easier tire changes - milling stock rims or replacing?

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by jimmy2020, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    Yes..but not recco because of the danger in a sudden flat. The pre-2005.5 are the worst, and its just the rear that's a problem. I have an 04 and simply took the tire off and remounted empty rim on the bike. Then I fired her up in 3rd gear like a lathe and used a hand file to grind about 1/4 of the safety bead off all round. It took about a half hour. Then I took a little more off about 6" long on the right side opposite the valve hole and marked the rim. I squirt a little WD40 in there and my bead breaker does the rest. I've never had it flat on the trail, but I practiced alot in my garage. I couldn't do it until I ground off some safety bead. I understand the 2005.5's are easier; about like any street bike to break.
    #21
  2. osteo

    osteo Motion is Life

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    Yup, plenty of good advice out there... I agee with Sailah
    If cheap works, then cheap it is :deal Dirtinblood and I (not sure where he got the idea, unless it was his...) we took a 4" belt sander with 80grit paper. Surprisingly it just fits between the beads. Turn on the sander, hold on carefully and sand away. Instead of sanding the entire bead around the rim, we did about a 9-12" section across from the valve stem so we knew where it was. Simple, cheap and effective like Sailah's method - but this had less sweat involved :D

    We followed the 80 grit with some 100-120 by hand just to smooth it out some more that that is it.

    Now, when we use the side stand (or centre stand) method we start at the grounded section and it works fine. Once the tire pops under the bead it is simple.

    D
    #22
  3. VintageThumper

    VintageThumper Gotta ride!

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    Valuable insites! I've got a set of '06 rims for Scropions and a set of the older, silver rims for knobbies. I'll chuck up the rear and file off some of that inner bead. I'm figuring I can put it in 6th gear with the throttle taped open and get 'er done in about 38 seconds! :evil
    #23
  4. wsmc99

    wsmc99 Been here awhile

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    After all the horror stories on the subject I just did it the other day.

    WTF is the big deal? It was no harder than any other wheel/tire to do!!!!

    If you take your time and pay attention to what you're doing it's pretty routine!
    #24
  5. cjracer

    cjracer AWD please!!

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    A video of this will be required for future review.:lol3
    #25
  6. Desmofan

    Desmofan Been here awhile

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    That's my boy!

    Does this mean I don't have to carry my 5 pounds of bead breaker in Baja this Fall-you're my personal tire changer ?:lol3
    #26
  7. katoosh

    katoosh Catch&Release Wild Trout

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    :rofl More is better!!

    This method is fantastic. I'll be spooning a rear next week, and I'll definitely budget an extra hour for this process.
    #27
  8. Seth S

    Seth S Will _____ for _____

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    I have only had to change one flat, though I have changed 2 sets of tires so far....all were done with just tire levers...and even though I tried the side stand trick I didnt have success. My plan is to just buy one of the bead breaker tools and take it with me on rides.

    [​IMG]
    #28
  9. VintageThumper

    VintageThumper Gotta ride!

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    Do you guys use the bead breaker that looks like a giant bicycle brake? I've only seen them in photos, and have wondered how big, and heavy they are...
    #29
  10. beemer boy

    beemer boy Oh no, he's gone Asian

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    Think some of these guys are doing bead breaking in air conditioned garages, not in the middle of nowhere bathed in sweat. I could not do it with only levers. Finally remembered the side stand trick which worked perfectly. Had a bunch of instant village helpers though. Never tried it by myself, think it would be a handfull.
    Upon returning home first thing I did was to mill off part of the locking bead as per Woody Wheel Works. Did about 8 inches on each side directly across from the valve stem using a router and a wooden jig. Details on this site somewhere with pictures. Very easy to break the bead now using only levers. I have a set of the giant pliers which are called the Tire Wizard I think. Works well in the shop but simply too large and heavy to take on a trip.

    Note the plastic bag disc protection device....
    [​IMG]
    #30
  11. ktmnate

    ktmnate Long timer

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    I found my 950 wheel to be absolutly the toughest to break the bead! Once broken, it's like any other tire to change. I couldn't do it with the side stand. I had the weight of the bike balanced on the sidestand which was on the sitting on the sidewall and nothing. That was after I tried on of the bead breakers.

    My son took this picture. You can see the centerstand off the ground:

    [​IMG]


    The only way I was able to break it was using a 2"x6"x12' piece of wood with another 4"x4" nailed it it about 2' from one end. I then wedged the plank under my car and the edge of the 4"x4" on the sidewall. The wood was making some cracking sounds before the bead let go. I have since ground some of that bead retainer off. With any luck, it will not be an issue.


    Nate
    #31
  12. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    I found that if you just set the sidestand on the very intersection of the outer rim and tire when you attempt to break the bead, it's a bitch as described. I usually try to scoot the foot of the sidestand under the rim, so the most pressure is right on the very edge of the tire/rim interface. Don't know if that description made sense...That and milling down the rim. And careful of the tube. DAMHIK

    Still takes bouncing up and down on the sidestand sometimes, not so sure that's the best garage method, but the only one that works in the field. I am a lot more careful to protect the rotor as well at 130 bucks.:puke1
    #32
  13. Nillbymouth

    Nillbymouth Been here awhile

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    Well, I've now tried 6 or 7 times to get my tyre off using this method but have failed at each attempt. Like Ktmnate, I have the bike balancing on the front wheel and sidestand with the centre stand off the ground. Sidestand is pushed under the wheel rim so it's as close to the edge of the tyre as possible. Plenty of WD40 squirted in the gap between tyre and rim. Valve removed and valve locknut slack.

    I've read all the threads I can find on this but still cannot break the bead. Does anyone have an idea of what I must still be doing wrong?

    Unlike some of you here I won't be left stranded 100 miles from the nearest road but I would like to be able to mend my own punctures on the side of the road rather than wait hours for a breakdown truck which probably can only mend tubeless tyres anyway.

    On a positive note, I can remove and refit my rear wheel in record time after all this practice!
    #33
  14. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    Try WD40: I have not done the sidestand trick. Instead I ground some of the safety bead off as discribed earlier. Then I use a bead breaker tool and still struggled. The tool guy told me to squirt some WD40 in there where I was prying and ...whoooooosh....came clean. I think WD40 penetrates somehow. Now I carry a mini can of WD40 to clean my chain and squirt my bead if fixing a flat. Test it in your garage first, though....:D -P
    #34
  15. kitjv

    kitjv "Old Guys Rule"!

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    Let me echo Pantah's response. I did my first rear tire change on the 950 last week. After removing the valve core from the tube, I slipped a tire iron between the edge of the rim & the tire bead & opened a gap. Rather than WD40, I brushed in some RuGlyde tire lube (available from Napa). I did this at several points all around the tire.

    Before resorting to the sidestand trick, I took a Bead Popper (a plastic oversized chisel available from place like Aerostich) & gave it a few good whacks with a hammer between the tire & the rim. Much to my delight, the bead broke loose immediately.

    Not only was I thrilled with the ease of breaking the bead, but knowing that I can easily pack the Bead Popper on the bike was a bonus.
    #35
  16. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    I believe that Woody will grind off or grind down the bead for a nominal amount.

    If you're gonna do the sidestand trick, make sure you do what Nate did - tie off the centerstand to the front wheel to keep it from folding under. If that bad boy falls when the stand folds, it's gonna give you fits. :evil

    I carry an old shower curtain with me on all trips. They're damn tough and will keep the dirt out of your wheels. It's also handy for wrapping up tire irons. Added weight is nothing.
    #36
  17. woody's wheel works

    woody's wheel works Built to Last

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    just read this funny quote,,,i'll try and dissect it,,,


    like i said we are ALL ears:ear :ear :ear :ear :ear

    BTW,,,at WWW we modify the bead 4-5 inches at the valve stem,,,not that it matters,,,as long as YOU know where it was modified,,,i believe this is a win -win scenario,,,opitimal tire retention with a built in bead-breaking spot

    we only remove the full bead for racers doing enduros who are more concerned with getting the tires fixed ASAP,,,and/or riders who demand it

    the larger safety bead on these big bikes DOESADD a measure of incresaed insurance of having the tire break off the bead,,,i've read and heard of accounts of riders going many miles on flats allbeit at reduced speeds...so there is something to be said for BIG FAT safety beads,,,til ya try to change the tube that is:wink:
    #37
  18. ktmnate

    ktmnate Long timer

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    That's a great idea! I'm going to have to explain to my wife that K7 said to use the shower curtain:rofl


    Nate
    #38
  19. PowerCell

    PowerCell Manufacture

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    One evening last year I helped Jimmy Lewis prep 40 wheel sets for the HP2 for the 1000. It took about 2 hours, and Jimmy schooled me on the proper way to swap Karoos. Basically no work stand, hold the wheel upright between your knees, only use 2 small irons (6" aluminum) and make sure the tire bead stays in the relief. All said, took about 2 minutes for him to mount the tire, which included 2 rim locks. It still takes me 10...

    He said if you need bigger irons, you're not keeping the bead all the ways in the relief.
    #39
  20. Evil Invader

    Evil Invader Been here awhile

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    Pics please!
    #40