass or plastic. How is the quialty of the reflector. Could I stuff a HID in there? I don't have the stock cluster any more.

    BTW what is the "secret" toggle switch you got going on here for?
    [​IMG]
  4. tntmo

    tntmo Been here awhile

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    What year? The front axle diameter changed in 94 I think.
  5. tntmo

    tntmo Been here awhile

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    Pretty sure they got rid of the cush drive in the later years. It's really not necessary, the DRZ400 never had one.
  6. Greg Bender

    Greg Bender Long timer

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    Glass lens. I tossed up some additional photos here:
    http://thisoldtractor.com/gtbender/dr350.htm#gtb_headlight_and_shroud

    That super secret turbo/nitrous toggle switch is good for 10 extra horsepower ;> :> :> :>

    Actually, a previous owner had installed it in order to switch off the headlight. I left it on there thinking I might need it some day. But, I've never needed it. I just leave the light on all the time.

    If you just want to be legal, the dirt headlight is a fine thing. Very basic functionality in a tough package that will take more than a few crashes to ruin it. But, if you have D/C power with your "S" model, then you could always add some highly functional LED lights. I've been following these two threads, but never installed them on my A/C powered "dirt" model. Now that I have the 1999 SE model, though, a pair of these are likely in my future.
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607184
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=751838

    Speaking of LED lights, I had a few dash indicator bulbs burnt out on my new-to-me machine. Rather than purchase regular old incandescents (at nearly the same price at my local auto parts store), I ordered some of these units. I've fit them to dash on my Moto Guzzi I-Convert and they are quite bright and noticeable even in the Phoenix sunshine (we like it hot and bright around here). I'm expecting the same results with the DR350.
    https://www.superbrightleds.com/mor...bs/74-led-bulb-1-smd-led-wedge-base/227/1062/

    As you probably already know, with LED bulbs you match the color of the LED to the color of the lens.

    Regards,

    Gregory Bender
  7. teddy_kgb

    teddy_kgb Adventurer

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    Oddometer:
    27
    I am looking at the top of the frame tube, just behind the steering head, and there is a 14mm bolt where I would assume the oil fill and dipstick should be. Or am I looking in the wrong place? But when I remove the bolt there is no dipstick.

    I just bought this bike, and now that I'm thinking about it there is an aftermarket product (which I don't know what it is) connected to that bolt. I guess the previous owner removed the stock screw on dealy with dipstick and replaced it with a bolt and left the dipstick out.

    Here are pictures of what I'm talking about:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    What is the "Scotts" device at the top? What are my options to have a dipstick? I would like to be able to check my oil level as it is hot as hell here (105 today) and don't want to be running low on oil.

    Noobie says thanks.
  8. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    Oh hiya
    That is a Scott's steering damper, and is quite a desirable bit if aftermarket kit. I'm sure any inmate here would gladly trade you that get-up for a stock oil filler cap :)

    There is a procedure to check oil on from the bottom end of the motor, but it must be done when cold. A running or warm bike moves oil up into a reservoir in the frame, which is where one would check oil level on a warmed up bike.
  9. markk900

    markk900 Been here awhile

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    the scotts device is a steering damper (a very good quality one too), and presumably to mount it they needed a fixed point on the frame. Under that bolt you will find the dipstick (actually the mounting is pretty ingenious).

    edit: went to the scotts site and they don't list a kit for the DR350, so that bracket is custom made by a PO. Hopefully he put the dipstick rod on the underside of that cap with the slightly rounded off head on it!
  10. smc5735

    smc5735 Adventurer

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    Took a ride today after I fixed some issues. New oil, cleaned filter, and cleaned carb. Much better, here is a picture !


    [​IMG][​IMG]
  11. markk900

    markk900 Been here awhile

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    We're posting at the same time :)

    The procedure to check oil when cold isn't really a good check. You take out the phillips screw down near the bottom of the clutch side, below and to the front of where the kick start is (or would be on e-start).

    If oil does NOT leak out, you don't have enough to safely run the motor....but it doesn't really tell you how much you DO have....
  12. thump!

    thump! Adventurer

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    97 off road
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  13. teddy_kgb

    teddy_kgb Adventurer

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    No, as I mentioned when I remove the bolt there is no dipstick, just a very clean (like stainless steel) threaded bolt. But this is where I put the oil in, correct?

    I'm happy that the bike has a lot of quality after market stuff, but as a new rider I wish the bike was a little more user friendly. :D The guy I bought it from said it has upgraded suspension, a big bore kit and a few other mods, he used to do this big trail ride in new mexico several years.

    But even though the bike is California plated it is missing turn signals, brake lights, speedometer/odometer, non DOT tires, and now to find out a dipstick. It is turning into be a bit of a project bike just to get it legal. Anyway, I guess I'll have to do a bit of learning to get it were I need it.

    Can anyone give me the steps to check the oil level without a dipstick?
  14. markk900

    markk900 Been here awhile

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    Yeah, when I posted I assumed that was a "scott" original bracket and assumed (incorrectly) they wouldn't be so dumb as to leave you without a dipstick.

    I'd probably make a dipstick - do a normal oil change, and fill up with the correct, measured known quantity. Run the bike for a little while, then make a dipstick out of a coat hanger or something similar. Piece of tape to show a known spot, stick it in the open filler hole down to your mark, and pull it out. Whatever it shows is likely to be pretty close to the normal mark so use that as a reference going forward.

    Stock dipstick is pretty much a 6" or 7" straight rod, but none of that matters as long as you have some kind of reference and you use it the same way each time.
  15. thump!

    thump! Adventurer

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    I have a couple in a parts box. You pay shipping ($6) and I'll send you one. PM me if interested.
  16. gladesteen

    gladesteen Padawan

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    May 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    35
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    WOW!

    I need to tell you guys about this.
    If you have a CUSH sprocket setup, you must do this.
    It made a H U G E difference in the way the bike feels on/off throttle.

    Basically you shim either side of the "CUSH" rubber V shaped isolators inside your rear sprocket so it will sit tighter on the wheel. What that does is virtually eliminate any lag on or off throttle.

    Before when i used to let off throttle at say 30mph i would get this lag then JERK like the chain was loose when it engaged to hit the chain/sprocket. It was the gaps on either side of the CUSH rubber!! Now its IMMEDIATE response to get power to wheel either on or off throttle.

    I ended up shimming mine with the plastic box tie straps. Such as the stuff wrapped on a pallet, etc. Its firm / hard plastic. Just cut it into 1" strips and shim either side of your rubber CUSH isolators. The result was incredible! I put one on each side of my CUSH isolator and that enabled a tight match when i installed sprocket to wheel.

    Here's a vid that shows process...same thing, different bike.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wukEZO1cdc

    Hope it helps !

    -Mark
  17. redleger

    redleger Horrible Mechanic

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    Thanks guys. I get smarter everyday I read this.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
  18. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    Just as a note - based on my DR with riser/backset/HDB clamp - the stock dipstick would be a pain to get out with that tab/etc. in the way.


    [​IMG]


    For now, a stick which you dip in will get you started. Longer term, I would get another bolt (perhaps a wingbolt?), drill a hole into the end and press/epoxy a rod into it.

    Do an oil change with carefully measured fresh oil. That's your top mark. I recall about 3/4 inch range on the stock stick.
  19. teeveecasualty

    teeveecasualty n00b

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    Jun 27, 2013
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    Los Angeles
    Thanks for the several good replies.

    Jackanory, this configuration has been working for you? This is how I originally installed it and then rode it for about 10 minutes before the small rubber boot behind the bracket got pulled underneath the bracket and the cable lost all tension. The entire cable housing was pulling forward with the cable. I assumed it was because nothing was holding the housing in place on the back side of the bracket.
  20. hennikerjd

    hennikerjd I am Jack's wasted life

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    That is bizarre, I can't for the life of me figure out how that can be happening. The metal tube has a lip that fits on the front side of the bracket and prevents it from being pulled through the bracket towards the clutch actuating arm. Are you sure you have it mounted correctly?

    If you look at my pic again you can see that lip on one side of the bracket and the rubber seal on the opposite.