expensive textile suit and crash

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by bikefever, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. bikefever

    bikefever Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Oddometer:
    15
    Location:
    Poland
    Random thought Guys...

    As Im on the market for new textile suit I do a lot of reading. Dont mind spending extra money on something high end like Rukka, Stadler, Klim but the only thing that still holds me off is the fact if I go down all big money will land in the bin!
    Im aware of all the added safety, comfort and how much more technical these expensive brands are but it can be written off so easily and if so Im gonna need to fork out series lump from my wallet again. Hence, I dont mind spending on quality product especially when getting 5-10 years warranty very often and knowing that such garment outlasts 3 regular ones, but what if I crash?
    Did you have same doubts when buying your suits or maybe I understand something wrong...?

    (Sorry for mystakes, English is my second language)
    #1
  2. keiji

    keiji Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,152
    No, that's pretty much how it is with most high end textiles. you kind of just deal with it, or move to leather. Some companies will offer repair services, but the cost can be just as much as a more moderately priced garment.

    Few riders will say "I wish I spent less on my protective equipment!" After a crash!
    #2
  3. Walterxr650l

    Walterxr650l Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,323
    Location:
    Donald, Oregon
    Simple solution is don't crash.:rofl

    Which is cheaper a $1,000 suit or a $10,000 medical bill. You can get a cheaper suit, but do you trust it in a crash. My $500 suit has had two seams fail and it has never been in a crash. Make me wonder how it would hold up when it counted, and wish I had spent the extra dollors for a more expensive suit. Aerostich will repair a crashed suit (if it is repairable). You might want to research whether the brand you choose will offer the same service.

    Walter
    #3
  4. Jnich77

    Jnich77 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    844
    Location:
    Orlando Fl
    My 280.00 Joe rocket is about 6 years old, had one wreck, brushed it off and still ride with it.
    #4
  5. Mr_Gone

    Mr_Gone The Lejund!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    8,695
    Location:
    Mountain Home, AR
    Depending on your insurance, your insurance company should reimburse you for items damaged in a crash. This includes gloves, jackets, and helmets. All insurance companies are different, though... best to check with yours.

    When I had a slow-speed get-off, State Farm replaced my gloves and helmet. My jacket wasn't damaged, nor were my boots. My gloves were shredded and my helmet had a couple big dents.

    Sometimes these damaged items are covered under your auto policy; sometimes they are covered under your homeowner's/renter's policy. Again, it's best to check with your agent. Some insurance companies might not cover these items at all.

    I've been with the same State Farm office for 30 years. They know me. I visit them regularly to make sure they have the correct information. This is called "being on good terms with your insurance agent" and it will play off eventually. When it came to my crash, they filed a claim but just wrote me a check there in the office for the gloves and helmet. An adjuster came out to look at the bike in the repair shop, but he wrote me a check same day.

    If you really do drop a lot of money on gear — gloves, helmet, jacket, pants, boots — your insurance company can probably also write a "personal articles" policy to cover these items specifically.
    #5
  6. bob393

    bob393 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    394
    Location:
    Goshen, NY
    I went with a Stitch two piece suite and love it.

    I've only been down a couple of times off road and no damage yet, just dirt.
    I absolutely agree that no one complains about the price of safety equipment after a crash especially if it saves your ass.
    #6
  7. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15,059
    Location:
    Chicago-ish
    ]I do not think that leather gear is much more repairable than high end textile gear . . . . .although leather IS more abrasion resistant, and would be less likely to need repair, I beleive the differences are small . . . . . .

    Small enough to ignore? That is a very individual decision . . . . I really wear my leathers any more, as the convenience of my two-piece Roadcrafter makes it the gear I reach for most every time.

    Your English is fine!
    #7
  8. Mr_Gone

    Mr_Gone The Lejund!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    8,695
    Location:
    Mountain Home, AR
    Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention: you're English is pretty good. You've got no worries.
    #8
  9. NesquikNinja

    NesquikNinja Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    346
    Location:
    East Missouri
    First off, I am always impressed when people learn english as a second language, and you are doing just fine.

    Second- yes, it sucks replacing crashed gear. Your options are buy cheap gear and sacrifice protection, or buy leather. I would always wear leather because I do not see it as inconvenient myself, but offroad its the farthest thing from ideal, so I wear Motoport.

    Personally, I cannot afford motoport. I bought mine used, its too small, and sometimes get uncomfortable. But, all the pads stay in place exactly how they should, so it "fits" as far as protection is concerned. If I wreck it- I hope I dont- and it becomes unwearable, I will probably spend another few hundred bucks on a high end used suit.
    #9
  10. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,443
    Location:
    Earth
    I didn't know that insurance would cover jackets, etc. I know Progressive covered my helmet twice. They also covered my $3000 in accessories once I provided a list.

    I suppose as the price of good gear escalates, we can expect that a rider could be attached to a policy to cover the jacket, for a fee of course. Considering a Rukka or equivalent suit can cost upwards of $2,000 this is not so farfetched.....

    Bottom line though is, get the best gear you can swing, it will pay you back in agony and $$$ in the event of a crash. That said it has yet to be proven (?) that the high ticket gear protects you any better than any lower priced that meets government standards, such as they are.
    #10
  11. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

    Joined:
    May 18, 2002
    Oddometer:
    22,807
    Location:
    The Submarine Mines
    When I was hit by a truck several years ago, the other insurance company covered the cost of my 'stitch, which was undamaged despite my ragdolling 60' down the road. The suit was damaged when a sleeve was cut open to the shoulder for the EMTs to get an IV started. They also covered a replacement helmet and the GPS I had on the bike.

    I limped away mostly okay, my right groin muscle was partially torn off my pelvis when I was ejected off the bike. No bones broken, no road rash and nearly no bruising.
    #11
  12. Noth

    Noth Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    132
    Location:
    Massachusetts..
    The other insurance co would have to pay for any property damaged as a result of their drivers negligence anyway... I wonder if protective clothing falls into the definition of the vehicle and it's equipment.. for instannce in a one vehicle accident.. I'm going to check on that.. and that may vary State to State as they all have a different standard policy form
    #12
  13. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,189
    Location:
    Detroit mostly
    You're paying for creature comforts up in the Rukka range. TBH, how much do you want to enjoy your ride? Waterproofing the way you like it and suitable vents are worth spending on for sure. IMO, the safety is largely even in the middle tier of gear, so get what you want.

    Motorrad (the magazine) did a big textile review some years ago, and for protection, there was a sharp cutoff around 250€ for the whole suit - above that, everything was rather equal. Below it, not going there. They concluded that you pay for goodies, but protection is protection, and if it meets the standard, it meets the standard.

    There seems to be a lot less variance in the protective attributes of textile gear than helmets.
    #13
  14. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,443
    Location:
    Earth
    I agree with this. Regarding creature (me) comforts: Got the Rukka gear last year, and having the waterproofing on the outside, so it doesn't get soaked and I don't need liners, is great. The fit and finish is significantly better than the RP2 it replaced.
    #14
  15. Law Dawg (ret)

    Law Dawg (ret) Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    Oddometer:
    820
    Location:
    Left Coast
    Motoport and it's custom made for your size.
    #15
  16. mrt10x

    mrt10x Dumba$s Jarhead

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,217
    Location:
    Woodland Park, CO
    When I crashed my Geico insurance replaced my motorcycle specific gear. Well they offered to, I just didnt take them up on it, the Aerostich Darien didnt really need to be replaced. They did replace my helmet.
    #16
  17. K0m4

    K0m4 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    South Caucasus
    In my crash (http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19013843&postcount=517), the insurance company would have replaced the gear - I have full coverage though so even that it was my fault they would have paid for it. I never made a claim though, I decided it was better not to. That's an 80 km/h crash, so the stuff held up great. Had to just buy a new shell jacket, but used the fabric of the old one to fix the pant leg. Sure glad I spent the money on it! Nothing like walking from the scene rather than being carried...
    #17
  18. StuartV

    StuartV Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,569
    Location:
    Manassas, VA
    State Farm in Florida replaced my helmet and GPS, but did nothing for my Roadcrafter, boots, or gloves.

    My Roadcrafter cost around $175 to repair. They had to replace a whole sleeve, plus the left side butt cheek panel and a couple of other smaller things. That was after a low side doing about 55MPH, where I slid off the road pretty quickly and into a ditch. I was completely unhurt (other than some dislocated ribs that had to be popped back in by my chiro when I got home a few days later - slide into a mailbox post, back first, and these things will happen).

    But, after having that suit for a few years, I got a Motoport mesh Kevlar 2pc (had it for about 4 years now, I think) and now I almost never wear the Roadcrafter. The MP suit fits better, is more comfortable (even when it's cold and wet out), and, I believe, will protect me better AND hold up better in a crash.
    #18
  19. bikefever

    bikefever Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Oddometer:
    15
    Location:
    Poland
    Thanks for expressing all the opinions Guys, very helpful!
    Never knew insurer can cover garments and helmets (just started my very second bike season now) will have to make some enqueries.
    Again, thanks a lot :clap
    #19