DR650SE Index Topic#13- PROBLEMS/FAILURES

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Krusty ..., Nov 11, 2010.

  1. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Sounds like I have another thing to add to my winter Project list. :D
    :thumb
    #81
  2. smilin jack

    smilin jack Grandpa Adventurer

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    #82
  3. rhino_adv

    rhino_adv Gnarly Adventurer

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    I had the same problem with a 2003 DR650 I purchased with 4400 miles. At around 5200 miles the cylinder base gasket started leaking. I power washed the engine and then cleaned the site with contact cleaner and dried it with a heat lamp. I applied a layer of hi temp silicon and allowed it to cure for a week. A year later the bike has 13300 miles and not leaking any oil from the base gasket.
    I recomend this quick fix to anyone with a similar problem!


    Brad
    #83
  4. Chillis

    Chillis Long timer

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    My 1997 had a few issues but it was rode hard but maintained well.

    Over 80,000 miles before parting her out.

    Blew out rear shock
    Starter motor went due to cleaning the bike and not leaning it over to let the puddled water drain from the rubber o-rings of starter motor. It was corroded inside.
    One can chain tensioner after replacing a gasket and stripping out the threads for the bolt in the end.
    Rear brake caliper bracket broke while I was doing a set of rear brakes.
    A few Teflon chain guides.
    One speedometer.
    I had a chain come off a knock a hole in my case.
    Base gasket leaked eventually.

    I think that was about it. Considering I rode a lot of high speed wheelies, topped it out often, rode desert, street, toured across the country a few timed, it acquitted itself very well.

    Should I get another I could make it last indefinitely. I don't care to go as fast and the wheelie hormone seems to be in check.

    Excellent machine.
    #84
  5. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rob.G View Post
    A lot of people strip those screws... they're actually not philips. They're a Japanese "standard" (I forget the exact term)... but if you look closely, they aren't tapered like a true philips.. the slots go all the way down completely. There's a special tool you can get to remove them, but it sounds like you already solved the problem. :)

    Rob

    -----------------------

    JIS screwdrivers - http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcyc...-screwdrivers/
    http://www.amazon.com/Hozan-JIS-4-JI.../dp/B005NIY3PM

    the special tool for most is using a hand-hammer impact tool.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/impact-...ase-37530.html
    http://www.sears.com/craftsman-impac...p-00947641000P
    http://www.harborfreight.com/7-piece-reversible-impact-driver-set-93481.html - light duty one for smaller fasteners.
    i've used a dremel tool in the past with a thin cutoff wheel and made a slot for a flathead screwdriver to work.

    later found out the trick, if you only have Philips screwdrivers, is to use the next size smaller one (so it gets the tip down in deeper in the JIS screw) and tap it from the top with a hammer. this helps drive the tool head deeper into the screw and also shocks the screw some to loosen it. if the screw is somewhat buggered up, from previous attempts, tapping the screwdriver in harder can work. often the steel screw, alum. cap & brake res. main body somewhat fuse together if the fluid has never been serviced.

    here is a way to modify Philips bits/screwdrivers to fit better in JIS:
    http://www.kzrider.com/forum/21-tools/532335-budget-jis-screwdriver-tips

    when dealing with the JIS screws on the floatbowl, the same technique can be used but often those hand-hammered tools is key. that is 1 essential tool that every home mechanic should have! once you have those screws out replace with allen bolts from PC, Jesse or the hardware store.
    #85
  6. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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  7. bobzilla

    bobzilla Dirty Old Man

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    Is there any down side to completely removing the nuteral switch? I have ridden dirt bikes my whole life and dont need a switch to tell me its in gear or not.:lol3
    #87
  8. Toscana1

    Toscana1 Younger by the ride.

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    Any guidance to a good tutorial on replacing the problematic '98-'99 torque limiter. One that shows from start to finish hopefully? I've read tons of posts, stories, etc. on ADV, ThumperTalk and DRRiders but haven't been able to find a step-by-step on how to do the upgrade. Any links would be appreciated, thanks.
    #88
    TaterHarry likes this.
  9. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Meaning no disrespect. :beer Your signature: :evil
    "Never be afraid to try something new. Remember it was a lone amateur that built the Ark and a large team of professionals that built the Titanic." Dave Barry

    I've never done the project, you've done your homework, jump in, take photos. Remove cover: I'd do this with the bike on the sidestand, there are one or two washers inside the cover and you want them falling to the left if they don't stick to the cover (oil friction). Once you find 3 & 5, you can straighten the bike to vertical, making access easier. Scrape gasket, be patient, gaskets can be a PITA to remove, you don't want to nick the gasket surface with a scraper. Remove old, install new torque limiter. Grease gasket, install cover. Use a light coat of grease when re-installing the gasket, not RTV or similar.

    I'm assuming this isn't your primary transportation, that you already have the basic tools needed and this isn't the first time you've used tools. Regardless, don't be in a hurry when you start and have a new gasket on hand, just in case the old one breaks. :freaky

    Make sure to account for parts 3 and 5. There's a pair of each, one inside, another outside. It seems most likely that #5 will stay in their bosses due to oil suction.

    [​IMG]

    You've probably already seen this pic. There isn't much involved.

    [​IMG]
    #89
  10. Toscana1

    Toscana1 Younger by the ride.

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    Thanks much. The photo helps, I had not seen it before. I have the tools, fairly competent with them, and have a loaner lift. I figured I'd do the NSU fix (mine were barely finger tight) while it was drained and on the lift.
    My biggest question was exactly where the torque limiter was. The photo helped identify the culprit, thanks. Now to check it and get the proper one ordered.
    #90
  11. Krusty ...

    Krusty ... What? Me hurry?

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    Here's a guide to thread locking compounds and their different applications. Useful to know for the NSU fix, and many other instances. Thanks 955626846 :bow

    #91
  12. Krusty ...

    Krusty ... What? Me hurry?

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    As mentioned, there have been a small number of DR650's that have developed oil leaks from the output shaft gasket. Replacing this seal used to be troublesome, as the replacemet gasket would just pop out from oil pressure. Stealing a page from BergDonk's play book, Suzuki has released the fix/preventative: an output shaft seal retainer. The part number is 24751-32E00, and it's an inexpensive piece.
    Thanks to 996DL for passing along that P/N... :thumb
    #92
  13. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    i'm seeing less than $15 for the part.
    it's a no-brainer for every DR owner.

    http://drriders.com/topic6575-160.html

    is there a torque spec for those 2 bolts that get reinstalled???
    #93
  14. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    #94
  15. smilin jack

    smilin jack Grandpa Adventurer

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    Oops, just now reporting back. Tore the bike apart, tracing the wiring harness. When the wires behind the headlight were wiggled, the engine would run. After trying this several times, it was noticed one of the plugs was getting HOT. Killed the engine and started looking closer.

    By chance, after tracing the wire from the hot connector behind the headlight clear to the left passenger footpeg, there was no insulation on the wire heading to the tail light. It was rubbing on the inside of the passenger peg and shorting out. That caused low voltage to the CDI box.

    The insulation was off for a few inches and the stranded wire was down to only a few strands. Got out the soldering gun and twisted more wire around it and soldered in place. Lots of tape and a section of cable protector was applied.

    No problems since then (Oct 2012 to now April 2014= 61.5K miles now).

    Edit: Still working great at 78K miles. April 2016

    Dave
    #95
  16. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Thanks for the follow-up Dave; I'll check my wiring this morning.

    Sarah
    #96
  17. Krusty ...

    Krusty ... What? Me hurry?

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    Many DR650 owners are familiar with the distressingly noisy squawking the starter can emit, especially in cooler weather. While more of an annoyance than a problem, the fix has arrived...

    Warp9 Racing has jumped into the DR650 aftermarket with both feet, and one of their many upgrades is a ball bearing starter cap that replaces the Suzuki brass bearing cap.

    And if you haven't sent Procycle enough money lately, all the new Warp9 DR650 parts are available there.

    [​IMG]
    #97
    smilin jack likes this.
  18. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Copied from the big DR thread: :beer

    #98
  19. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    Behind the headlight: Connect the two yellow/green wires coming from the main harness, this is stock.
    [​IMG]

    I decided to keep the safety switch, but it did fail sometime after 50k miles, the bike wouldn't start. :cry Since I was home, it was a non-event. :clap

    Dirty:
    [​IMG]

    Cleaned:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #99
    smilin jack likes this.
  20. 00Buck

    00Buck dirt rules

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    My '08 with 22,000 km has the distressing starter squawk, especially when cold. I see Warp9 has the fix. But could I remove the cover and apply light grease to the bushing if it is not badly worn? Wondering how long that will last.