Experience with AdvDesigns FuzeBlock

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by GrimerX, Oct 1, 2012.

  1. aGremlin

    aGremlin Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    738
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    New Zealand!
    I have about 4 leads to each terminal. 1 set is OEM, 2x for accessory hubs and 1x for some direct wire.

    Between two accessory hubs I'm powering about 8-10 devices... I don't think the screws would go into the battery if I tried to put all the leads direct to the battery, not to mention the mess.
    #21
  2. TuefelHunden

    TuefelHunden Been here awhile

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    +1, When you have leads running all over your battery not only are wires a mess but so are the fuse containers.
    #22
  3. hardpackrider

    hardpackrider Been here awhile

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    jThomas82,

    that is a thing of beauty.. I bought the fuzeblock, but what you've done with the wiring, etc.. is pro. Trying to sort that out.. Where did u get your wire braided "sleeve" material? ..

    really nice install.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #23
  4. Pete O Static

    Pete O Static Adventure Seeker

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    The instructions that come with the FZ1 are pretty clear about not having more than 10 amps per circuit and 30amps in total. His reasoning is that in order to keep the unit as small as possible, the wire within the circuit board can only handle 10 amps.

    For heated gear, you are going to be very close, if not over that limit and if you add gloves to the jacket, you will be over for sure. As someone previously suggested, if you are going to run heated gear, wire two circuits in parallel using say, two 7.5 amp fuses for a total of 15 amps for your gear. I have seen some installs sporting 20 amp fuses on one circuit to run heated gear but that is just asking for trouble in my opinion because the FZ1 will possibly ignite before that fuse will open the circuit. He does warn of this in the directions. As he also repeatedly states, fuses are to protect your bike, not the electronic gizmo on the circuit.

    I have an Eastern Beaver PC8 if you are looking for one. The reason I swapped out to the FZ1 is because the relay is on the circuit board making a cleaner install, where as the PC-8 relay is a separate unit with means more wires.

    I installed the FZ1 under the seat in the tool tray. All wires run underneath. Tapped into the socket wiring harness for Canbus trigger and wired the socket to the FZ1 to bypass Canbus on that circuit. Lets face it, the socket as it is, wired to Canbus, is virtually useless.

    You will be pleased with the unit for sure.
    #24
  5. SiouxsieCat

    SiouxsieCat Been here awhile

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    Mar 22, 2010
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    In the top image, it appears there is a line going up front with an in-line fuse coming out of the fuzeblock.
    I'm not an electrician, but that is redundant and not really needed, right?

    Cheers
    #25
  6. paulhdick

    paulhdick Wannabe Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    356
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    I have been very happy with my FuzeBlock since I installed it about a year ago. Although maybe a bit overboard, I connectorized the battery power and trigger in wires as well as the feed wires. These connectors are made by Deutsch and are completely waterproof!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    This is what the entire assembly looks like which I mounted into the top tool tray.<o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]<o:p></o:p>

    For the trigger wire I bought the BMW OEM Aux outlet kit and installed the socket in the fairing per instructions and location, but wired it in differently. This kit comes with a connectorized cable that runs from the aux socket and “Y’s” in to the existing socket under the seat. Instead of doing that I cut the cable in half and installed the powerlet end as normal.<o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]<o:p></o:p>

    I then connected the other ”Y” end as normal by disconnecting the underseat socket, installed the new “Y” socket in its place, then connect the male end you removed into the female connector. The other end of the wire I connected to the FuzeBlock trigger circuit. Simple and completely reversible without cutting or splicing any original wiring. Here is the “Y” cable in place. Note the spare fuses!!<o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]<o:p></o:p>

    And the entire assembly connected. <o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]<o:p></o:p>
    I power up my tankbag with an SAE connector (ignition trigger), and the front Aux socket (always on) with the other, which I use for an extra GPS, Heated gear, etc .,or my Battery Tender for charging.<o:p></o:p>
    #26
  7. WindSailor

    WindSailor Been here awhile

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    I don't know where he got it but here are some links to other braided sleeve sites (I didn't buy the 'clean cut' version and 'my sleeving' tended to fray really quick when handling it or moving it around when installing it [terminated it by using silicone tape] - some are sold by the foot - others by the roll).

    Electriduct.com - Braided Sleeving

    Waytekwire.com - Braided Sleeving

    Cabletiesandmore.com - Braided Sleeving
    #27
  8. WindSailor

    WindSailor Been here awhile

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    [QUOTE='05Train] It [distribution block] just seems like you're adding another failure point.[/QUOTE]

    On that point I agree whole heartily... I want DEPENDABLE.

    Mine is the standard automotive 'bus bar' type fuse block with fuses - no electronics to fail - just fuses. Suits me just fine.:D

    -Edit-
    I'm not going to -diss- this because it works as expected - I just went another route. But still listening...
    #28
  9. GrimerX

    GrimerX Adventurer

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    Sep 18, 2012
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    Seattle, WA
    [​IMG]

    I ended up with the PC-8. 3 powerlets and a stebel horn. The wiring at the box could have been neater but what I really wanted to get right were the wire runs up to the front. I found some cheap shrink-wrap at Lowes or HD (8' 1/2"->1/4" for a few bucks) and wrapped the whole length. The stuff is pretty tough so if it does rub anywhere it'll take a bit just to get through that.

    If I end up with some spare time over the winter I might run the wires up through the bottom of the tray or use a connector like some of you have done. That really puts the icing on the cake for a neat install :-)
    #29
  10. viz

    viz I Ride Ms Piggy

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Sydney, Oz
    My setup

    Fuzeblock and Relay

    I use the relay for the aux lights (6 x LED units) as the combined total would have exceeded the Fuzeblock's amperage of 30 amps. Note relay is of the diode protected variety - check out the part number.

    Also: Trigger Wire attachment

    viz
    #30
  11. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    That is correct. The lower value fuse will fail first, the higher value fuse doesn't *do* anything. Setting up two fuses in series doesn't offer any more protection than a single fuse.

    Using two fuses in parallel allows you to pull more current, much in the same way twinning a water line will give you more output at the end of the pipe. IMO, if you've got an accessory pulling 30A (two 15A fuses), and it isn't a clothes dryer or electric stove, you're doing something wrong.
    #31
  12. AntonLargiader

    AntonLargiader Long timer

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    There's a lot of misunderstanding about what fuses do. The individual fuses protect the individual circuits, but they do not protect the upstream wiring in the event of damage to the fuzeblock itself or to the supply wire.

    A fuse on the power supply lead protects the power supply lead and to some extent the upstream components (just the battery in this case) in the event of a short. So if the seat pinched the supply wire against the shock mount bolt and caused a short, the fuse would go first. Notice how the fuse is very close to the battery? That's well done; there is very little unprotected wiring in this installation.
    #32