Dual Sport Trailer assembly thread

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by The Cheat, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Eddieb

    Eddieb www.AdventureRidingNZ.co.nz

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,035
    Location:
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    A not very good pic of mine in progress.

    [​IMG]
  2. smoothride

    smoothride Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    282
    Location:
    ont canada
    Try eBay I just ordered to 14 inch wheels for 130$ just like the guy that builds the motomule should have them on Friday. I will be using one to build a trailer for the bike.
  3. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Not the Messiah

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    269
    Location:
    Melb'n, 'Straya
    Thanks Curtis,
    i came back to this thread thinking that someone would have linky'd us back to another thread in ADV with a picture of an aluminium tool box third wheeler behind a green road bike!
    i saw this whilst looking for something else and running out of battery on the laptop. I kept going on whatever the other mission was (something of eminently forgettable importance) and then couldn't find my way back to the tool box trailer........
    So it's back to the Search function...
  4. Eddieb

    Eddieb www.AdventureRidingNZ.co.nz

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,035
    Location:
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Mocking up the hitch spacing on mine last sunday

    [​IMG]

    and a quick test run around the yard
    <IFRAME height=360 src="//www.youtube.com/embed/McBfLqvZxB8" frameBorder=0 width=640 allowfullscreen></IFRAME>
  5. Curtis in Texas

    Curtis in Texas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    207
    Location:
    Rhome Texas
    Love it EddirB. Although it looks long, it tracks right behind your DR just fine! Might want to buiild a box for cargo and teach the dog to ride in it.:lol3 Looks like he wanted to go anyway.

    If kept your brakes on that rear wheel you could rig up a brake lever out of a decompression lever of old, to make a quick stop lever for the trailer. I'd rig it with the front brake lever so you could apply either one.

    That or put in a Recluse Clutch and make your clutch lever the trailer brake control................

    Friend brought a 400 Suzuki with one in it to my shop for an electrical issue and I rode it around the neighborhood to see how I liked the auto clutches. I must say I was impressed. Taking off was so easy. Would make pulling a trailer a breeze!

    I would put one in my 06 KLR but then I'd have to give up the kick start I just put in it this Winter.
  6. Eddieb

    Eddieb www.AdventureRidingNZ.co.nz

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,035
    Location:
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    That dog is not the smartest and is known to have a rubber and plastic fetish :lol3

    In the pic above you can see the box that is going to be mounted on it. The drum brake is still on the rear wheel, it's not connected at the moment but it is an option to reconnect it, apparently you can get small electrical actuators which could be connected up to the brake rod and activated off the brake light.

    There's a little bit of flex in the frame and hitch but nothing that can't be dealt with. For the test the hitch upright was only tacked on.
  7. Curtis in Texas

    Curtis in Texas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    207
    Location:
    Rhome Texas
    My advise is to stay away from electric actuators. They will eventually fail. Some sooner than later. There is a way to rig a long brake cable and put a connector on the tongue. That way you can leave the bikes parts on the bike and the trailers cables on it. Use bicycles parts because they are cheaper and easier to get long. And you'll not use it enough to wear the bicycle parts out.

    If you look at my trailer the angled braces are what really made the thing like a bridge. It does NOT FLEX anywhere! And that's because of the triangulation bracing. Even the curvy tubing on the tongue is bracing for the tongue.

    As for the dog, I believe I'd spray my tires with something that has a taste he won't like.

    But, you can't fix stupid. But you can make sure it leaves a bad taste in his mouth,:lol3
  8. oPAULo

    oPAULo jack of all terrain

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,201
    Location:
    Bedford, Indiana
    OK my trailer is still working awesome except for a couple things.
    Still working on the slight sway I'm getting above 55mph.
    I think all new bearings and 1 or 2 extra gussets will fix the sway.
    My big problem is the shocks. Stock Z50 shocks were a shade stiff and zero damping.
    I picked up some "nitrogen filled" shocks on ebay and they were WAY too stiff.
    I thought I'd remove the springs to see how just the "nitrogen filling" would work and found them to be empty.
    They actually did hold air though so I tried it like that. Not bad but still no damping and the air only last for an hour ride.
    Anyone got any ideas?? Maybe those hatchback/hood shocks for a car? 1/4 midget shocks? MTN bike front shocks would be about right if I could fab them in there somehow..:hmmmmm
    [​IMG]
  9. Eddieb

    Eddieb www.AdventureRidingNZ.co.nz

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,035
    Location:
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    What symptoms do the too hard shocks cause? My trailer above is using the rear end of a Honda GL145 and while it hasn't been road tested yet the shocks seem way too hard even on their softest setting. If I sit my 85kg on the rear frame they barely move and I'll only be carrying 1/3 of that at most.
  10. oPAULo

    oPAULo jack of all terrain

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,201
    Location:
    Bedford, Indiana
    Bounces off the ground over the bigger bumps like railroad tracks, pot holes, some bridge sections. Bounces around pretty good when flying down gravel roads.
  11. duanew1

    duanew1 In my Pajama pants

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    You can move the shock mount location to make have less leverage. Either lay the shock down more or move the shock mount up the swingarm.
  12. chuggins143

    chuggins143 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    131
    Location:
    Richardson, TX.... <sigh>
    Yep, sounds like you need to hit it with more leverage for the load it will be seeing normally. ...and it needs to have enough travel at that setting actually let the internal damping work.

    What we need is a shock assembly that is tunable with springs that can be changed to dial in the ride... like an offroad coilover shock.
    :freaky
    Good luck!
    C
  13. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,259
  14. MrBracket

    MrBracket Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    263
    Location:
    Springfield, Oregon
    My 2cents (whether or not it's worth that much???), there are pro's and con's to each hitching setup. You are pulling a trailer, where do you want your compromise?

    Hitching to the axle/swingarm is very simple and easy to mount to, it also keeps the load on the motorcycle down low to the ground and does not require stiffer springs on the bike. It does however add un-sprung weight, this does indeed take away performance from the rear suspension of the motorcycle and offers no suspension at all to the front of the trailer.

    Hitching to the sub-frame gives the front of the trailer suspension and does not add un-sprung weight to the motorcycle. It however may require you to stiffen your rear suspension while pulling a trailer and lighten it while your not. It is also more complicated, especially if you have a bike that has a weak subframe. Suspending the front of the trailer means the front of the trailer dives down when you hit a bump, you need to stay aware when offroad that it doesn't hit the ground. This makes it hard to keep the trailer load low to the ground when many bikes have 10+ inches of rear travel... Hitching to the subframe also allows the trailer to push the bike around more while turning. The higher the hitch point the more leverage the trailer has to push the bike around. Imagine trying to tip a bike off it's kickstand by pushing on it's rear axle versus pushing on it's seat...

    IMO, the perfect hitch would mount to the bike where it can be sprung weight and at about axle height from the ground. This can indeed be done, but it requires considerable effort to create a very stiff lightweight mounting point. It would be custom to each motorcycle and not be cost effective. Perfect project, for the do-it-yourselfer!
  15. boatpuller

    boatpuller Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    760
    Location:
    Central fly-over land.
    very interesting points, Mr. Bracket.

    If one could build a hitch that pivots on the foot peg brackets, in front of the rear wheel, they would have all the advantages you listed, plus have the weight carried by both wheels, much like a goose neck or 5th wheel trailer does on a truck. That tends to be very stable. But as you said, a custom job for sure, and not a production solution.
  16. xathor

    xathor Not actually Gnarly

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    449
    Location:
    Huntsville, Alabama


    At about 45 seconds in the video your bike leans right and your trailer leans left.

    This is going to put a crazy amount of stress on the mount and possibly throw you off the bike with some weight applied to trailer.

    I would revise your mount.
  17. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,259
    Look closer (watch the front wheel): there was a quick left, right, left transition; presumably to stay upright on an uneven/damp surface. the trailer reacted exactly how it should in that circumstance.
  18. Eddieb

    Eddieb www.AdventureRidingNZ.co.nz

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,035
    Location:
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    The changes in direction were to video what the trailer would do under those sort of circumstances, just wobbling around as you might do on an uneven trail.

    2 discoveries from the test ride were that the central beam wasn't rigid enough and so flexed under changes of direction, and that there was small but significant enough lateral play in the mount which was amplified significantly by the time that play reached the end of the trailer. Both of these led to some changes which makes the trailer follow the bikes lead much better.

    Thats why we do testing, to find the issues before things are released into the wild.
  19. marguyo

    marguyo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    lac st jean,quebec canada
    hi ! with adv last years i built my adv versy same at jd rock,this years i built my trailer same your ,ok time is publish is now!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    short descrip.
    bw's tubless wheel
    air ride(seat truck)
    70 lbs(20 on tongue,50 trailer wheel)
    9 po clearence


    2 set up; 90lts cargo and 5 gallons of gaz or 132 lts cargo no gaz
  20. MrBracket

    MrBracket Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    263
    Location:
    Springfield, Oregon
    Marguyo,

    I like your trailer and your bike! Nice work!

    I played around with the angle of the hitch pivot quite a bit when building my first couple trailers.

    [​IMG]

    I'm betting you'll find that your trailer feels more comfortable in the corners if you tilt the hitch pivot forward about 10 deg.

    That air bag spring is nice, I bet that makes it easy to adjust your spring rate for different loads, very nice!

    Great looking setup!