Easy Peasy Bead Breaking - Tire Levers only

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by toolfan, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    I've read about this technique a few times lately - forgive me for not knowing from whom.

    Check it out - remove wheel, lay out some tools:
    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/1KJp28ss_Kv-GSKTbCx8ZA?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxjFH8tZI/AAAAAAAAEp0/Sfa159StVaQ/s400/DSCF9316.JPG" /></a>

    Put your levers in between the tire and rim, like so:
    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/mUJn3IXetqApBUGYumzMKw?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxjgYBQJI/AAAAAAAAEp8/P8ExueW9n-c/s400/DSCF9317.JPG" /></a>

    Now, push down on the outer two levers, and UP on the middle (black) lever:
    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Smnl8XfbeX_7xt2giFJtnw?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxkJsAuUI/AAAAAAAAEqE/DHHXp48RCS4/s400/DSCF9318.JPG" /></a>

    You can see it starting to peel away there. I had to space out my outer two levers a titch more.
    Easy as that -
    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/HtRc5a_0UYcxv0WlmXECYw?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxkcyBj4I/AAAAAAAAEqM/r-6yZaHBtXg/s400/DSCF9319.JPG" /></a>

    Almost no force required. :clap
    #1
    Idratherberiding likes this.
  2. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    Check out my new balancer/wheel adapter for balancing my r100gs wheel:

    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/9_9NgY2AEP9LvDmNFl9GCA?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxmZVP4eI/AAAAAAAAEqs/YGdn-V6ZFeA/s400/DSCF9323.JPG" /></a>

    A fellow inmate made that for me.

    Works good:
    <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/-lQmGb8xqx6BBdQ4fYMkog?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh4.ggpht.com/_5Pbryp6GOqI/SfZxmm4DzII/AAAAAAAAEq0/3j6VTuL-pXA/s400/DSCF9324.JPG" /></a>
    #2
  3. Skippii

    Skippii Milkshakes, my lad.

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,599
    Location:
    Richmond, Va
    How about for a tubeless?
    #3
  4. xdbx

    xdbx Motorcycle Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,503
    Location:
    NorCal
    :huh That is a tubeless rim.

    Off an 1150GS it looks like....
    #4
  5. R-A-M-O-N

    R-A-M-O-N Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    297
    Location:
    Buenos aires, Argentina
    Very nice, being a real noob at tire repair would you have one with a tube type were you see how to slip in the tube and tire?
    #5
  6. JDLuke

    JDLuke Ravening for delight

    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,644
    Location:
    New Jersey
    You would be best off checking out the thread 'Neduro's tire changing class' (well, it's really close to that, anyway). That goes into working with tubes, and the full process of the tire change. This technique is strictly one for popping the bead, which is just one (often difficult) part of the job. People resort to c-clamps, leaning sidestands on the tire, driving over boards laid over the thing, etc...
    #6
  7. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,441
    Location:
    Merritt Island, FL
    I like that method. I also break all beads with just a tire iron and one 10 1/2" spoon. I have always just worked around and around the rim a couple or three times, but I'll have to try this next time. Looks even quicker and easier than what I've been doing, and that way has been pretty easy & quick.(Except the one time I was doing a rear tire while trying to carry on a conversation with 1reddawg. I learned I can't talk and work a bead at the same time :shog )
    #7
  8. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    +1 to Neduro's thread, found here:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

    I took more pics of the process, but Neduro's thread is much better than I could do, and it's already out there.

    Tube type beads are much easier to break, but this technique will work for them as well.

    I've been a c-clamper, but this is much quicker and more efficient and it takes fewer tools. I think I you could probably do it on the bike, if you really wanted to.
    #8
  9. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    I actually took the photos on this myself - it's that easy. I was going to wait for my gf to take a photo, but I started to position myself to see how it would work, and I almost broke the bead just putting the levers in!

    So, I figured if it's that easy, I'd put the camera on a tripod and take the pic myself. :lol3
    #9
  10. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,441
    Location:
    Merritt Island, FL
    I often do mine on the bike to facilitate holding the wheel and being able to turn it as I go around. Then, just pull the wheel and get busy with the irons.
    #10
  11. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,785
    Location:
    California
    Lots of techniques as shown work fine on most bikes/tires/wheels .... but not all wheels/tires!

    I've changed a lot of tires in my garage on both dirt and street bikes for many decades.

    The other day I ran across a very stubborn one. I've changed rear tires twice on my DR650, no problem. Once on the side of the road. I was able to just stand on the tire and the bead broke. This with a Pirelli MT90 Scorpion tube tire and the stock Trail Wings broke down easy too.

    I got another set of wheels. The rear came with a nice Avon Distanzia. Near new. So I ran it. Got 8500 miles out of it. I bought another. Went to change it but could NOT break the bead on the old Distanzia. Keep in mind, the Distanzia is TUBELESS, but the wheel on the DR is for TUBE tires.

    I tried every bead breaking technique I know but no luck. I even rode the bike for half and hour. No dice. That bead would NOT POP.

    YES, the valve stem was removed. Dish soap was used.

    I've changed rear tires successfully on 17" sport bike tires (170 to 180 section) and been able to break the bead. But this Distanzia was tough.

    I finally took it to a local shop and they put it on the machine. POP! They got it! The guy said it was like it was glued on!

    I like the Distanzia but am reluctant to run it. How would I deal with a
    flat on the road? Sure, I can ride it flat (rides really well actually) but
    it gets very hot after a while.

    Any ideas or reasons why this tire was so tough? One clue: It was on this wheel for over three years, mostly unridden.
    #11
  12. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    What techniques did you try?

    I've tried a bunch of stuff in the past - this 3 lever method was only slightly more difficult than using the bead breaker that was on the HF, and only because it takes a little more set up time.

    I'm going to try it again on a friends bike in the next couple days - it's a mid 90s GS500 and I'm pretty sure it's the stock rear tire - so it's been on there for well over 10 years. :eek1
    We'll see how it goes.
    #12
  13. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,785
    Location:
    California
    I tried a few different methods.
    My tried and true method for tough tires is to use two 2x4's, one foot long piece and one 8 footer. I hook the long piece under my work bench and put the short piece on the tire, working close to the bench. Then lever onto the tire close to the rim using the 8 foot 2x4 hooked under the work bench to lever down on the short piece and onto the tire. Works very well. It sounds complicated but when you see it in action ... it's dead simple. Creates tremendous force.

    Using this method I was able to push the tire all the way down flat! ..... but the bead would NOT break.

    I also have an actual bead breaker which works OK on dual sport/dirt bike tires. No go with that either, in fact, not even close. This bead breaker is kinda of half assed but OK on dirt bike tires usually. The Distanzia was too
    tough.

    I also have really good tire irons and tried using all four. No dice. I have two
    18" ones and two Ty Davis irons (ones with the red handle). No luck. I used wood blocks to try to increase force/leverage. Nope. Tried forcing an iron past the set bead lip ... couldn't do it.

    I was able to do the front Distanzia easily. But this rear one would not let go. I've also mounted TKC's and D606's on my other set of wheels .... no
    problems with any of them either .... going off or on.

    Man, I would love a real Coate's tire machine! Makes changing tires FUN!!!
    #13
  14. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    Did you do the opposing directions thing with the levers?

    The tire I put on this wheel is an anakee - I used it on my old DR650, and I remember it being a pain in the ass to remove... we'll see how it goes in a couple weeks when I replace it again.
    :lol3
    #14
  15. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Oddometer:
    8,518
    Location:
    Auburn, CA
    Even minute amounts of corrosion on the beads can make breaking the damned things nearly impossible. For whatever reason, the AVon tires seem to be more succeptable to this. Dunno why.
    I use the Tyre Pliers bead breaker, and it's never let me down.

    http://tyrepliers.com.au/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=1


    One thing to be careful of when using the (very good) method whon by the OP is that the levers will occasionally slip out and find their way to your forehead at a high rate of speed. I've been in the tire biz for a long time, and have the scars to prove it.:deal
    #15
  16. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    When I did it the other night, I only used finger pressure on the middle lever.

    I'm pumped to try this out on something more difficult - probably tomorrow night. I'll report back. :wink:
    #16
  17. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,543
    Location:
    NoPo (pdx)
    Unfortunately, my camera shit the bed this evening, so no pics.

    But - we used this technique on a friends bike - a '90something GS500, 16k miles, original tire.

    It was on there like glue, but by working around the tire (only about a quarter of the way around, actually) we got it off. Tire off, wheel balanced, new tire mounted and wheel replaced along with a chain replacement in about an hour and a half, in a tutorial "this is how to work on your bike" session (going slow, inexperienced wrench, although, I did most of the tire work as a "demonstration).
    #17
  18. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,882
    Location:
    Berzerkeley, CA
    Django, I had the same experience with a set of gripsters that had been on a xr600 for about 10 years. It took me 4 hours to get the tires off, and about 45 minutes to get new ones on- it made changing tubeless 1100GS tires look easy.

    Normally tubed tires seem easy to change- at least on my DRZ, it's a quick, easy job.
    #18
  19. Dark Helmet

    Dark Helmet Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    903
    Location:
    You'll know when I know...
    Ok, this tip is at the top of my list of great advice I have recieved on ADV rider. I hate changing tires and resorted to having my rear tire mounted for me the last time, which I hated to do (but boy was it easy!).

    I changed my front tire last night and used this method. I couldn't believe how easy it was!

    Thanks, and I have passed this tip on already.:clap
    #19
  20. R_W

    R_W wannabe

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,126
    Location:
    Kansas
    It works with 2 irons (one up, one down) as well. Scissor them, wiggle them around the bead a little further (like a quarter inch) and do it again.

    I find that it works best with the curved end pointing down into the bead.

    Thanks for taking the pictures and explaining it much better than I could.
    #20