Economics of reloading ammo(e)

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Aurelius, Mar 16, 2009.

  1. HardCase

    HardCase winter is coming

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    One day last summer I was at my range and a guy there was shooting a very tacticool AR and was having some FTF issues. I asked what the deal was and he said that he'd handloaded 100 rounds and that some of them weren't working. I asked if I could look at them and he said sure. What became readily apparent was that he'd used a fairly diverse mixture of brass, WW, Rem, Federal, and PMC IIRC. I noticed that a lot of the primers looked funky, like they'd been crushed during seating. Then I realized that some of the brass had originally had crimped in primers and that he'd decapped them, but hadn't swaged or reamed out the primer pocket crimps, had simply seated new primers, and they'd been damaged in the process, crushed. I pointed this out to him and he was a little embarrassed. He said that he'd noticed some trouble seating primers but hadn't given it a whole lot of thought, just jammed them in there. I asked if any had detonated during the reloading process and he said no, that hadn't happened, but apparently some of them were damaged so that they would not fire when struck by the firing pin. So......lesson here? Make sure the primer pockets are addressed if you are handloading brass where there is a crimp!! :huh:deal
  2. Motor31

    Motor31 Long timer

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    You actually have two categories there. The best option would be to use the 230 gr slug (cast lead) as that is going to be the cheapest slug in the same weight as the factory load. Then set the load to get the standard velocity of 850 to 900 fps and that will duplicate the "standard GI" factory load.

    I do the same with my loads. I want to duplicate the performance of the HP loads in my 40 so I load the same weight slug, cast, as the "duty" or factory loads I carry for CCW.

    The 200 or 180 gr slug would be a bit cheaper in 45 acp but only because of the cost of the lead itself. Less lead per 1000 slugs equals less cost but that's about it. It should shoot to a different point of impact and have slightly lighter recoil. In your case you want to duplicate the factory so equal performance is the key issue. The recoil would be the same as would the POI. Best practice for what you want, cheaper shooting and have the same expectations of performance of factory load.
  3. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius 1.5 Finger Discount

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    Yeah, I guess where I'm at is is the cost difference between 200 & 230gr bullets per 1000 enough to matter?

    I plan to scavenge as many wheel weights as possible, etc. but will probably end up buying some too.
  4. McNeal

    McNeal Long timer

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    http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=5&secondary=13

    Missouri Bullet has 200gr SWC for $39.50 per 500 and 230gr RN for $43.00. That's 7.9 and 8.6 cents per bullet respectively.
  5. VTSteve

    VTSteve Been here awhile

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    I'm using virgin Lake City 5.56 brass, but they've been trimmed and FL resized. I also realized the rounds I was having trouble with were 40 Gr, not the 60's I thought they were. Since the 62 Gr M855 I have is dead reliable, I'll try loading up some of the 60's and see if they're any better. I was using the 40's becuase I figured they'd be a little less devastating on the coyotes these loads are intended for.
  6. HardCase

    HardCase winter is coming

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    If there is a FTF I would not think bullet weight would make a difference. It might affect functioning of a semi-auto, but the gun would at least fire. Usually a FTF is a primer, headspace or firing-pin issue. However, it might be possible for a very short bullet, like a 40, to have an impact on head-space, especially if the shoulder of the rounds was set back in resizing. It's possible that the longer bullets, like a 60 or greater, would enter the throat of the bore sufficiently to make up for excessive headspace in the brass.
  7. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    I thought he meant "failure to feed". :dunno
  8. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    +1
  9. VTSteve

    VTSteve Been here awhile

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    Yes, that's what I mean.
  10. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    Do the rounds with the 40gr. bullet have enough energy to fully overcome the bolt return spring?
    Or does the bolt stop without going back far enough to pick up the next round?
  11. HardCase

    HardCase winter is coming

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    Oh, okay, that's a horse of a different color. Failure to feed.....meaning, I assume, that the next round in the mag is not picked up.....is probably due to insufficient gas/pressure from the round, and yes, a 40 grain bullet in a 223 could well be the problem.
  12. S.t.t.G.

    S.t.t.G. Mind over metal...

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    I'da asked him what gods he prays to....:jump

    ...cause they were puttin' in some O.T. with that one...
  13. fyrfytr

    fyrfytr B.U.F.F.

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    [​IMG]

    Also, scored this for $15.00 today. Just need to make a stand for it.

    [​IMG]
  14. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius 1.5 Finger Discount

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    Damn!

    Wacha reloadin? :ear
  15. fyrfytr

    fyrfytr B.U.F.F.

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    .45 acp for now. Picked up some 9mm lead bullets, but I need small pistol primers. I'll also be doing .223 when I get some bulletts. Damn, I thought this was supposed to save me money.:lol3
  16. McNeal

    McNeal Long timer

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    From the photo I thought those were .455's for a webley. They look real stubby.
  17. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius 1.5 Finger Discount

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    Cool!

    Gonna swing by bass pro tomorrow to scout for a couple of things.
  18. fyrfytr

    fyrfytr B.U.F.F.

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    Be careful, I lose time in stores like Bass Pro and Cabella's. I go figuring I'll spend 2 hours walking around. I'll check out the hunting section, and of course the gun library. When I check the time, usually 4 or 5 hours has passed.:lol3 It happens all the time.
  19. fyrfytr

    fyrfytr B.U.F.F.

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    Maybe just the angle? Here they are next to some Remington UMC. Funny, I was looking at an old Colt chambered in .455 Eley yesterday.

    [​IMG]
  20. HardCase

    HardCase winter is coming

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    Looks like you put a very light roll-crimp in those with the standard 45ACP die. Speaking of spending more money, if you are going to be shooting a lot of 45ACP you might want to consider investing in a dedicated taper-crimp die for that caliber. Rounds loaded for a semi-auto, as opposed to a revolver, headspace on the case mouth.