Even when you do it all wrong...

Discussion in 'Trials' started by motojunky, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    I'm a few events into my third year of competing on my trials bike. One thing that I've learned is that if I'm patient and don't dab immediately I can get away with some pretty big mistakes. The video below is a good example. I blew the approach and completely missed the log with the front wheel. That meant no compression and no lift. The log is elevated enough that I didn't expect to make it after screwing up so badly. I resisted the urge to stop on top and waited to see what would happen. It was ugly, but over is over... I did get it right on another attempt, but of course, there's no video of that. :lol3

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/JyyXH2US0FA" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>

    I share this embarrassing moment with you all to pass on that little pearl of wisdom. Resist the dab until you're sure you need it. Easier said than done!
    #1
  2. GrayEagleRider

    GrayEagleRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    237
    Location:
    Fayetteville, NC
    I can vouch for MJ, I was the cameraman. The attempt just before this one was clean with only some minor tire spin due to dried bark on log. Something about the camera make my brain cramp too.:D

    Good advice. I think I am too quick to dab... except for that early log crossing when I dabbed with my left butt cheek.:lol3 I'm just glad that most of my crossings were "over." And like you said, over is over!
    #2
  3. Choicecut

    Choicecut Lean, Tender and Juicy.

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    289
    Location:
    Zanesville, Ohio
    Ugly? Looked pretty good to me..you guys make it look effortless!
    #3
  4. Sting32

    Sting32 Trials Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,497
    Location:
    Minneapolis, Ks
    Do you happen to recall how many times it has been said (by me at least), to find a trials riding buddy that knows how to ride? :y0!

    Well, the reason for the S-A question is, not long ago this was how we got over logs, especially without the monoshock bikes. Yet, now-days, it is STILL one way of getting over a (bigger) log, just about like you do it in the video. In fact, some logs I prefer to go slightly slower, to get the bike just on the log, just enough to then "rock" forward, and on over the the log, compared to how you kept it all one motion. Sure, it is NOT "No-Stop" approved, but it lets you come off the log and turn quickly, or what have you.

    What I see, from an instructional point of view, you are in 3rd year? you should never give yourself more than 2 bike lengths "approach" anymore then you should force a sharp turn aftewards, within a bike & a half... When you practice, you practice "up" as in harder than your class. Because, in a trials I will never ever give you more than 2 bike lengths, except for maybe a hillclimb start, where you make your own approach.

    Did you see my video of my teenager that bought his 1st bike in late october of 2012, He'd been riding qwads mainly, so it was basically his first motorcycle.

    This is kind of what I mean by practicing "up"...
    here is the video (might be a link to several videos on youtube under my nickname). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hhQScyvGBY&list=PLFF475E280726B996
    #4
  5. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    So you're saying I shouldn't ride when I don't have a better riding buddy available? If that's the case, I'd ride about 3 times per year. There are very few folks nearby who ride trials.

    Nope, first gear, and my bike has lower than stock gearing. Yeah, I know you practice up and all that... I was goofing off... having fun. I'm very aware that I'm never going to be an amazing rider. Sometimes I ride just to have fun. No, scratch that... I ALWAYS ride to have fun. Sometimes I practice with focus and sometimes I goof off.

    Jeebus. I knew I shouldn't have posted anything. I was goofing off and made a stupid mistake that got captured on video. I thought it was worthwhile to point out that even when you do it wrong you can get away with it much of the time. I did NOT post it as any sort of demonstration about how to do something correctly.
    #5
  6. Sting32

    Sting32 Trials Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,497
    Location:
    Minneapolis, Ks

    Sorry, I was being constructive, I didn't realize I would piss you off.

    I said 3rd year? not gear. I semi challenged you to challenge yourself, and I tried to make lite of the whole thing, by even saying it was a Smart Ass (SA) comment by me... Jebus.

    BTW, I have heard lots of people saying 'just having fun' never be a 'stud' but they start practicing and suddenly it renews themselves into that guy that just suddenly gets better.

    No,about the comment of dont ride if you dont have a trials buddy... are you so sensitive all the time? I was just being a little silly with my post. Pointing out that you had used on of the many 'tactics' we've learned to get over a log, good job and I really like the video, and your learning a lot IMHO, I just didn't go on and on about that "congrats" part, sorry.

    I am sorry for any strife I caused you this morning.
    #6
  7. laser17

    laser17 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    957
    Location:
    Boston,Massachusetts
    MJ - I dont think Sting was trying to send a negative message, but it obviously was interpreted that way. I think he goes into teacher mode automatically and over stepped abit. I would agree with everything you both said, just on different pages.:1drink

    To your original point, I give up WAY too many dabs that aren't needed. Its usually related to my confidence factor (lack of) and I give up nervous and stupid points. Conversely, I ride with a guy who is a decent rider and a GREAT recovery artist. Everytime I watch him ride a tough section for the 1st time, I end up laughing cause its just amazing what he will pull off. He seems to get away with it - when I do that, I usually end up in a yard sale...:eek1 He always reminds me of the saying "desperate men do desperate things" - I swear he rides some of the hardest lines and just keeps going. He just refuses to give into the dab and the heck with the consequences. :clap
    #7
  8. Sting32

    Sting32 Trials Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,497
    Location:
    Minneapolis, Ks

    Laser, we have a guy in our club, like you mention that can have the uncanny "recovery" luck, he's in Sr Amature, & I get the giggles so hard watching him ride the sections I judge, that I cannot video him, i have even tried.
    #8
  9. ridenm

    ridenm Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,857
    Location:
    Carnuel, NM USA
    One of the many things I have inmate A-team to thank for is helping me to learn patience in the section. I can remember specifically a section at Angel Fire a few years ago where I wound up stopped off-line with my front tire on top of a cut sapling stump. Tony exhorted me to calm down and just ride the damn thing. The bikes are capable of so much more than any novice or amateur really realizes at first.
    #9
  10. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    I was chuckling a little while replying, but I did read your post the wrong way. Stress level high... thought level low...

    A couple of years ago I took a lot of crap for not wanting to compete and just wanting to play ride. I guess had a little flashback. :lol3

    My apologies!
    #10
  11. laser17

    laser17 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    957
    Location:
    Boston,Massachusetts
    so does this mean we'll see more video's? If you do, for god sakes put in some turns...Kidding MJ...:D

    ALWAYS Have fun out there - none of us are Pro's and probably never will be, but I know I have alot of fun and have made some very good friends making an ass out of myself on a trials bike. :1drink
    #11
  12. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    Just for you... you've seen bad log crossings... now get ready for bad turning. :D I took this over the winter on a greasy, leaf & root covered hillside in my yard.

    I originally bought the trials bike to ride in my yard, 'cause I was tired of driving several hours to ride my dirt bike. After a lot of peer pressure (abuse?) here, I finally went to an event to check it out. I had a great time and met some great people. Now I drive several hours every few weeks to events. So much for not driving to ride. :huh I also ride ~ once a week at home. I went from riding my dirt bike 4-5 times a year to riding my trials bike 4-5 times per month. Good stuff!

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/EkJzkdYbSp8" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>
    #12
  13. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,673


    See if you can get hold of the instructional book by Bernie Schrieber and Len Weed..........."Observed Trials". It dates back to the 1980s, but explains very clearly the basic techniques you will need to master before going on to the very much more advanced stuff you are likely to see in present day videos and DVD's.

    Once you have got the basics everything else will follow on much more easily. Something thats worth while doing to improve your bike at very little cost, and will help your riding, is to fit a fast action throttle (white throttle tube) if you dont have one already.
    #13
  14. Sting32

    Sting32 Trials Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,497
    Location:
    Minneapolis, Ks
    Sadly, on that log crossing, 'that is a clean' so you can't call it a BAD log crossing. :*sip* although your "competitors" will groan sometimes, if that happens in a section where they put his/her foot down at same spot.

    in fact, the more 'little mistakes' you have like that, are {self taught, or instructor led} lessons you got to have at least taken the exams on :thumb

    Now get out there and have fun. :wink:
    #14
  15. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    I have the book and have read it several times. I have a pretty solid understanding (IMO) of what I should be doing. It's that whole "actually doing it" thing that's tricky. :rofl

    But anyway, the original point of the thread was to remind folks to be patient and ride it out when you screw up. You might be surprised to find that you can still get through without taking points.
    #15
  16. laser17

    laser17 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    957
    Location:
    Boston,Massachusetts
    Thanks MJ - Im honored. looks like a good practice spot.
    #16
  17. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,673
    If you have read the book, then try and practice the basic techniques repeatedly till you ride that way without thinking. A very good exercise for beginners is full lock turns, going to the other lock after going 360 degrees. Try this first on level flat ground, then introduce some slopes or easy obstacles.

    That will help a lot with turning obviously, but also throttle and clutch control. At first it will seem a bit difficult, but after a while it will be much easier, and thats the time to introduce some slopes or obstacles.
    #17
  18. motojunky

    motojunky Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    North East, MD
    This seems contradictory to your usual advice that a smaller bike is better for beginners. It seems to me that softening the hit for newer riders would make sense. Please explain why a fast throttle tube would be a benefit to a new rider. :ear
    #18
  19. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,673
    Trials is all about reaction.............the slow action throttle slows down the time it takes for the rear wheel to react to movement of the throttle grip. Fast throttles are very cheap, and I would suggest if you have a slow one (black throttle tube), to get a fast one and see what you think.
    #19
  20. laser17

    laser17 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    957
    Location:
    Boston,Massachusetts
    I think the try and see part of that advice is the best part. Conversely, I have put on several slow throttles for novice riders to see them ride in a more controllable manner vs the everything is happening too fast syndrome they were in prior to its' install. IMO: Trials at the novice level is about learning to keep up with the bike reactions. The day your waiting for the bike to keep up with you - then go ahead and put the fast one back on. (Virtually all modern bikes come with a fast tube (white) as OEM)

    Never-the-less, try it and see is always good advice.
    #20