DR650SE Index Topic #5- BRAKES

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Krusty ..., Nov 4, 2010.

  1. macdesign

    macdesign Just another f@t b@st@rd

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    136
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Thanks for that ADV8 ..... and eakins!
    It took a while but we got the answer.

    I've currently got a Motomaster 320 disc and 4 pot caliper, a Brembo KTM 640 master cylinder, a HEL braided steel line on a 17" road tyre.
    We'll see how it goes once it hits the road.

    Cheers

    #21
  2. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
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    10,394
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    SE Denver-ish
    I've never liked that the rear brake pedal has to be removed to grease it. There's no bushing, wear is permanent in the frame. :puke1 So I've done this to several of my previous bikes. I usually drill and tap a hole in the frame, but there isn't a good place for the zerk. This idea was from doc_ricketts on 11-25-07 in the DR thread, once he said 10mm zerk, I figured out what he meant. He hammered in a wood plug on the backside, I did this.

    My pegs are down and back 1", this puts my heel nearer the zerk, but it hasn't broken off in the last 7k miles, so there is enough room. I didn't have a 10 x 1mm bolt so I used a 10 x 1.25 (the zerk is 10 x 1mm). This means that I used two different taps.

    [​IMG]

    The pedal is upside down in the pic, the wear is on the bottom side and that's where you want the grease. I drilled the grease hole the same size as the cotter pin.
    Cut the head off of your bolt, notch with a hacksaw or cut-off wheel and test fit.

    [​IMG]

    Make sure the plug goes in far enough to completely clear the cotter pin. It's hard enough to get that pin in there, no reason to make it a tight fit. :deal
    Remove plug, Loctite, re-install, yer done. Disclaimer: this will make a mess down at the pedal, but it's better than the wear.
    Next time I have it apart, I'll shim the 'in and out' play tighter, I think it's about 1/16" and lets grease flow through easily.

    Edit: I'll put an O-ring over the shaft, between the frame and pedal. :nod

    [​IMG]

    The zerk is 10 x 1mm thread, and it's easy to see the size difference.

    [​IMG]

    :freaky

    Pic 5
    [​IMG]

    Edit:

    Adding the o-ring(s): The first attempt was with a 1/16" o-ring, which wasn't much better than before. So I headed over to the local Ace Hardware to look at o-rings. Although individual clear plastic packaging costs more per piece, it made looking at my options much easier. Any time someone asked if I needed help: "Nope, just engineering, thanks." :wink: So I bought a range of 'guesstimated' sizes and headed home.

    This is where I ended up:

    [​IMG]

    If you look closely, there is a slight bulge in the o-ring on the left side (end of weld bump). It's what makes this o-ring work. That bump makes the o-ring try to slide off; lightly pressing it against the pedal, becoming a second seal.
    [​IMG]

    The idea works because the smaller o-ring on the pedal shaft is lightly compressed; this is the clamp I used to do that. The split clamp design allowed the shaft to press through the frame and I was able to push the cotter key in by hand.
    [​IMG]

    Here's what you need to know (the right package says 3/4 x 9/16 x 3/32):

    [​IMG]

    I was really pleased because it takes a bit of pressure with the grease gun, no more 'free-flow'.
    :freaky
    #22
    Mister+Venture likes this.
  3. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,483
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    Okay. It's dark. It's cold. And I'm scratching my head on something that should be simple.

    I just installed the Procycle peg lowering kit and adjusting the rear brake pedal height is perplexing me.

    If I adjust the screw far enough to get the pedal level with the plane of the peg surface I don't get any grip at the brakes.

    If I adjust the screw to get a grip a the brakes, the pedal height in relationship to the plane of the peg is too high.

    Sooo ... what's the fix?

    Thanks in advance,
    Rick

    Via edit - It does have the SW Moto-tech centerstand installed.
    #23
  4. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Look at pic 5 right above your post, it's my bike with lowered pegs (down 1" and back 1"). Notice the threaded portion on the master cylinder rod, it's shorter than the stock setup IIRC. What I had to do was disassemble the linkage enough to grind the lower end off of that rod: 1/4" - 5/16". This will allow the rear end of the brake pedal (at the clevis pin), to draw upward enough to lower the pedal itself. You can also see how far the brake is below the clutch cover and where it was scratching.

    Without grinding the end of the rod off, it hits the rear end of the brake, preventing the pedal from adjusting lower (higher at the rear). Removing 1/4" - 5/16" will still allow the brake pedal to be set back up to the stock height.

    I also had to extend the brake spring about an inch, it was too tight. You can see the gaps between the coils.

    Well, I understand what I said. :D
    #24
  5. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    Thanks, and I follow what you are saying.

    After fiddling with it this morning I can get the adjustment set to where I have brakes, but the pedal tip is still slightly higher than the plane of the footrest. Just as soon as I go into the woods with it like that and stand up on the pegs I'll be tapping the pedal whether I want to or not.

    So I'm going to need to pull the lever off and grind a bit from the bottom to get the clearance I need, and I have two questions:

    1. (a) What's the trick to removing the pedal lever and (b) disconnecting the master cylinder shackle? My manual is loaned out so I am having trouble getting an "exploded" view.

    2. How much metal to remove from the bottom of the lever?

    :huh
    #25
  6. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    7,172
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    Split pin on the inside of the frame to remove the pedal.
    #26
  7. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    Roger that. I just got in from giving it a spic and span wash job. That might simplify the "what am I looking at" quotient.
    #27
  8. ADV8

    ADV8 Taumarunui..Darwin..

    Joined:
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    North of Sydney.
    That set up is getting changed again.
    I now have a 4 piston Brembo caliper and looking for a adapter.

    [​IMG]

    Will look at seeing if a RMZ hub will work with the Procycle DR SM wheel,new 320 mm rotor with the master cylinder being a Brembo 15 mm radial,a 16 mm Yamaha radial or perhaps one off a single caliper Ducati.
    #28
  9. sagedrifter

    sagedrifter Southern Explorer

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,534
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Alabama
    With the procycle lowerd pegs I had to grind about 3/16" off the brake lever. I do have the center stand too, so grinding is a must if you want a rear brake and the pc lowerd pegs.

    Sent from my GT-S5690L using Tapatalk
    #29
  10. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Edit: I missed Sagedrifter's point about grinding 3/16" off the brake lever with PC lowered pegs, so this may be a different issue:

    1/4" to 5/16", far enough to get your pedal below the peg. You don't have to remove the pedal or brake cylinder. Pull the clevis pin (cotter pin hiding on the back side), loosen the 10mm nut on the rod, remove the clevis and grind the rod while still hanging from the brake cylinder: Warning, this is a good place to hurt yourself. :deal I didn't know how to remove the rod from the brake cylinder and I had to grind, fit, grind, fit etc. so I needed the rod in place anyway.

    Another point to check: after readjusting, my pedal hit on the front of the lowering bracket (template graciously provided by NordieBoy), stopping downward motion (no brake); so I removed a bit from it and the pedal to allow clearance.

    ADV8: :thumb
    #30
  11. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    I left the pedal at the stock height. I liked it out of the way. Same with the shifter.
    #31
  12. sagedrifter

    sagedrifter Southern Explorer

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    Apr 23, 2006
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    1,534
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Alabama
    I left my brake lever on the bike and used a die grinder with a barrel bit, took me a couple moments... :D

    My PC lowered pegs came with a longer spring too. I put some BBQ high temp flat black paint on the lever and its been fine for over 10,000 miles.

    After a year with the DP pads I'm very happy with them. Very little brake dust, good stopping power and they last. OEM feel and sound without the black dust. I feel it was money well spent, the front pads have out lived the original OEM and still have more to give. I'll be buying DP pads from now on.
    #32
  13. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    Using my Dremel tool and a barrel bit (rough sander belt) I took 5/16''s off the bottom of the lever with it still on the bike.

    [​IMG]

    To begin, I removed the right side peg and center stand springs, and then I ground a "recess" on each end of the area and then took out the middle.

    [​IMG]

    When it was all done I still had to go back and take a bit more off the front or leading edge of the section I ground to get the last bit of clearance for the pedal.

    [​IMG]

    After that I removed the master cylinder shackle (did someone call it a "clevis pin") and took 1/4 inch off the master cylinder shank with a cutting wheel. To secure the shank and keep it from jumping around I used a 2-1/2 inch "C" clamp and secured it to the brake lever. Worked like a charm.

    Finally, I reassembled it all and adjusted the brake. Deed done.

    Thanks to all for the feedback.

    :thumb

    PS: My apologies for the poor lighting.
    #33
  14. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Slips down at the arrow, rubs on the rotor: (saws with the 320mm rotor shown here)
    [​IMG]
    #34
  15. Motodeficient

    Motodeficient Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
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    Maine
    I had to put some electrical tape on the SS line at the area of the clamp to make the diameter of the clamp large enough to hold it. It would be very dangerous to have the brake line moving around, especially with the large rotor. Since I only ride street, and I have a 320mm front rotor, I also re-routed the brake line on the outside of the fork for extra safety. This may or may not be advisable if you ride off road where sticks could grab it.
    #35
  16. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    May 29, 2002
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    21,808
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    Fort Collins, Colorado
    great tip for all.

    i've heard that one before and used it on my DR.
    i did the normal bleed method till things seem good then,
    zip tied the lever against the bar overnight. it opens the system so all the left over bubbles rise to top and escape out. i just left the top cap off and put a towel over top so nothing could fall in. the next morning the cap goes back on and the system is rock solid. :clap
    #36
  17. rockydrxrvr

    rockydrxrvr Multi Meter Meathead

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    172
    Location:
    Oregon Mountains, Great Riding,Not too cold.
    My 2006 DR developed almost non-stopping ability on the Rear Brake,

    So I bought new EBC FA152-R pads, chemically clean rotors, sanded with 800 grit, finished with a cross/X path on the sanding, and still...:thwak no amount of foot force would give me 'some' wheel lockup, and stopping power. Old pads had lots of surface left, but glazed, and some pollution.

    Ok...so a pint of new DOT 4, pull all the old fluid thru with a simple elevated hose and jar trick, and :clap moderate pressure = moderate lock.

    So old fluid, with a possibility of air in the line, ( which watching the clear tube, saw one bubble only).

    Bleed and Dot 4 your DR system before you buy new pads, not like dummy here, but OK...those pads did have 11 k on them.

    Next step is a 'Braided' line, as I want a bit less foot pressure for the same results.

    Also of note, I dropped my pegs with a 1.5'' lowering kit, and may have something to do with the angle of leverage/foot pressure, but my finish work on the lowering, gave me an 'even plain' of petal vs. brake arm.
    #37
  18. Jenn

    Jenn praise seitan!

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,064
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    Anyone have a photo tutorial for how to change rear brakepads on the DR650SE? Thanks!
    #38
  19. TinMan207

    TinMan207 Most often a lurker...

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    1,936
    Location:
    Southern Maine -- most days
    Page 5-34 of the shop manual.
    [​IMG]

    The DR is definitely worth having the shop manual for. Most everything is simple to work on, and seldom requires special tools.

    Sent from my AT100 using Tapatalk
    #39
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  20. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    Nov 28, 2006
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    9,648
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    By the Great Lakes
    Make sure that the brake pedal is not contacting the footpeg mount.

    Did you check the thickness of the rotor? A rotor that is too thin could cause what you describe. I clean rotors with brake cleaner or acetone. Be sure not to breathe any of the brake cleaner. It can be lethal, even in small exposures.

    I run stock rotors and either stock or cheapy pads. With braided stainless hoses and a good bleed, my '03 DR can lock either tire at will on dry pavement. My '13 still has stock rubber hoses and is NOTICEABLY mushier for braking.
    #40