Exploring Alabama’s long lost cemeteries.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by DeBandi, May 8, 2010.

  1. arkansawyer

    arkansawyer Long timer

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    I hope you let someone at the courthouse know where these are. Probably varies by state, but the presence of a cemetary affects buying and selling land.
    Dad and I found an old family cemetary a long time ago. I was on an XR75 if that tells you anything. The graves were mostly from 1840 or so. That land changed hands 10 years ago and nobody knew about it. Dad just happened to hear the right person talking about the land selling and brought it up. It's much easier to get to now. A big middle finger to whoever stole the iron fence around it.
    I like to stop and take breaks at these places, especially the old ones.
    #61
  2. rescueMAN

    rescueMAN Been here awhile

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    come on, we're all awaiting another instalment,,,,, :deal
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  3. PinkPillion

    PinkPillion Been here awhile

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    DITTO.
    #63
  4. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    I :ear hear you loud and clear.


    I'll be exploring another old cemetery this coming weekend.

    Stay tuned.



    Thanks all....
    :pynd
    #64
  5. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    David, I have fallen behind on your ride reports! Didn't know you had started this one, too.

    Not to take over your report... more like to add to it... Some time when you are a little east I will tell you about Doc Holliday's mum's grave in Valdosta, GA...
    [​IMG]


    And the first Catholic cemetary in the state (here's a hint... it's not in Savannah like a lot of folks believe)
    [​IMG]
    #65
  6. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    This lost cemetery dates from 1865.



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    Most of the names have long been washed away with time.




    Only a few markers are still legible.





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    Next to the grave of John & Nancy Thompson's infant son, I discover



    [​IMG]



    Samuel Rogers.





    His wife, Delila, rests peacefully next to him.


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    I also find a couple of stacked stone graves.


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    The names have long been lost.




    [​IMG]
    #66
  7. LewisNClark

    LewisNClark Long timer

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    If you can access a local public library that has copies of the census journals (they're normally on microfis) you can get a wealth of info about misspellings of last names and quick family trees. Can't remember when the census started,

    Most or your and my ancestors earlier than 1860/1870's had very limited literacy. Many also changed the spelling of names but made no legal record of it at their court house.

    Also you will probably be surprised when doing a google search for "name grave Alabama", etc. Many 1800 cemetery's inventory can be found on google. Not sure yet but the cemetery above may have been a black cemetery, lots of the really remote cemeteries were for poor blacks.

    LnC
    Below is a link to a list of cemeteries in AL and last names of inventory by last names in a PDF file. Spelling is normally more accurate since it often originated from census records.

    http://alabamamaps.ua.edu/cartlab/publications/historic2.pdf
    #67
  8. exoff-roadgoat

    exoff-roadgoat Will ride for food

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    Excellent thread De. My wife's family is from Allybama, Myrtlewood to be exact. Great subject, great pics and sweet bike. Keep it coming.
    #68
  9. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    Your photography skills get better every time. :thumb
    #69
  10. mike

    mike Long timer

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    Fascinating. Thanks for the pictures and stories.
    #70
  11. PinkPillion

    PinkPillion Been here awhile

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    Super set of photos. Delila's broken headstone has a nice effect--goes along with the calmness of an old cemetery.
    #71
  12. Brown Dog

    Brown Dog North Georgia Dual Sportr

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    Fine Job Dave.
    Did you get your Bro's permission to ride his Husky :ricky
    #72
  13. jeep8

    jeep8 Been here awhile

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    :ear
    #73
  14. viperh

    viperh StormChaser

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    awesome.. Subscribing!
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  15. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    Thanks LnC...:thumb
    #75
  16. AlabamaCowboy

    AlabamaCowboy Been here awhile

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    David-

    Interesting report and I enjoyed the photos.... The stacked stone graves are fairly common in small, rural cemeteries up here in the Northeastern Madison County.... In college, I did a semester of directed studies on Southern Burial Customs and Cemeteries and found it to be a fascinating subject...... I once new more about the stacked stone graves, but have long since forgotten I am afraid....

    I recall that customs and practices even in Alabama, vary widely from one region of the state to another.... Tennessee Valley had its own set of practices due to the preponderance of early settlers from the Carolinas, Virgina and Georgia....and being predominately Scots-Irish, Irish, English, etc... the wiregrass region down south had its own customs and practices that I recall being quite different from those up here in North Alabama...and of course Mobile with its French/Spanish influences is different still....

    Overall, fascinating stuff... and something most of us do not give much thought to..... the old/rural protestant cemeteries are being quickly replaced by the big football field expanses of manicured commercial cemeteries... and it is a shame ...

    Thanks for the report !! Keep up the amazing work... and by the way.... I mentioned to the owner of New Market BBQ, that your wife and she went to high school... she was utterly confused.. not understanding how someone here would have any connection to back home in Kentucky... but she put it together and we were both laughing about the "connections" we Southerners seem to have, no matter where we might move to !
    #76
  17. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    Thanks AlabamaCowboy!

    I too find the Burial Custom of stacked stone graves to be fascinating.


    -Some believe the field stones were placed on graves to deter scavenging animals.

    -Others believe it was to show respect.

    Very interesting.




    I have another lost cemetery to explore this weekend.
    #77
  18. SilentRay

    SilentRay Rebuilt

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    :super :thumb Ditto on the great pics. Very interesting reading also. Those that have gone before us are part of what we now are. Lets not forget em.

    Way to go. Keep em commin
    #78
  19. jonnyw

    jonnyw Been here awhile

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    I too love the history of this country. I was born and raised in N GA at the bottom of Kennesaw MTN. Grew up playing in the civil war trenches and fox holes as a kid litterally in our back yard. Lived in FLA for a few years and now live in SC. The history in Sc is amazing instead of seeing early to mid 1800s you see 1700 and even 1600 history markers. I may have a clue to the unusual tombs in some of your pics. Watched a recent show on TV about who really discovered America that was very interesting. They said that a Welsch group was believed to have went up Mobile bay and moved thru Al and N GA and later blened in with the natives to form the Mandan tribe in Ohio. This could have been some of thier decendents. The Desoto falls area have caves with remnants of unusual rock buildings/tombs that the locals have callled the Welsch caves for as long as any one can remember. A side note I am probally 1 of 2 people ever to scuba dive at Desoto Falls I talk my buddy into a adventure from hell many years ago. We dragged our 100 pound of gear over boulders for miles to get at the base of the falls. It kicked our ass but it was worth it- ADVSCUBA. Keep it coming
    #79
  20. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    Lost cemetery # 9


    I find myself in the middle of 5 1/2 acres of thick brush.



    [​IMG]



    The final resting place of some 300 people lies hidden all around me.
    #80