Dumb reasons to get a 2012 over a 2013?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by ChildlikeWonder, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. ChildlikeWonder

    ChildlikeWonder Been here awhile

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    I'm looking to get my first motorcycle. I've ridden before, but only around empty parking lots and up and down the street. I'm going to take the rider's course we have here in VA, but after shopping around, I'm looking to get an R1200GS. I'm having a hard time deciding between the 2012 and the 2013, but am settling on the 2012 for 2 reasons: 1) I feel like the water-cooled aspect of the 2013 is one more system to fail, and I may join a coworker on his next roadtrip to/through Mexico at some point, and 2) I just think a 2012 Rallye edition is so darn good looking. But everything I read/watch does say the 2013 is slightly better in all categories. Is my reasoning poor?
    #1
  2. Thunder Pig

    Thunder Pig Been here awhile

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    Sounds like good reasoning to me as I got a 12 Rallye 6 months ago and dont regret it at all. It's a proven design, warts and all, and I dont want to be a test rider again. Added plus it will be cheaper than when I got mine.
    #2
  3. ChildlikeWonder

    ChildlikeWonder Been here awhile

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    Can I ask how much you paid? They're talking around 17k.
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  4. jachard

    jachard Been here awhile

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    I just picked up a Rallye and I think you could do a bit better on the price, based on my experience. I picked mine up in January..

    As far as the bike itself goes, it's AWESOME.

    Good luck and let us know how you do.

    Cheers, James
    #4
  5. cjack

    cjack Been here awhile

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    I bought a 2012 Rallye last summer and didn't give a thought to waiting for an LC...thinking of giving it a year to mature, etc. And that's fine. I did realize after reading about the LC GS that it is more than a water cooled bike. The new clutch, trans, etc. really solves a lot of possible issues that the Oilheads have suffered from. I think I would have bought the LC if I had the choice now. As it is, waiting a year or so at this point makes sense...and the Rallye really does look good. So I forced my self to wait :)
    #5
  6. dwestly

    dwestly Refuses to Grow Up!

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    Wow, this must be a Rallye fest! I bought my Rallye last summer as well. My 4th GS and I love it. I also just rode the 2013 GS and its awesome. It rides more like a Ducati Multistrada (which I've also owned) than the previous GS. However, as a first bike, the 2012 will be all you need and more. Also, like some others, I'm waiting a year or so, until any possible gremlins surface in the new wasserboxer model. If not, I'll probably move to the new model. For now though, my Rallye is great and all I need...besides, I'm also going to snatch up a new Ducati HyperStrada to add to the stable in a few months... :)
    #6
  7. dirty_t

    dirty_t Been here awhile

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    Just picked up my first GS. 2012 with 840 miles on it. I decided I liked it more than the new one. Lighter weight. More dirt oriented. More aftermarket farkle availability. More tribal knowledge about every imaginable aspect of the platform. Simple=good, air/oil cooling (also 'old school' is cool). The things the wethead does better I probably wouldn't even notice. I'm in learn mode. Loving it!
    #7
  8. KankakeeBenjamin

    KankakeeBenjamin Been here awhile

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    For your first bike I would buy a beater bike to warm up on. The gs is an expensive bike to repair. I am sure you are more than capable but there are a lot of little things to learn. I would buy a cheap 1k-2k bike to get started and then buy the gs. Just my 2cents and I hope you do get the gs sooner or later because it is a fantastic motorcycle.
    #8
  9. ChildlikeWonder

    ChildlikeWonder Been here awhile

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    From the reading I've been doing, the GS is only expensive to repair if you have someone else do your repairs. When people walked in my living room and saw this, their reaction was "oh, he's doing another build I guess *shrug*"
    [​IMG]

    I definitely agree I have a lot to learn, but the cost of ownership isn't really a concern for me.

    I've signed up for the 2-day Rider Training Program, and have pretty much decided on the 2012.
    #9
  10. Bluecomet

    Bluecomet What, me worry?

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    I'd have to agree with getting a smaller, less expensive, lighter bike to learn on. I'd sure hate to have multiple slow speed dumps on a brand new GS while learning cycle basics and balance. You'd be money ahead to get a jap bike that has already depreciated and has some battle scars on it to learn on. Have the patience and self discipline to practice, practice, practice in empty parking lots and light traffic back roads. If you get the right bike, you can put a few thousand miles on it and sell it for as much as you paid for it. That's also the safer way to go. Surrounded by traffic is NOT the place to learn how to ride a bike.
    #10
  11. El Gato

    El Gato Been here awhile

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    +1. A GS of any year is a WHOLE LOT of bike for a first-time rider. A 2-day course is not going to prepare you for managing a bike as tall and heavy as a GS in the real world.
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  12. cardoctor1

    cardoctor1 Been here awhile

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    makes the most sense
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  13. dirty_t

    dirty_t Been here awhile

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    You know I wasn't going to go where several others did, with all the 'better to start off on a smaller bike' stuff. A lot of what they said was based on cost of ownership, and repairing it if you (when you?) dump it. Some did mention the fact that there is also the safety aspect of it.

    Whether you can afford it financially or not; and whether you can tear it apart and put it back together in your living room or not isn't the issue at all. Riding a bike this size as a 'starter' bike is not a great idea, imho.

    This dialogue reminds me of my nephew, who at 27 or so went out and got himself a Yamaha R6. He said all his buddies were riding those or R1s, and, "gee Uncle Tom, it's just a 600." I looked at him and said after 8 years of racing lightweight superbikes I am still pretty sure I would have no clue about getting a 600 around a track at anything resembling well - and frankly, was a bit too chicken to try. He didn't seem to get what I was telling him.

    In any case, as I said above, I just got my GS - and I'm blown away by how powerful it is compared to what I've been riding most recently.

    There's a lot to riding a motorcycle safely. And there's a lot to doing it well enough that you can actually relax and enjoy it, which comes from the confidence of knowing that when things get sketchy, your reactions will be good, because you will have done a bunch of times things like braking, swerving, downshifting and deciding which one to do in a split second - sometimes all at the same time, even if you weren't paying full attention to what was going on around you.

    This bike - the R12GS - in my opinion, is not the bike that you will learn those things on if you are new to motorcycling. How long it takes different people varies a lot. But it definitely takes more time than riding around a parking lot and going to a two day course. Both are great starts to be sure.

    Big, heavy, tall and powerful - not really the ideal machine to find one's sealegs on. An F650 if you have to have a Beemer would be good. Or an SV650 or V-Strom might be worth a look, too.

    Or go for it with the big boy - keep us posted. Will be an interesting story to track either way. Good luck!
    #13
  14. ChildlikeWonder

    ChildlikeWonder Been here awhile

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    I know what you guys are saying is good advice, and in fact is what I've been telling the people who are guiding me on this, but the people who know me are saying to go straight to the 1200GS 1) because they say I'm responsible enough to not take on more than I can handle, and 2) because at 6'3" and big framed (size 13 shoe, but not really fat at 180lbs) I don't fit well on the smaller bikes. The local dealer I'm told has a good reputation for not letting you leave the parking lot if they don't think you can handle it, and I work with an experienced GS rider who is helping me along the way. I will say a friend of mine who had never ridden at all took the same course and then with only that experience drove about 160 miles from Northern Virginia to his home.

    I was actually telling the people who are giving me advice shouldn't I start with something smaller, but they've responded with that's generally true but not for you. So, at this point I've mentally committed myself and will let you guys know if I drop it. Where I live, there are a LOT of roads with almost no vehicular traffic on them that I can get to from my house without encountering vehicles, so I plan to put in a lot of time on those.
    #14
  15. CanadianTiger

    CanadianTiger Adventurer

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    You can be a mountain gorilla, doesn't matter... As a noob, it's a given you're gonna' drop it... Invest engine guards if you are bent on the GS
    #15
  16. KankakeeBenjamin

    KankakeeBenjamin Been here awhile

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    Then buy it. Life is short you can afford it go for it. I started out riding motocross as a youth and started on street bikes. I am 40 and have a lot of experience riding. Many of the people responding are probably similar and have also been riding for years. We are just giving you our 2cents thats all.

    You sound like you understand the dangers of riding otherwise you would not be asking. So buy the bike and be careful. Dont report back if you drop it just learn from your mistakes and be careful. Enjoy the gs I have the gsa and it is awesome. Good luck
    #16
  17. hillbillypolack

    hillbillypolack Grumpy Old Goat

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    I am also a bit of a purist in that I didn't want another system to potentially fail. The 2012 was / is my second GS after owning a 2007. I don't want for power or torque, the bike fits me like a glove (with small complaints about the seat), and goes exactly where I want it to go. IMHO, the 2012 is the best of the air cooled breed.

    The thing about the 2013 (water cooled version) is that it is a first year bike, so there may be some teething pains. I'd be curious to test ride one, maybe someday own one if they prove reliable. But I wouldn't wager my money on the first year.

    YMMV.
    #17
  18. Paul_R_Canada

    Paul_R_Canada Still Upright

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    None of us can really tell you what to do, but can tell you knowing what I know now, if I were buying my first, it would be no bigger than 4-500cc

    I, as many inmates, have been riding a while, for me more than 40 years, and I've ridin dirt ,enduro, street cafe, Goldwing, Harley and so on, and I can tell you I'd likely be dead if I started with a 600+ lb bike. I'm not trying to be dramatic because I have come off many of those bikes for a lot of different reasons, including things beyond my control (idiot in lane 2!)

    I was reminded of this when a neighbour and I spoke about her Harley sportster just towed home a few weeks back. She had previous experience but not for the last 30-40 years years, so she wants to get back that old groovy hippy experience, loud pipes, fun and buys this sportster, takes it out and gets two blocks, ditches it, hitting the side of a garage because She could not handle the weight, the power or have the calmness needed to stay cool while in a crisis. She hit she side of the garage and knocked herself out cold, 5 grand bike damage not to mention the side of the garage and lawn ... Well you can see.

    It's up for sale... And she's looking at a Honda 250 - she's lucky.

    You can always get a bigger bike, no rush, be safe. :freaky
    #18
  19. justinallen03

    justinallen03 Been here awhile

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    just do it. The bike has power, but it is extremely manageable. Sure if you turn your wrist hard enough, it'll wanna go. But it has gobs of low end putt-along torque and an extremely predictable, linear power band. Controllability is key, and I think this motor gives just that.

    Braking is top notch, about the best Ive ever ridden. Yeah, I haven't ridden for 95 years on 45 different bikes, but ive ridden cruisers, dirtbikes, sport bikes, sport-tourers, etc. IMHO that is more important than how much power the books say. Again, controllability...

    At 6'3", you'll have no problem handling its height. If I was a new bike rider, I think that would be the biggest obstacle as it sucks to fall over trying to get off your bike (yeah, it happens :1drink). On that note, this bike can take a fall. seriously. Put some crash bars, MaMo head covers, and a drive shaft slider and you're good. I've fallen a ton. And face it, you'll still have an 'oh shit' moment after riding for 10 years, so why wait (unless you never buy new).

    As far as which model, I would go 2012. Just as a disclaimer, I have a 2010 and I don't see anything that screams 'worth it' on the new one.
    #19
  20. dirty_t

    dirty_t Been here awhile

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    Ok. Short version.

    1. Bikes aren't fast, riders are.

    2. Size (of the rider) doesn't matter when you over cook a corner at a high rate of knots.

    3. Seat time will not make you a good rider. Lack of it, however, is the hallmark of a new rider. And new riders, in general, crash more than non-new ones.
    #20