Ducati MultiStrada 1200

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Paulvt1, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. aceonthebeach3

    aceonthebeach3 Been here awhile

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    Funny about the attitude of that dealer. We have 1 locally that is the same way but they only sell Japanese bikes. Last year when my father inlaw gave me his Harley (the Harley was in Missouri & I am in South Carolina) I looked into shipping & I think the cheapest I could find was $500 before taxes & such. I ended up driving my truck the 2,000 mile round trip because it was way cheaper. Maybe different with new bikes. Good luck.
  2. NMEXPAT

    NMEXPAT Been here awhile

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    I've been very happy with the Marzocchis. I've yet to replace the front springs due to my weight, since I'm not a light Italian. I have only two compliants, which could be easily fixed with some mild effort. The factory settings for preload, compression and rebound damping are way too light. I've adjusted everything to suit my weight, riding style and riding typical conditions.

    Since I haven't updated the spring rates, I've increased the preload and adjusted the compression damping. The changes have resulted in less pitching (squat and dive) but then made the fork much more harsh over small but sharp bumps that seem so prevalent in Houston. The sharp bumps are due to the road heaving up, really are transmitted up to the rider with my current set up. The good part is that the excessive fork dive problem when braking has been fixed. I'll take short jarring bumps every once in awhile over diving at every brake application. I've also increased the fork oil weight, to I think to 10wt instead of 7wt to help resist the forks blowing through the entire stroke when coming down from wheelies. The change in oil weight helped, it doesn't blow through as often now.

    With some effort, I could correct these problems at the next service by installing the correct fork springs for my weight and increasing the amount of oil, by about 10mm. I'm on the fence about the oil weight 10 or 7. I just need more oil so it firms up for the last half of travel. At least this what I seem to remember what adding oil does to front suspensions.

    I would say a cartridge kit is more of a luxury. I've given it serious though, but when it comes time to but my money where my mind is I always back out.

    Please keep in mind most of my usual miles are commuting. For touring, the changes I've made are more than sufficient. For washboard gravel roads, they are too harsh. But then again that's less than 1% of my riding.

    I've been very happy with the BASE shock, a sachs unit? I only need to update the spring rate as well. I've increased the preload and rebound damping.
  3. NMEXPAT

    NMEXPAT Been here awhile

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    Dr. Greg,

    Thanks for the response and write up. I was only mildly interested in a cruise control, which I would use only for my true long distance rides, for getting out of Texas and going some place fun.

    Since I have the full race termi's the reflashing the ECU might cause a problem for me. Perhaps, the map Waynes supplies is better? I'd have to contact them about this.

    Anyways, how do you actually activate and control the CC? Do you use the stock handle bars controls? Does anything show up on the dash?

    Thanks again!
  4. Dr. Greg

    Dr. Greg Tryin' to get home..

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    I was gonna write up an article documenting my Tuneboy cruise control install, but the fact that I had to wait a week to get the correct files kind of bummed me out, so I didn't. Now I'm getting enough questions about it that maybe I should write it up...

    You activate the CC using the "start" button. Yep, the same one that controls the heated grips. And yes, the CC and heated grips "interact" in a sense, but everything works OK.

    No display of any kind.

    --Doc

  5. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Hi NMEXPAT, thanks for your comments on the stock fork. Sounds like it works quite well.

    I am leaning more and more towards picking up a 2013 base model. If the suspension is okay or better then I could ride it around quite happily while waiting for the Ohlins semi-active kit to come out. Then could decide whether to go for that package, or fit a manual Ohlins shock and a fork kit, or just the manual shock, or simply leave it alone (at least until the stock shock wears out).

    The full Ohlins package obviously will be very good (even if not Skyhook), and of course could be removed and sold separately at new bike time, or likely removed and fitted to another Multi if/when Ducati releases a fresh upgrade.

    BTW: from Ducati's promotional material on the web, it appears the 2013 base model will come with the same 85-125N/mm progressive rear spring that they are fitting to the Skyhook bikes. If they make that available as a spare part, it could be a good upgrade for prior-year base models.

    On your fork dive thing, if it were me, I think I'd be going up a size on the front springs and sticking with the standard weight oil.

    And I'd be simply riding around what brake dive remained. It is built into the design.

    Sure, you can control it by adding so much spring that the fork behaves like a short-travel sport bike fork, but then you've got the height of the long-travel Multi without the plushness that the long travel provides. Or you can firm up the low-speed damping by adding viscosity, as you have, with a similar effect: less brake dive but harsh high-speed damping that jars you on sharpish hits.

    As you have likely worked out, that is one conflict that Skyhook helps resolve. :D




  6. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    NMExpat, what are the sag measurements of your bike? While you don't have any/many choices for the rear spring, it would give you a better idea as to which springs to buy for the front, and it's a good exercise to perform if you haven't already.
  7. JNRobert

    JNRobert Breaking Wind

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    How much do you weigh (perhaps I missed this)? I weigh about 200lbs and haven't experienced any of this on mine. Even a sport bike would "blow through" it's travel if you landed a wheelie hard.

    I also haven't experienced excessive dive. There's an off ramp that I take that is down hill, fast and rolling dips in the middle of it. I find it's an excellent test of front suspension and have taken most bikes I've owned in the last ten years down it. On the Multi I hit it at about 90mph and absolutely bury the front. On most bikes this means once you get to the rollers the front end has nothing left and you often have to let off or take the pounding of a locked front end. The 'Strada just soaks it up - there seems to be an additional something even with the forks at the bottom of their stroke.

    While it does dive more than a sportbike (duh) it's nothing compared to most "adventure" bikes. Even though I have the "cheap" Multi (no Ohlins) I don't think I've experienced a bike with such good suspension off the show room.

    YMMV
  8. NMEXPAT

    NMEXPAT Been here awhile

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    It sounds like you and I are aligned quite closely. Just last night I received the most recent edition of road racing world, in which they reviewed the new Ohlins mechtronix (SP?) electric shock for the 2011-2012 ZX-10. It got very high marks. From reading this review, I've basically decided to wait and see if Ohlins does indeed come out with a new and upgraded electronci semi-active or active fork and shock combo or an old school manual combo.

    Thanks for the tip about the progressive sping from the 2013 base MTS may fit a 2010. I didn't thnk of that. That might be a good option!

    My original post about the base marzocchi forks may have sounded harsh to some inmates, but in reality this is the best set of forks I've had on a bike. My post was talking about some very nit picky details and trying to achieve a delicate balance with the long travel suspension, initially plush but got progressively firmer with an overweight rider in the seat.
  9. NMEXPAT

    NMEXPAT Been here awhile

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    I haven't actually done this for my MTS. I've done this for my other bikes in the past. Up to this point, I just made small changes to the preload, front and rear, to get the right feel, over the past two years. Not entirely scientific. With my weight I know I need to upgrade the springs.

    If it was a huge problem for me I would have done it already. I was trying to discuss the finer details of the base suspension. All things considered I'm very happy with it. I've never regrets about not buying an S or Touring version.
  10. NMEXPAT

    NMEXPAT Been here awhile

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    I weigh 250+lbs with gear, not the skinny Italian test rider.

    With the stock oil weight and factory preload and compression and rebound settings, I could easily lift the rear weel off the ground when moderately braking for a corner. I've increased the fork preload, oil weight and compression damping on the front so it doesn't dive as much and as fast - a more controlled dive motion. I can still lift the rear off the road but it's braking very very hard and very abruptly. Not as bad now.

    It still does dive more than a typical short length suspension, it's just more reasonable now. I prefer a certain feel when loading the front for a corner, all about a personal preference.

    Squating under acceleration in the rear was also reduced by adjusting the preload and comrpession damping. To keep it from rocking back and forth I also adjusted the rebound damping.

    I'm very happy with the base suspension and fully agree with your last sentence. Just trying to achieve the feel I prefer from this bike with such long legs.
  11. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    Your MTS is woefully undersprung. It might feel right to YOU but it's definitely undersprung and would probably ACT a lot better with the proper springs both front and rear. I promise you that the bike will handle MUCH better with the proper springs for your weight. Only trying to be of help. :deal
  12. Pampero

    Pampero Verbose Adventurer

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    Spot on. I am in this category of rider, that is of superior proportions.

    I felt from the first day that the front end was undersprung for me.
    Good suspension is a matter of balance. I changed the front from the stock springs to the available heavier unit and did the same for the rear and lost nothing in respect to comfort or compliance the translation but gained increased control. You cannot make up for being under-sprung by increasing damping. You will sacrifice compliance.
  13. -GREG-

    -GREG- Been here awhile

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    I agree completely. Proper suspension setup is key to knowing a bikes true capabilities. At 250+ once you get the bike properly sprung it will be like owning a new motorcycle. It will make a huge improvement.
  14. 3B43

    3B43 Adventurer

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    The first thing I noticed, on my first ride with my new MTS, was how soft the suspension was! I'm 235 in full gear (always ride in full RR leathers...& no, I'm not 'fat'...6'1"/34" waist) and after playing with it, I have a semi OK setting, but its not correct for a 10 day ride with the bike loaded. I called Dan Kyle Racing and bought the correct springs, but due to the weather (its 30 right now), I haven't swapped springs yet.
  15. expatbrit

    expatbrit Still pretty much a n00b.

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    Dammit, Janet.

    I've been bitten, I think, by the leaky heads bug. Bike is in the shop awaiting final diagnosis, but they definitely believe it is 'excessive white smoke beyond that to be expected from condensation', which sounds like 'coolant' (based on other people's issues) to me.

    At least it's dead cold here, I have the WR250, and I have the RC8R on the way as of today! Work is also too busy to really have any decent play time.
  16. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    Had you taken your bike in previously for the coolant Service Bulletin? :ear

    -SM
  17. Assfault

    Assfault Exposed Member

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    So do you think the problem is the coolant or the head casting?
  18. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    According to the current story coming out of Ducati, they determined that a machine that pre-filled the radiators had malfunctioned and was putting pure glycol into the rads vs a mix of water/glycol. Apparently over time the bikes that got the pure glycol had "bad things" happen (i.e. the glycol ate through the heads), and thus the SB (let's not call it a recall....even though I got a letter telling me to bring my bike in.....ahem.....). If true, I'd say the problem wasn't the infamous "porous heads" (there never was such a problem according to Ducati), but rather a poor mix of coolant. Net-net, if expat did NOT have his not-a-recall-on-the-coolant done, then he could have suffered the results. If he DID have it done, maybe it was too late and the evil glycol had already done it's dirty work. :dunno Either way, if his head/cylinder is toast, Ducati will likely be replacing it under warranty.

    -SM
  19. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    That's a good question, Sock, but what worries me is that even if he did, the failure still occurred. If he didn't have the coolant changed, the rate of failure (it hasn't been all that long since they issued the service bulletin) was incredibly quick as well. Either way........:eek1

    Hopefully the owner's bike is still under warranty and all will be well moving forward, or even better, the bike's bill of health comes back clean. :deal

    edit: funny, looks like we said the same thing (was in the kitchen cleaning up!)
  20. expatbrit

    expatbrit Still pretty much a n00b.

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    I had; it's apparent the damage had been done already -- if it is the infamous coolant issue. Not confirmed yet, but I got it in at the first signs.

    Oalvarez -- yes, still in warranty. 18.5k miles, which seems to be around the magic number. I'd have to go look to see if the coolant was replaced at the 15k service, though I think it was anyway.

    SM -- hadn't heard the 'bad coolant batch'. Interesting.

    For reference, bike is a 2011, bought in April 2011. As I said above, about 18.5k miles, with the only issue being the 'what rear brake' until this winter. Late last year had a random pinhole leak in the radiator, now excessive smoke

    All services on time.