1. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
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    2,000
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    Oakland, CA
    How DID I KNOW that you live in CA. I like most of my neighbors, but one of the crunchy hippies up the street reported her neighbor for painting his house. She was ranting about lead abatement requirements.
    #41
  2. theGrinch

    theGrinch SNF Dream Riders

    Joined:
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    She probably chewed to much on her lead based painted baby crib wile in diapers and doesn't want anyone ending up like her.

    :freaky

    .
    #42
  3. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,000
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    I do have a question about the acid wash -- does the acid vapor cause rust problems?

    My garage is adjacent to my shop, I have a number of precision machine tools which I'd be upset if they rusted. I expect this might be an issue if you do half your garage at a time, too.

    Anyone have problems with this?
    #43
  4. Kali Trailrider

    Kali Trailrider PLATED X2

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    484
    Location:
    Murrieta, CA
    I personally dont think the half and half approach is worth the effort. It seems like you would waste some expensive material unless you mixed the perfect amount each time. Wait for good weather and maybe push everything into your back yard. Trying to etch one side of the garage and epoxy and then do the other side??

    I think you guys are making this a lot harder then it is.

    Anyone who is planning to use muriatic acid/hydrochoric acid (mixed with water in solution of course) to etch concrete or to remove grease/oil should also neutralize it before washing is down the drive or street.

    Just use some baking soda sprinkle it over the wet surface after scrubbing the acid bath solution in and you are satisfied with the results. Scrub the baking soda in a little. You can check the PH after with ph strips from any pool suppy place. Ph of 7 is neutal and that is what you want before you wash it down the street. Otherwise you will etch everything down the driveway to the crub and beyond. :lol3

    Will it rust no... Water is what causes rust so if it is fully dry you shouldn't have a problem with rust. unless the there is a lot of moisture in your area (maybe close to the beach???)

    Dudes??? there is so much stuff about this subject on the internet. Get the facts!! :deal

    How do you know I know what I am talking about??? :lol3
    #44
  5. Supahflid

    Supahflid Wheelieless

    Joined:
    May 29, 2008
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    3,906
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    Here for reals.
    I would like to pass on a couple of ideas about the topic at hand.

    First, with all coating be it paint over wood, urethane or epoxy on concrete floors or even mortar for tile laying, the substrate preparation is the key to a successful installation.

    The preparation for concrete for epoxy should include the following:

    1) A clean concrete floor.

    Muriatic, or any acid for that matter, does not remove oil and grease. You should seek a product made specifically for degreasing. Follow the instructions and remove all traces of the degreaser and lifted oil or grease when finished.

    2) A method to create surface profile.

    Muriatic, or hydrochloric, acid will create surface profile, however, if not strongly diluted, the fumes may cause surface rust to appear on any ferrous metals. Further, if the applicator doesn't have appropriate respiratory protection, it could be harmful to the applicators respiratory system.

    If you are going to use muriatic acid, you must also neutralize the acid with a base like baking soda. I would think that in California there are some fairly stringent rules about muriatic acid run off. I would strongly suggest that you don't use muriatic.

    A better method to create surface profile would be to shot blast the concrete. I would imagine you could find a contractor in your area that would shotblast the concrete for you. Either way, with muriatic or shotblasting, you are generally looking for an 80ish grit sandpaper feel to the concrete.

    Oh, and even though the shotblaster will vacuum the concrete as it blasts, you will still need to rinse the floor of dust.

    3) Properly cured concrete.

    Properly cured concrete generally reaches 97% of it's compressive strength in seven days. Most commercial floor coating manufacturer's would likely say the barest minimum cure time for the concrete prior to the application of coating would be 28 days, but I like the idea of giving the concrete plenty of time to cure.

    4) A dry substrate. Maybe.

    Most one hundred percent solids epoxies are moisture insensitive and can be applied to damp concrete. As a flooring contractor, I don't usually like to apply any coating over damp substrates, but sometimes, there is that need. Of course, whatever product you choose to use would drive what condition the concrete needs to be in. I would choose dry over damp.

    5) A properly functioning vapor barrier.

    If you have no vapor barrier under your concrete, you run the risk of moisture drive to the back of the applied epoxy and the resultant de-lamination. If you don't have a vapor barrier under the concrete or you don't know, there are products that can be applied to the top of the concrete prior to the application of epoxy that will block any moisture to the back of the coating.

    Good luck.
    #45