Engine Jacks

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by brocktoon, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    I've been groused at by gurus, but I sometimes use the belt-and-suspender approach to gaskets and sealants. I rub a very faint amount-- like suntan lotion on your skin-- silicone sealant into the gasket. Rub it in with the thumb and index finger. The gasket does it's job and the sealant is a backup. And next time the part is disassembled, the sealant works as a release compound and the used gasket simply unpeels instead of needing to be scraped off.

    Clean everything off and do the old talcum powder trick. Just to make sure it isn't leaking from somewhere else. Engines sometimes have "porous castings", so keep that in mind.

    And again, the cover plate could be warped, so next step is to check that. Or seepgae from the clutch release assembly. Or a loose kickstart idler gear shaft (if you've got a kicker).

    --Bill
    #21
  2. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer

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    Little bit of lacquer thinner, the brush on ultra 300 gets thick as the bottle gets used, so it doesn't lay as smooth/thin. Tiny bit of thinner and stir like hell makes it the good smooth consistency ya like to have.
    #22
  3. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    Like Bill said, I use an almost undetectable smear of silicone on the gasket.

    We've had a couple of people break the shift spring while on a ride in the boonies. The answer (when you don't have any way to work on the transmission) is to pull the transmission, turn it upside down, shift into third (low enough to get going yet high enough to do a bit of speed), put the transmission back in and get home. We had one fellow that didn't have any tools at all, he took off the gas tank and as much gear as he could. He and his buddy turned the whole bike most of the way upside down and again, shifted into third then was able to ride home. I bet he never forgot that one.

    Best way to pull the transmission, like has been said by others, is to move the swing arm back. The repair manuals had it wrong because they just repeated what had to be done on the /2s.
    #23
  4. kaput13

    kaput13 gasoholic

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    Airhead tech at its finest.:freaky
    #24
  5. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I did that once on an engine swap in an old beetle.
    #25
  6. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    I have a "special tool" made of a 2x2 wooden block about 4" long with a shallow notch in each end. It goes between the swingarm and a lower frame crossmember and holds the loosened swingarm back and out of the way for gearbox removal.

    Agreed, sometimes is seems that these repair manual writers may not have ever worked on the vehicle described. :huh

    --Bill
    #26
  7. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer

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    Oooh. I like that idea. I'm going to make one of those. :evil
    #27
  8. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    In some of the manuals they say they do...but only once, and not necessarily looking for the easy way.

    With a rear drum brake, mark the brake rod and disconnect at the rear nut. With a rear disk, loosen the clamp on the reservoir a lot so it can pivot if you push the swingarm too far. I think the pedal can swing upwards to give an inch or two. Not sure. You have the mufflers off so the MC should be loose.
    #28
  9. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    I've got a rear main job upcoming and I'll snag a photo of the wooden block for the unitiated. If you've ever had the gearbox out, you'll know exactly what is should look like. If you've never had it out, it'll be mysterious.

    --Bill
    #29
  10. DOGBRETH

    DOGBRETH Adventurer

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    I have not read the whole thread in depth. I have done this job only on a R100R.

    With the above in mind, I can tell you that I used the "pull-the-engine-forward" method twice - nightmare.

    On the advice of Anton, I left the engine in place and the job was much easier.
    #30
  11. chasbmw

    chasbmw Long timer

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    Mind you, removing the front engine stud and greasing it so it does not carrode into the block should be on everyone's 5 year service list! Especially if you live in a wet climate.
    #31
  12. Rob Farmer

    Rob Farmer Long timer

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    Is that Jim?
    #32
  13. brocktoon

    brocktoon Been here awhile

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    So now that I've dealt with my wiring harness meltdown, I'm finally getting around to pulling the gearbox and trying a light coat of sealant on the gasket to prevent further leaking.

    I got the swingarm removed, airbox off, battery holders off (this is a /5) and am pulling the swingarm back but can't seem to get the clearance needed. Is there something else I should be removing? Shocks? Clutch arm?

    If any NorCal airheads around Santa Rosa see this, beers on me if you show me how to do it.
    #33
  14. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    ????

    The swingarm is removed? Then the shocks are removed too.

    I usually pull the swing arm pivots and the 4 subframe bolts, wheel on. Then move the the entire swingarm+tranny+subframe et. al back. That's for spline lube.. Unbolt tranny at swing arm to take it out.

    Remove Neutral switch wire from switch.

    Yes, remove clutch lever. You don't wanna bang it. When handling tranny, watch out for the clutch cable eye. Easy to bang that and break it.
    #34
  15. Kai Ju

    Kai Ju Long timer

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    I've never pulled the subframe since I need the rear fender to loop the tie strap around that holds the wheel/swingarm back to give me clearance to pull the transmission. I do like the 2x2 approach as well, may have to try that next time, thanks for the tip. Would love to see a pic of that. I can mock mine up to show the strap method in return.
    #35
  16. batoutoflahonda

    batoutoflahonda Long timer

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    When putting the swing arm on/off, I set a cinder block on end to support the final drive (G/S). The cut out on the block holds the drive very well, and lines the shaft up perfectly. Helps free up your hands & the screws go almost all the way in by hand. Also, a cotter pin puller helps to get the boot back on. The bend in those things is the trick.
    #36
  17. RayB

    RayB Been here awhile

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    Before you get too involved, make sure the shifter seal isn't leaking. Oil can migrate back to the spot you indicated. Simple checks first.
    #37
  18. Cogswell

    Cogswell Spudly Adventurer

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    Check the neutral switch too.


    Mike
    #38
  19. brocktoon

    brocktoon Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the recommendations regarding other places to check for the leak. I had already done the foot powder test to check for the leak source. It was coming from the bottom where the cover meets the case.

    I got the transmission out, cleaned the mating surfaces and the output shaft thoroughly with solvent (although the output shaft nut was torqued to spec, the output shaft flange required alarmingly little effort to remove).

    I applied a thin coat of threebond 1184 to the gasket, re-heated the cover and dropped it on evenly. So far no leaks, but I gotta take it on a long ride to make sure. The good news is that last time I put it together it was leaking before I ever started it up, so I've at least slowed down the leak, if not stopped it completely.
    #39