Ducati MultiStrada 1200

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Paulvt1, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. Dr. Zaius

    Dr. Zaius Been here awhile

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    1. Does anyone know if the pikes peak edition comes with heated grips?
    2. Is this a bike you can put loads of miles on and still sleep at night knowing she is not secretly trying to self detonate in the garage as you sleep?

    I am really eyeing this as my next bike. I am coming from a bmw GS that I rode 99.9% on twisting paved roads and used for day/short touring events. I put on about 8,000 miles a year and with the bmw I never really cared how many miles I piled on it. I understand the 15k service interval but wanted some real info from owners that are racking up the miles on a 2010-2013 multistrada.
    Thanks for your help.
  2. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    1. No it does not but you can have them (Ducati Performance part) installed. $$250-$300 for the grips plus 2hrs+ to install.

    2. Yes, kind of, but keep a dealership close by just in case. That and an extended warranty. :D

    They are great bikes.
  3. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    1) No, not as stock from the factory.

    2) Lots of folks with 50k+ miles on their Mutleys now. These motors seem to be built for the long haul. Ask Dr Greg. He's got as many touring miles as anyone on them.

    I also came from a GS with mainly road miles. VERY different bikes. IMO, the Multi is more of a sport bike than adventure bike, so if you're a sport bike/tarmac guy, the Mutley is a great choice.

    Edit: ROFL. Olie, we gotta stop doing this. :lol3

    -SM
  4. expatbrit

    expatbrit Still pretty much a n00b.

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    I'd second the sport bike thing. I've had mine down dirt and gravel roads, but not much. Turns out I'm scared of taking the 500lb bike there, so I bought a 250 to do that on -- and still don't do much!
  5. evan3161

    evan3161 n00b

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    I saw there was a bit of chatter about this product a while ago. I recently installed one and did quite a detailed writeup over on Ducati.ms. Despite a few installation glitches (fully described) I think is a very good product and certainly enhances my experience in traffic nazi Victoria, Australia. BTW there is a group buy on at the moment at Ducati.ms - 20% off for the next 2 weeks I believe.
  6. Dr. Zaius

    Dr. Zaius Been here awhile

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    Yeah...I'm still have dirt orientated bikes. I am really looking for this as a sprout tourer. I just like the upright seating position and some travel on the suspension to suck up those road bumps.

    Thanks for the info guys.
  7. tonymorr

    tonymorr Malta,NY(Saratoga Spring)

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    I can't seem to find the details on a group buy. Might you have a link?
  8. GillT

    GillT Been here awhile

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  9. Dave.0

    Dave.0 Been here awhile

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    I can't comment on the new ones or the skyhook suspension. I have an early 2010 model. There were some well documented early teething pains- reflashes, pannier latches, fueling issues... Surprisingly I never really had any real complaints about the fueling after the initial 600 mile service. The biggest issue I had was needing a new shock ecu for the ohlin suspension when I had the DES preload error thing. Nothing ever stopped me from riding or was I ever stranded anywhere. I changed the oil at about 3500 miles, but other than that have just followed the factory recs - 7500,15000,22500,30000. I changed the chain and sprockets at about 28500 miles when the chain developed a tight spot. That's it. Currently at about 33500. I'd ride it anywhere without worry. The only thing I would change on the bikes is the scorpion trails, unless you like fixing flats.
  10. Dr. Zaius

    Dr. Zaius Been here awhile

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    This is precisely the kind of news I was hoping to hear. I totally understand the "little stuff" that happens on all bike models. Hearing 34k miles and counting on a multistrada 1200 makes me smile. It sounds like it is going to cost me about $20,000...but I'm sure my smile will only get bigger. :D
  11. Dr. Zaius

    Dr. Zaius Been here awhile

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    If you we're in my shoes and looking to make a purchase in the next 60-90 days...would you go for a discounted 2011-2012 model or pop on the 2013 with the twin spark and skyhook options?
  12. Pampero

    Pampero Verbose Adventurer

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    Much discussed issue that only you can decide. If money were no object, I'd buy a new one. If it were, I'd have no hesitation buying a 2012 left over (S version). And that is exactly what I did 3 months ago. The similarities are much greater than the differences, but the improvements are nice. I'm thrilled with my '12 and eager to ride it every chance I get, so no regrets.
  13. coast range rider

    coast range rider Been here awhile

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    If you were in my shoes, you would know that the low rpm running issues were the reason I never even bothered to test drive one.

    Skyhook makes more sense to me to firm up damping as soon as needed verses a handlebar switch only. So I'd say for your shoes, either get discounted '11-'12 base model (but don't!) or preferably, if your accountant permits it, splurge on the '13 Skyhook version. Maybe the '13 will save you the cost and effort of having to rework the rear shock for higher loads. Seals that are aging since time of manufacture should last up to a couple years longer on the '13. By the time you've spent thousands on replacement belts and valve adjustment labor, the little bit extra paid upfront for the '13 won't be so significant. Fianlly, do you really want to spend $20k on a bike with 2 year old tires?

    The last resort option to consider, if you must buy the bargain now, just trade up to '13 when more affordable used ones hit the market. This isn't the most sensible way to purchase though. It's as bad as worrying about resale value when buying a new bike...
  14. Dave.0

    Dave.0 Been here awhile

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    Well, there are many variables to consider in this question, and I haven't ridden the new one, but in typical Internet fashion I'll take a stab at this.

    I'd get the previous model with the ohlins. It's a super sweet set-up and I can't imagine the new suspension can be that much better, and I don't really like the idea that the "feel"of the suspension changes as you ride, but like I said I've never tried it so it might be good. But I do know that the ohlins are pretty amazing. That may be because I weigh about 160 pounds and it seems sprung just about perfect, I don't know. As I said earlier my bike never seemed to have fueling problems, and it certainly has more than enough power, so I can't imagine the new one is worth the difference in money, and I'd probably get the previous model even if money weren't even an issue.

    I don't think you could go wrong here, either way - ride and decide and don't look back.
  15. JNRobert

    JNRobert Breaking Wind

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    Took the '13 Skyhook out for a spin. Spent about an hour on mixed roads and speeds and I think I got a pretty good impression.

    The overall difference between my standard Marzocchi 2012 and the Skyhook is, I would say, subtle (and not necessarily for the better). But before I get to that, I'll talk about the modes.

    I haven't ridden the Ohlins version so this was my first experience on the changeable modes. The difference between Sport and Urban, for example, is significant and you're definitely getting a different bike (the engine mappings are also on my standard so this wasn't new to me). Personally, if I owned this bike I would program it to have the engine sport mode with the urban suspension setting. It is wonderfully plush and controlled and comes closest to the feeling of the standard bike.

    The sport mode just didn't work for me. It's choppy and not comfortable at all and would wear me out on my daily commute in no time. I run my 'Strada in the engine sport mode pretty much exclusively and love the responsiveness and the suspension seems calibrated to work well with it, I never wish for stiffer settings.

    Talking of the engine, the twin plug is maybe an improvement (perhaps a little smoother on throttle transition off the bottom) but there's still the hint of lean hunting on steady throttle. As mine doesn't have any of the issues I've read about on earlier models this isn't a big deal for me. The '13 is still a big lumpy performance twin (it hasn't morphed into a 1050 Tiger) and you'll know if that's something you can live with or not.

    When I got back on mine it did remind me how great the standard bike is. I think it's a wonder what they've done with that suspension. This might be a false impression but I felt the '13 was squatting much more than mine but perhaps the sag was way off :dunno

    If you already own a standard or Ohlins version, particularly the '12 model, I don't think you have anything to regret. If you love your currrent Mutly the Skyhook doesn't seem that big of a difference. If you're in the market for a new Multistrada the Skyhook is going to be fine - the bike still has all the attributes that make it great.

    YMMV :deal
  16. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    German publication Motorrad has posted a 50,000km teardown of the Multi online here.

    Reads quite well in google translate. Note there are five pages, including a response from Ducati.

    Basically, the Motorrad testers were happy with the state of the bike except that the big-end shells showed signs of wear, albeit within tolerance.

    The other issue they had was the exhaust flapper valve (i.e. noise reg beater) seizing solid, which demanded a replacement of the cat unit,

    Oh, and the chain lower run wore a groove in the swingarm, which also was replaced.

    That last problem perhaps gives a clue to the nature of the 50,000km ridden, as the tester admitted the sprockets had got saw-toothed and the chain was very worn and slack.

    So perhaps the big-end wear had arisen from cold-weather commuting with little warm-up time. Who knows.

    Rest of the motor was in great shape, and compression was higher than when new.

    50,000km ain't a lot, tho, in the scheme of things, especially given the price they are charging.
  17. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Interesting write-up. Particularly the bit about getting back on your standard and loving it. :lol3 Thank you.

    I suppose there is no reason why you would run in Sport on a bumpy commute, tho. I think that was the point made in that MCN article: you can leave it in Urban for comfort and still get plenty of control when needed. Save Sport for the ultra-smooth stuff when you want her to feel like a Superbike. Just a thought.
  18. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    For balance on the Multistrada's 50,000km teardown, here is a link to a similar piece Motorrad has done on the Yamaha Super Tenere.

    This is the model which UK mag Bike wrote up after a teardown at 80,000km (50,000 miles), the writers expressing astonishment at the low wear exhibited. However, a big proportion of that mileage was long-distance touring in the hands of travel writer Nick Sanders, and so you'd expect wear to be low as most in any engine occurs at start-up from cold.

    Nevertheless, I'd thought the Yam might come out of the Motorrad teardown better than the Ducati. Having taken a look, I'm not convinced that is so. Three exhaust valves leaking, a piston pin seized to the piston, a litre of oil used per 4000km and lots of carbon around the combustion chamber.

    This was a press bike that had gone through several different magazines over 10,000km before settling in at Motorrad, however.
  19. GB

    GB . Administrator

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    Don't forget that the SuperTenere was ridden without the recommended oil changes. If memory serves, he rode from Alsaka to Ushuaia, 3 times back to back in 100 days and had 2 or maybe 3 oil changes in 80,000 km. :huh That's serious abuse especially in the dirty riding conditions and using any grade of fuel he could find when the SuperTen is supposed to run on premium fuel. Motorrad called the engine kaputproof! :lol2
  20. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    As for that Motorrad article, nothing beats the Multistrada for on-road riding, and given the categories, I am not surprised at the first-place overall award.