DR650SE Index Topic #6- TIRES, TUBES & WHEELS

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Krusty ..., Nov 4, 2010.

  1. Pr0xy

    Pr0xy Shreddin' the gnar

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    Jan 31, 2008
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    Springtown, TX
    A rubber mallet is one way... I've found that bouncing the wheel a few times off the floor seems to work also.
  2. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Dec 27, 2006
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    13,745
    Location:
    chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
    Same basic thing here,I like the 19" on the front,Shinko 705's on the 19"/17" set of wheels.
    Stock wheels get what ever knobbies I have around,usually a 606 on the back and regular knob on the front.
    Ive tried the Mefo's,took em off halfway through their tread life and put em in the basement,rear was about smoked in 2000 miles and never really hooked up on anything. The best thing was they would both break loose and slide on pavemento at full lean.
    Not my favorite.
  3. Heavy

    Heavy Been here awhile

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    Jun 13, 2007
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    Barrie, ON
    Tried that one. Even went so far as to put the wheel back on and drive it around, aiming for all the bumps and potholes I could find. Didn't do it until I got the pressure way up.

    Thanks for the suggestion though.

  4. sagedrifter

    sagedrifter Southern Explorer

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    Jacksonville, Alabama
    If you keep having problems getting tires to seat, try this: http://www.pepboys.com/product/details/8446008/

    I don't have any trouble getting the tires on most of the time with just water, but some times the rubber is sticky, soft, too hot etc. Then having a tire lube is ideal and makes things seat with no drama. One time it works fine dry, next time it needs some moisture, then its very catchy and won't seat, lube to the rescue.. :rofl
  5. kstoo

    kstoo Adventurer

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    Nov 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    74
    Location:
    Burlington WI
    I have a 2007. What wheels are interchangeable with this year? Can I use any wheel from 1996-2013? Anything that I need to watch out for?
  6. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    Kiwiland
    All of them, yes, nope.
  7. Nessman

    Nessman Evangelical Atheist

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    Feb 3, 2004
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    2,245
    Location:
    Everett, WA
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=17300583&postcount=78

    Two years and ~5000 miles of urban commando duty and they're still kicking. I do no dirt, very little freeway riding and have a couple of nice corners on my way to work to keep the flat spots away :wink:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When I bought these BB gave me a hella deal on a second set, hopefully I can wear them out before my second set goes bad.

    Big :thumb for my 705s
  8. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    Stasis.
    +1. The stuff is $15 / gallon , their smallest size.
  9. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    May 29, 2002
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    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    read Neduro's thread
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

    and yes that is a great tool to own if you have no tools at this moment and have not changed a tire. breaking a bead can often be on of the hardest things to do with some tire designs. you might want to add 1 more tire lever in the mix (that tool offers 2) as i found having 3 is key at times.

    the biggest trick to mounting is to not pinch the tube by mistake (slightly inflate the tube so it does not fold on itself and wedge in the bead area or get nicked by a tire iron & use some baby powder) and to push the already mounted bead side of the tire down into the rim well (center dished area) so you gain length & room to finish mounting the tire bead onto the rim. those that have problems getting the last bit of tire on the rim often forget to push the opposite side of the tire bead into the well!

    these help a ton out in the field
    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=538235
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=380877 - I use this one

    biggest tip i can offer you: 1st practice changing tires at home!!!
  10. Midpack

    Midpack Been here awhile

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    Las Cruces, NM
    Just back from a 3 day, 3 bike ride of 830 miles along the NM/Mexico and AZ/NM boarders. The DR had a fresh set of Shinko 705s on my back up rims. Sizes were 90/90 21 and 130/90 17 aired at 26 front and 28 rear which measured 28/30 once the tires warmed up. A 2lb gain is what I understand to be a good gauge for proper tire settings. This was all 2 lane state roads with about 50 miles of I 10 and 6000 feet of elevation change. These tires ROCK, they feel planted in corners, turn in is good, and absorb irregularities well. With stock gearing the bike cruised at 75 to 80 keeping up with a KTM 950 and Triumph 800XC. Tire wear was minimal and no chicken strips! Just ordered an EBC oversized
    rotor and pad set to take advantage of the grip these tires supply. Also looking into lacing a 19" rim to the front hub.
  11. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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  12. SBG

    SBG Neville1 to TT boys

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    May 28, 2004
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    Rehoboth MA
    I forget what the stock tires were that came on my 1990, but they were okay and lasted about 4k miles. When it was time to switch up, I went with Dunlop 606's. They were a decent off-road tire, but they seemed like they were more for hardpack. As they wore, the knobs, especially the front started looking like Dragon teeth. That said, they actually gripped the road very well if it was dry. I could get some scary angles for knobbies like that on the road.

    They only lasted about 2500/3k. As they wear, they really start to vibrate a lot, and anything over 85 mph isn't recommended after about 1000 miles of use.

    The Continental Escapes were next and I'm about to replace them after about 6000 miles. The front is still nearly mint, but the rear is history, as to be expected. I must say, for a tire that is 90% street, my friends talked me into some single track. I have to say, I was impressed. I relied a LOT more on momentum then ever before. Braking was almost non existent and doing heard was what got me around corners because it locked up way too easy and would just slide without effective showing down a 350 lbs bike. Same thing with obstacles. Momentum, because without it, traction would be hard to find.

    So, if you're a street guy most of the time, the Escape is excellent, and I must say, dry traction is great as my chicken strips are VERY small.

    And now for something different. I was rolling on 130's with my tires and decided to step it up to a 150 big block. I also decided to get a wider wheel. I'm going with a 4.25 so the tire won't be so deformed. Once it's mounted I'll give an evaluation on the Kenda big block.

    Pic of uncounted big block next to my mounted Conti Escape.

    [​IMG]
  13. Midpack

    Midpack Been here awhile

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    Just a thought, did you consider the added weight of the Big Block verses the 606? I checked their spec's finding a 2lb. difference. Then add the extra weight of the wider wheel. This will effect your suspension for off road and acceleration. It will defiantly look impressive.
  14. severely

    severely almost a noob

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    Jan 26, 2013
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    46
    Location:
    odessa MO/donna TX
    I have set of supermoto wheels for drz400e and just picked up an 03 dr 650. I've read here the front won't work because of axle diameter, any chance the rear will transplant? Thanks for a reply.
  15. TinMan207

    TinMan207 Most often a lurker...

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    Southern Maine -- most days
    The common swap is with the 350 wheels. Don't now about the DRZ400. But if you have the wheels, take a couple moments and try the swap and let us know. :evil
  16. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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  17. ryder1

    ryder1 Long timer

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    SEPA
    Can I use tubeless tires (the rear from my Wee) on my DR? I know that the tire may rub when the suspension is fully compressed but other than that would there be an issue?
  18. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    How to install rear hub bearings:

    pic from manual
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-RXROc7pLVRs/VWJ6AapDVNI/AAAAAAAAIbE/M1jrSOhzMLU/s595/Untitled.jpg


    Read all these instructions 1st to fully understand the unique process.
    Failure to follow exactly will result in early failure of your bearing.

    -pull new bearings side seal out and check grease amount. add more if needed but not completely full.
    -place bearing in freezer to help with install (shrinks them slightly)
    -remove the cush drive unit from the hub.

    -remove old bearings from hub (Pit Posse and Rocky Mtn ATV both sell bearing pullers)
    -clean up hub bearing slot in hubs
    -heat bearing slot on hub to slightly expand opening.
    -lightly grease hub/bearing for ease of install.

    -set the brake rotor side bearing in 1st. make sure bearing is going in straight.
    -fully seated in hub with either a socket (touching only the outer race) or a thick flat washer (that covers the whole bearing. inner and outer race) or a bearing set tool (a large flat washer with a punch tool end). the bearing will fully seat in hub. the metallic sound will change if using a hammer set tool.
    -place spacer in the hub from the other side (cush drive).

    -start (cush side) bearing in hub on the other side & make sure its going in straight. lightly tap around the outside edge of the bearing. never ever tap the inner race of a new bearing! this will destroy a bearing.
    -use a threaded rod with a thick washers on both sides (or a bearing press tool) and tighten nuts to pull 2nd bearing in tight against space or use a bearing set tool to do the same. These washers must span the whole size of the bearing including the inner and outer races. Pulling the whole bearing in at once is the key move. Never set the 2nd bearing in with pressure on the outer race only (your press tool must cover both inner & outer race) such as using a socket! The inner and the outer race must be pressed in all together at once. Pit Posse sells press tool.
    -set in 2nd bearing until it is fully seated against the spacer. as long as the 2nd bearing is set it with both the inner and outer race is pressed in at the same time (the whole bearing), it will set up properly against the spacer. setting the 2nd bearing in with the outer race only results in the bearing being pressing in too far and thus load on the bearing .

    tools:
    http://pitposse.com/whbereset.html
    http://pitposse.com/beraandsedr.html
    https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/989/20342/Tusk-Bearing-Remover

    -the cush drive bearing is replaced in the same fashion and will be fully set into the cush drive until it bottoms out.
  19. Midpack

    Midpack Been here awhile

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    Jun 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    157
    Location:
    Las Cruces, NM
    eakins, thanks for the bearing info. Just in time as I've just bought bearing/seals for front, rear wheel hubs, and sprocket carrier. Riders like you in the DR650 treads keep my bike out of the shop and pride of accomplishment in self maintenance.
  20. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    21,595
    Location:
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    thanks the guys in the DR thread for pointing out the correct way.
    i just documented it.