Extract broken bold - FAIL

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HenryFL, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. concours

    concours WFO for 44 years

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    I'm dead serious. Once you get it apart, you'll see I was correct. If you are skilled in the machinists disciplines, drilling and chasing the thread will work. Or ask a pro to do it.
    #21
  2. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    How "not surprised" am I that one could be welded in there.:D Tamper proof and non-serviceable.:D Doesn't that exhaust have a warning stamped right on it also....in compliance with the EPA regulations???:wink:

    Remember what I said up there on removing the temper by heating it up...some clues at the bottom of that page that it will also work on SS.Could make it a lot easier to drill.:eek1

    http://www.metalreference.com/INFO_Stainless_Steel.html
    #22
  3. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    Thank for all the help everyone. Have a dremel, rotozip, etc. I'll try those with a tungsten, then maybe a rasp, then carbide if needed. I have taps, chasers, thread repairers, etc which I'll try afterwards. If none of that works, I'll get my brother to tig something on there to grip. Not sure if he can mig but I know he can tig. if that fails, or if I destroy it, I'll grid the while thread tube off from the inside and weld a nut in there and screw into that. I'll try to post another photo to help future thread readers who may have broken screws. Thanks again.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
    #23
  4. nanotech9

    nanotech9 ** Slidewayz **

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    I haven't found any metal yet that the tungsten rounded end dremel bit won't cut through... You may go through two of them (and they're pricey) but you might get lucky using just one.

    The only thing more badass i've seen is a tool (machine) we have at work... it spits out a thin rod that you center up over broken bolts and taps and it literally burns the item out. I've never seen it work, but they say its really great.
    #24
  5. moymurfs

    moymurfs Play stupid games, win stupid prizes!

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    Ahh yes, the suzuki can tip..been there, done that...here's what I found out..... the other 2 screws hold it just fine :wink:
    #25
  6. dtysdalx2

    dtysdalx2 PITA but useful

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    My SV had 3 bolts on each can that had a spot weld on the edge of each screw. Grind down and turn all 3 screws out no problem!

    The new V strom has the end cap just welded on in 3 places. Looks like they are catchin' on to these mufflerectomies...:wink:
    #26
  7. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    Bought two expensive Dewalt specialty bits that state on the package, made for hardened steel, girders, and stainless. I may as well have used a gummy bear. They did nothing. Also disintegrated two dremel pointed grinder bits. I think I may glue the bolt head back on and live with the other two screws holding it, which they seem to do fine.
    #27
  8. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    If you need to drill hardened bolts, then a simple way to do it is to use masonry drills.
    #28
  9. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    tried 2, destroyed them.
    #29
  10. CycleDoc59

    CycleDoc59 Wrench Rider

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    I haven't tried them, but there are special bits made for locksmith use
    for that very purpose. http://www.wlfuller.com/html/drills_for_hardened_steel.html

    A couple days ago, I could have used one to drill out a stuck axle pinch bolt
    on a sport bike. It took an hour with the bits I had on hand, one of which was
    a masonry bit that actually worked well for about a minute.
    #30
  11. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    Well it's not just me, I've been at the custom exhaust fabricator and they have been drilling for an hour and gotten nowhere.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
    #31
  12. aardschok

    aardschok Fallout Rider

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    I'm surprised no one has said this yet. Just use left hand (counter clockwise) drill bits. Drill VERY slow speed. I NEVER drill a broken bolt without a left hand drill bit. (Unless it's a left hand thread bolt.)
    #32
  13. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    Took three hours. They broke at least 8 bits and an extractor. They ended up having to beat and cut the whole area out and mig a nut in there. It was a complete mess. It's put back together now but not the best looking job. My advice - if you break a bolt on your exhaust, try to drill it out but don't spend weeks and countless bits like I did and destroy all up. If it does not go well on the first couple of bits, grind around the whole problem (in the soft steel) and have someone weld in a nut for $20.

    Also be careful of the dealer - they wanted 2 hrs @ $95 each to fix it. For which I could almost have just bought a slip on.
    #33
  14. nanotech9

    nanotech9 ** Slidewayz **

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    Were they the tungsten bits i put in my picture, or something "similar"...?
    #34
  15. dtysdalx2

    dtysdalx2 PITA but useful

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    So what was the explanation? Was the bolt made of Tungsten? Weird.

    I have seen huge chunks of copper silver soldered together, we tried to separate the two blocks but it was impossible. Had to use a mill to see how they were fastened together. Had to take a huge amount of heat to solder 1" thick copper together.
    #35
  16. concours

    concours WFO for 44 years

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    No, they are stainless bolts, when someone unfamiliar with it's ability to work harden begins drilling, THAT causes the hardness. The proper way is, SHARP cobalt bit, turn it slow and feed it hard so it's cutting rather than slipping. I worked on food processing machinery for years (all stainless) and watched this very same debacle unfold time after time.
    #36
  17. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Very very easy to drill out hard bolts................simply use a cheap and easily available masonry drill.
    #37
  18. Flashmo

    Flashmo Whatever...

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    This is correct. There is no need for special bits on stainless, unless you screw it up in the beginning.

    Concours: Before I spent a stint working nuclear machinery (all stainless) I used to install food processing lines. From individual pieces of equipment to entire new multi line plants. It's amazing how easy stainless is to work once you "get it". And it's amazing just how screwed up an apprentice can make something when they don't "get it."
    #38
  19. concours

    concours WFO for 44 years

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    :nod ASME section III experience here as well. ...and Neo-Lube is your friend! http://www.newmantools.com/chemicals/neolube1pds.htm
    #39
  20. HenryFL

    HenryFL Old: Molly

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    Per several of my posts above, I destroyed at least 5 masonry, tile, glass, and spade bits on this screw.
    #40