Elefant Technical Thread

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by motomikedh, Feb 28, 2008.

  1. christian

    christian Exchange your GPS Track!

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    if it has the stock carbs, it should be 2 cables.

    one to pull (accelerate) and 1 return to close. Sometime the closer is used in place of the opener one if that one broke.
  2. rob94010

    rob94010 Adventurer

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    Well, I have been running one cable and the carbs are stock. I should have the bike apart this week and will go to Motion Pro to have cables made. I suppose they are not the same length?
  3. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    No, they are not the same even though they look very close. The connector sizes are different.
  4. fallzboater

    fallzboater Kiss My Shiny Metal Ass

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    I found this too, but was since told that you can remove the flanges from the cam (driven) pulleys easily enough, which will make belt changes much easier.
  5. sethro

    sethro Been here awhile

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    Hello All

    Do you guys happen to know the race- tec part # for the 94 Elefant????

    Thanks

    Sethro
  6. sethro

    sethro Been here awhile

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    ok, I mean the Gold Valve /Race-Tech part # for the front forks, also what oil level in the forks have you had good sucsess with?

    Thanks
    Sethro
  7. sethro

    sethro Been here awhile

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    Found it , it is part # FMGVS2520

    Thanks All

    Sethro
  8. christian

    christian Exchange your GPS Track!

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    I'd be curious to see the lowest price you find...
  9. Durangoman

    Durangoman Yeah its me!

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    Durango
    My battery light is on and I dont know why...

    Bike has electrical upgrades-- headlights, starter. I installed a volt meter and I am getting juice, plenty of it. 3500+ rpms it gettign between 14-15v, (more on the 15side). The battery is staying charged and the bike starts in a milisecond.

    Took off on a 202 mile ride today and brought along the digital volt meter.
    Bike sitting unstarted for a week battery was: 12.58volts
    30miles later 12.88
    Other readings throughout the ride: 12.89 then 12.9, and at 202miles 13.1v. 45 mins later: 12.98v

    The battery is getting juice and keeping it. My diagnostic battery charger isnt indicating a short cell or anything. Any ideas why that battery light is staying on?
  10. gasgasman

    gasgasman Been here awhile

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    TRY LETKO IN KASAS CITY KS. THEY SEEM TO HAVE ALOT OF THE OLDER DUCATI ELPHANT PARTS. THERE NEW PH.#913=442-3336
    WEB WWW.LRTKO.COM
    THEY ALWAYS HAD THE PIECES FOR MY ELEPHANT WHEN I HAD ONE.
  11. Cauldron

    Cauldron Now in DESMODROMIC!

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    Sounds like a bad connection at the voltage regulator. You may well be getting 13 volts but the regulator dosen't think so. Check the ground at, and the positive wire going to, the regulator.

    Good luck.
  12. fallzboater

    fallzboater Kiss My Shiny Metal Ass

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    The e900 has the most finicky rear brake to set up of any bike I've owned, and after some trial and error I finally kicked it in the ass, so here are some tips which I wish I'd had earlier:

    To get a really good bleed, take the tank and bash plate off, and unbolt the two clips holding the brake hose to the swingarm. Remove the rear wheel and raise the caliper to get as much of the hose running up from the m/c towards the caliper as possible. I use a Mityvac when starting with a dry system, but it shouldn't be necessary for a typical bleed.

    With your tubing and box-end wrench on the bleeder, pump with your foot several times, then crack and close the bleeder while pushing down on the rear brake lever. Hold the caliper first with the banjo down, then with the bleeder as the high point. Repeat until satisfied that you've got a good bleed.

    The real trick is getting the best adjustment at the m/c pushrod. Too loose and the lever will hit the bash plate or frame, too tight and fluid won't return from the m/c to the reservoir, and you'll cook your pads in short order. After loosening the pushrod locknut, you should be able to easily twist the pushrod by hand. Turn it out (CCW) until you feel the top of the rod meet the bottom of the m/c piston (zero free play). At that point I started to test if the caliper pistons could be pushed in easily by hand. I was able to turn the pushrod out (negative free play) almost another full turn (5 out of 6 flats), where it started to become difficult to push the caliper pistons in. I ended up tightening the locknut with the pushrod at 2/3 turn out (4 flats) from zero free play (yours may differ). This adjustment easily allows the brake to lock the rear wheel without the lever hitting the bash plate.

    If you've successfully done the rear, the front is cake. The only tricky part is that you may have an air bubble at the junction of the single line from the lever and the lines to each caliper.

    Note that the rear caliper is interchangeable with the left front, and the front and rear brake pads (three sets) are all the same. The pads are identical to those used on the front of a KTM 950 Adventure. Easy to find. I'm using KTM-branded organic pads, which are cheap and give reasonable performance on the street, and are not too touchy in the dirt. Changing pads is done by driving the retaining pin in the rear of the calipers from the outside in with a pin punch. The pads can probably be changed with the wheels and calipers on the bike, but it's worth cleaning and greasing the pins and slider rods at each pad change (at least).
  13. flygirl

    flygirl n00bius maximus

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    Hi Mahouts!

    I'm enjoying riding Stampy so much that I'm thinking about riding through the winter. Or at least the parts of it that aren't in three feet of snow. However, I get cold, so I want to get advice on what heated gear I can attach to my 'fant... Anyone out there tested any of it? I'm thinking heated grips or gloves, and heated jacket liner.

    Advice welcome!
  14. Adventure Kitty

    Adventure Kitty Tuna Gatita Blanca

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    You should not ride your heffalump in the snow. [​IMG]

    Stampy is a heffalump, not a mammuff.

    This is a mammuff. They are very different.

    [​IMG]
  15. flygirl

    flygirl n00bius maximus

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    <giggle>But Kitty, Stampy must earn his peanuts!</giggle>



  16. Durangoman

    Durangoman Yeah its me!

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    interesting bike
  17. M700

    M700 Been here awhile

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    That may well qualify as the ugliest bike I've ever seen. Including choppers and mid 1980's Japanese Cruisers. Not sure it tops that cruiser that BMW built though... But close...

    What is it???
  18. Adventure Kitty

    Adventure Kitty Tuna Gatita Blanca

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  19. Donkey Hotey

    Donkey Hotey De Jo Momma

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    Sorry, I have to keep a better track of where the cat's been on here. She's been searching for a Munch all day. This explains it. :bluduh
    This is both a general question (what heated gear?) and specific question (will the 'lump...I mean 'fant run it?).

    Heated gear (my opinion): I'd go for a full jacket (liner) over just a vest. It's only slightly more wattage and means a nice layer of warmth down the back and front of your arms. It also means that the plugs for the gloves are already in place at your wrists (rather than fishing the wires down your sleeves). I've been very happy with my Gerbing stuff.

    I prefer gloves over heated grips. Heated grips are nice when you get caught on a cold afternoon but you can't grip them hard enough to warm your hands on a really cold day (got 'em on my BMW but still run the gloves instead if I've got 'em). Gerbing heated gloves are comfortable and warm on their own. The wires run down the back side of your hand and down each finger. That's where it's nice to have the heat. Those things rule.

    A third piece (that I don't think you can afford electrically) is the heated pants. They fit under my Aerostich and create just that much more warmth. For the really nasty days, I've even got their socks. Mmmm...warmer than a kitty fart in the Aerostich and doesn't smell like fish. :D

    With the full suit (gloves, jacket and pants) it sucks more wattage than the 900 Ducati engine can feed. That leads to your specific application. I'd say that if you run the low beam (single lamp) and stock wattage bulbs, you should be able to run the jacket and gloves. The jacket is 77 watts and the gloves are 27--104 watts.

    Considering that the second headlight bulb sucks 55 watts, you could keep the bike on low beam and need only 50 additional watts to warm your upper body. That should still leave something to charge the battery.

    It's close but it should make it. I might consider the DDL wiring upgrade though. With the additional load, your charging system will be running full-tilt-boogie. That'll heat up wires and connectors, causing the same failures people have seen from running both headlights and high wattage bulbs.

    Now for the irony: the 650 Elefants actually have more charging output--400 watts IIRC. That was a cool little (big?) bike.
  20. fallzboater

    fallzboater Kiss My Shiny Metal Ass

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    Oddometer:
    511
    Location:
    Hood River, OR
    I'm fairly warm-blooded, and do pretty well with just an old Widder vest and heated grips at least into the low 30's. The nice thing about the grips is that they're always on the bike, and allow you to wear non-insulated gloves in much cooler temps. Having hand-guards on the bike helps a lot on the highway, too. The vest allows you to cut out a layer or two of fleece or other insulation, and is most effective if you get it kind of snug and wear between a base layer and an insulating layer.

    I just today ordered two of these LED battery monitors, one for the 'Fant, and one for the 'Priller:
    http://www.customdynamics.com/LED_battery_gauge.htm#LED_Battery_Gauge_with_Remote_Flush_Panel_Mount_LED
    The 'Fant has an upgraded r/r, but I'm not sure how much heated gear it will take, yet. It's also wired to run both lamps on high and low beam off the starter cables. The 'Priller wiring has been beefed up, but it's still finicky about charging in cold temps with vest, grips, and headlights all on high, and it's a higher-compression 996 twin. With the monitor I'll be able to at least make sure that, if necessary, I power down enough my last few miles to work in the morning, to be able to restart 10 hours later. Carrying a small Battery Tender or mini lamp-cord jumper cables isn't a bad idea, and I keep whatever bike I'm using in the winter on the Tender at night, so I'll have a full charge when I take off.