Enduralast from Euro Motoelectrics

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by BlackHoof, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. Indian

    Indian Been here awhile

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    Another advantage of the coventional system would be the number of small roadside workshops in remote parts of the world which would actually rewind the rotor or stator for you if needed.
    This reminds me of a guy I met about 20 years ago with a Suzuki with a flat battery. This bike model was never sold in Norway.
    I took him to a shop which rewound his stator and he managed to continue his journey.
    #61
  2. Indian

    Indian Been here awhile

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    If airflow and overheating is the issue, have a look at the Lima Controller that is mounted where the regulator. This controller does away with both the regulator and diode board.
    This controller can be found at the Silent Hektik site which is linked from my page.
    #62
  3. Donkey Hotey

    Donkey Hotey De Jo Momma

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    The Enduralast has fewer components so in the end, it would be the easiest to figure out for someone not comfortable with electrics:

    1) Measure the battery voltage while the engine is running. Is it over 13 volts at about 2500 RPM? If so, everything is fine.

    2) If it's not, unplug the Enduralast stator from the regulator. Start the engine. Measure between each of the three wires (AC scale). Do you have about 15-18VAC between ANY pair combination? If so the stator is good, replace the regulator rectifier unit.

    3) If any pair of windings is not putting out full voltage, replace both components because there is no way for a mortal to check the regulator rectifier unit.

    It's simple to troubleshoot but not cheap. So if the Enduralast fails, you're replacing about $400 worth of parts. By comparison, you'd spend a similar amount to replace a stator and rectifier/regulator on a Honda so it's not unreasonable--just not palatable to me.

    OTOH, the stock and Omega systems use many inexpensive components but are more complicated to troubleshoot. IMO getting rid of the stock diode board and ground jumper harness fixes all of the "problems" with the stock system. Beyond that, it's a reliable design. The Omega is just more output.

    All the talk about brushes is just whining. As I posted before, every car on the road uses the exact same design. If brush wear really weighs heavy on somebody's mind, check them before a long trip and carry a spare set.

    I went to GREAT trouble to move the second rectifier on my 86 Goldwing to test that theory. They regularly failed at 60K intervals. After running 8 gauge wire to the back of the bike, I mounted the rectifier to the back of the license plate bracket. It didn't help a thing.

    That one failed at 60K as well (with no warning--and the bike had a stock digital voltmeter). THAT is exactly why I am so opposed to fixed magnet charging systems. We've debated this to death. I just wanted to jump in and present an opposing view.
    #63
  4. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    This is great info. Thanks Greg and Indian.

    Greg, what diode board would you recommend? Would the Lima Controller
    Indian recommended fix the diode board problems?

    Indian, the info. on the Lima Controller is in German. Do you know of an English version? And do you know the price?

    Thanks again guys.
    #64
  5. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    Also, I heard about using a Police model voltage regulator to allow charging at lower rpm's. Anyone know if this is true? It would mean I could cruise at lower revs and not worry about my charging system not charging.
    #65
  6. Donkey Hotey

    Donkey Hotey De Jo Momma

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    I have no direct experience with any of the aftermarket solutions for just the diode board. My 88 blew the rotor. I bought a replacement from Motorrad Electrik. For the diode board, I machined my own retrofit bracket to fit a GM diode block in there, then made my own rectifier harness. I believe that is the basic idea behind the Thunderchild and maybe others.

    That solution gets you all of the wattage the system is capable of but remember that it doesn't buy you any MORE wattage. In perfect condition, the stock system is still too weak for high current accessories like driving lights and electric clothing. That's why I went to the Omega.

    I know nothing about the Lima controller. Indian? We'll turn it over to you...
    #66
  7. Indian

    Indian Been here awhile

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    I have tried to translate using Babelfish and after editing to a more English friendly text using my extremely limited German.
    'The SH lima controller-Micro chip automatic controller with a low-loss electric rectifier. Developed for the Martinek Guzzi, which participated with the 24h von LeMans. Improved early load characteristic with higher efficiency under 2000 U/min.'
    [​IMG]

    The unit pictured is for the Guzzi. The graph below applies to both models.
    Check out the dealer Motoren Israel site which is also linked from my site. There is an English catalogue there too.
    [​IMG]

    SH-K=SilentHektik Lima Controller
    B-R= Authority automatic controller(police model)
    ST-R. = Seriel Transistorized Regulator
    SK-R. = Seriel Standard Regulator


    The price for the unit: R4132 lima controller 12V 37A with cooling fins €167.00
    #67
  8. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    Same applies to the Enduralast stator, Injun! Actually, that one would be a lot easier to rewind ...

    I don't think there's a clear choice between the two systems: as I've said a squillion times, if I was leaving for Siberia the next day I'd probably install the Omega system because it has a longer track record. It's also plug-and-play, and anyone who understands the BMW charging system will find it easy to check out since it works the same way.

    As it is, I won't be crossing Siberia any time soon, I do all my own bike work anyway, and I've installed the Enduralast system. It helps that I know a fair bit about electronics, and feel confident installing and troubleshooting this system. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who is not comfortable soldering connectors, as shoddy installation could lead to rapid failure. However, a properly installed system is, in my opinion, unlikely to fail.

    Someone mentioned cooling: yes, cooling airflow is critical to the regulator, and indeed to all semiconductors ... failure rate at 110°C is about 35x failure rate at 55°C. This is the main problem with the stock diode board location inside the front engine cases. I'm amazed the Omega system doesn't relocate the diodes somewhere more sensible.

    -----sharks
    #68
  9. Rogue Scout

    Rogue Scout Instigator Deluxe

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    Okay, I've made a decision - I'm going with Enduralast for 2 reasons.

    1. It is less expensive. Alot less expensive right now.

    2. I'm not going to Bungle Bungle Kilimanjahara anytime soon.

    Okay, 3 reasons. The "test pilots" here don't seem to offer any real reservations about either system.

    Thanks to all for your information, great logic on both sides, but in the end, both seem to be well suited to my application and one of them is over $100 cheaper.
    #69
  10. Malindi

    Malindi Zen Adventurer

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    Just updated ...

    Feb 1, 2006

    http://tinyurl.com/aydkf

    After a few thousand miles, the next step is to move the Enduralast over to the G/S. I contacted John and got a spare rectifier to take along on the trip. Mounting the rectifier proved unexpectedly easy. I was dreading having to fight for space under the Acerbis tank where I'd only last week managed to squeeze in an alarm system. A visit to my welder netted the simplest of solutions. After debating a bracket welded to something given the tank's hogging of all the frame space, he suggested an aluminum plate right behind the battery. That would allow the battery straps to catch the plate and provide a mounting surface for the rectifier. Since it's about as close as you can get to the battery, this seemed an excellent plan. Below is a pic of the aluminum plate. It's 5.5 X 7 inches. It sits right along the battery (which is the same size) and fits snugly between the battery box and the battery. The rectifier points backwards towards the rear fender. It's completely in the open and does not interfere with anything. I run a full toolbox under the seat, FWIW. The wiring runs downwards. Come to think of this, I should have followed the same system on my RT. I run a smaller diameter Odyssey PC 680 and there is a LOT of room at the front of the battery to do something similar.

    [​IMG]
    #70
  11. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    I have had one of the EnDuraLast sytems on my hack rig all winter up here in Milwaukee and it has been doing great!
    I have a 1982 R100RT with the fold-out fog/driving lights (55w ea, only one turns on at a time), a 55w headlight on the chair, as well as the extra tail/brake light, turn signals, heated grips, and my new GF has commandeered my 'lectric vest when she rides in the chair...:wink:

    I can run with everything turned on above 4,000rpm with no problems.

    Because I know that A/C current doesn't suffer as much loss traveling over distances, (That is why your house gets A/C current) I put my Rectifier/Regulator back by the battery. Gets it away from the heat of the engine, very short D/C path to the battery, lots of cooling air back there, and plenty of space.

    The bullet connectors were all cut off and replaced with Posi-Lock connectors wherever a wire needed to be extended/joined. Same for the stator plug. They have a great solid mechanical grip, are field removable/reusable, and don't require any special tools. I have used them for quite a while in many applications with great results. www.posi-lock.com

    Tapped into switched power at the coils. Right out in the open and handy, and on the dual-coil models, there is even an empty terminal on top of the coil just waiting for a female blade connector to be put on! Though I may change that and take it up into the headlight shell and plug into the contact board inside of there... Get the connection out of the elements, and reduce the miniscule chance that any additional draw on the coil feed wire will affect ignition performance. But it hasn't that I have noticed...

    I will try to get some pictures of my installation posted over at my site and let you all know when they are up.

    Malindi - That plate looks like a good idea. Just make sure that you have countersunk fasteners on back so you don't wear a hole thru your battery case... :huh

    Attached Files:

    #71
  12. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    Hey Karl, thanks for the info. Is that a rubber mount I see for the rec./reg.? If not, I wonder if that would be a good idea.
    #72
  13. Malindi

    Malindi Zen Adventurer

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    It's the stock rubber mount for the battery, with a small addition for the rectifier.
    #73
  14. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    So, would it be a good idea to rubber mount it, or would it not make a difference?
    #74
  15. Malindi

    Malindi Zen Adventurer

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    It probably makes very little difference. The most important parts are cooling (free airflow) and a proper ground to battery negative. And the shorter the wires are to the battery from the rectifier, the better. I thought the wires had to be short to the rotor, else I would have mounted my rectifier elsewhere on the RT.
    #75
  16. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    The mount is a 6mm "Rod Coupler Nut" Basically just a really really thick 6mm nut to replace the one holding the battery box to the stock rubber mount.
    Down at the bottom is a 1" diameter clamp with a small angle bracket. The only thing that shows once the side cover is back on is the rubber covered clamp strap just below the cover.

    I don't think that rubber mounting the Regulator/Rectifier is needed at all. It is all solid-state and fully potted.

    The Coupler nut is the second generation mounting concept in that area, if you can't find a metric Coupler Nut you can just put an extra bend in a second 1-1/2" angle bracket to make a Z-bracket like this....
    (if you have the old battery mounts with two short threads, it would be better to buy a new one with one long threaded side to give more grip length.)

    Attached Files:

    #76
  17. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    BTW - Here is what I was talking about for tapping into power at the coils on dual-coil models.

    The red wire runs back to the Rectifier/Regulator, and as you can see there is actually a blank male terminal on the coil where the Green w/Blue stripe wire attaches.
    Nice handy access to switched power!

    (the hardware cloth over the air intake horns is to keep critters from nesting in my air cleaner...)

    Attached Files:

    #77
  18. BlackHoof

    BlackHoof REMF

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    Good idea on the hardware cloth. I once found a ton of dry dog food stashed in my air cleaner housing on one of my bikes. :D
    #78
  19. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    Mine was stuffed with wadded paper toweling and the buggers had started chewing on the filter element to make more nesting material! :gun2

    On top of the cleaner housing you can see my first pass at a power distribution panel for all the extra lights and everything else on the bike...

    Attached Files:

    #79
  20. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

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    Just another view showing how you pinch the material together in the middle and hold it all on with some zip-ties...

    (So, how does one embed photos in the text like the others seem to be able to do? I know... newbee question... )

    Attached Files:

    #80