F658GS Which first, Skid plate or Crash bars

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by twinjet, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    Budget constraints dictate doing one this year and to other next year. The question is which should one do first a skid plate or crash bars?
    #1
  2. rdtele

    rdtele Adventurer

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    I spent a couple hours sampling a tamer portion of the TAT yesterday. My vote is for crash bars.

    Had a stupid 'wrong foot, wrong place, wrong time' zero mph topple over at the top of a steep hill. Crash bars did their job and spared I guess what could have been a lot of broken plastic.
    #2
  3. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    I've been known to do that from time to time also. Got high centered on a log once. Lately it's been mud and water puddles.

    Which bars do you use?
    #3
  4. rdtele

    rdtele Adventurer

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    I went with the Wunderlich adventure-sized bars.
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  5. frtzl

    frtzl Mors longa, vita brevis

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    Bars, without a doubt. I dropped my bike in a 0mph dumbass parking lot move. The bars took the scratches and I was able to ride away from my shame.

    F
    #5
  6. SkiFastBadly

    SkiFastBadly A beer? Yes, please

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    Which do you plan on doing first, hitting a rock or tipping over?
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  7. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    No planning required! I know I'll do both, but not sure in which order. Hence this humble attempt to learn from the group which statistically may happen more often while acknowledging that both may (will) happen more often to the less skilled rider.
    #7
  8. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    Always good to be able to ride after the "event".

    2 votes for bars so far.
    #8
  9. SkiFastBadly

    SkiFastBadly A beer? Yes, please

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    Well then, a more serious answer:

    Crash bars prevent cosmetic damage in the event that you drop the bike. This is most likely to occur if you've just started riding.

    A skid plate, on the other hand, may prevent engine/oil pan/oil filter damage to the bike which would could leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere. On the other hand, this is unlikely unless you're a pretty aggressive rider and you ride in rocky/gnarly areas.

    The macho thing to do is go for the bashplate, as it conveys a certain adv 'c'est la vie' attitude toward plastic scratches, and a 'seriousness of purpose'.

    The smart thing is probably the crash bars, because nobody REALLY enjoys gouges in their plastic.
    #9
  10. triclavian

    triclavian Adventurer

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    Crash bars. Rarely will you go somewhere you need a skid plate but have little chance of tipping over. Crash bars are the greatest invention in the world.
    #10
  11. M N B

    M N B would rather be riding

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    Crash bars for sure.

    Bash plates are great, but I've yet to need one and I've needed the crash bars (just once, though).
    #11
  12. Desert Dave

    Desert Dave Enjoying the moment

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    I actually use my skid plate more often than the crash bars, so for myself the plate has probably done more to protect my bike. I'm not to concerned with cosmetics, but the crash bars go a long way in protecting the radiator, which could leave you screwed if it were busted.

    Having said that if I had to choose one or the other, it would be the crash bars simply because I never plan on using them, it just happens. Sometimes in really easy terrain. The skid plate on the other hand I usually know when the bottom is going to hit an I do it anyway only because the plate is there, if it wasn't I could adjust my riding a lot easier to not use it.
    #12
  13. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    More recommendations for bars and a couple of well reasoned bash plate comments. Being a reletive newbie to off road riding, bars may be a good first choice for me followed by a bash plate.
    #13
  14. Law Dawg (ret)

    Law Dawg (ret) Been here awhile

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    I have the Adventure-Spec crashbars and bashplate...like them both very much. Go for the crashbars first as your F8GS has a plastic bashplate already (a wimpy one but good for a low level bash) and the odds of you dropping your bike are much better than you single tracking Trials riding over logs and boulders at this point. Drop you GS and the price for repair (even excluding cosmetic repair) can hurt you bad. The very next farkle should be the bashplate to protect the oil filter and cooler doohickey. It all works out as the crashbars are installed first before the bashplate anyway (if you had them both in hand).
    #14
  15. twinjet

    twinjet Been here awhile

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    Sorry, not even a plastic bashplate on the F658GS. But good advice none the less.
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  16. Law Dawg (ret)

    Law Dawg (ret) Been here awhile

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    Brain fart...appologies.
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  17. Desert Dave

    Desert Dave Enjoying the moment

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    I'll bet you could buy a plastic skidplate for next to nothing from someone who upgraded an 800 an doesn't care about keeping the stocker, and I'm sure there's a ton out there. Double check me, but with the right hardware I think it will bolt right on.

    Law Dawg makes a good point, that as little protection as the plastic one gives it's a whole lot more than nothing, an at least gives you a fighting chance.
    #17
  18. Ducksbane

    Ducksbane Quaaack!!!

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    I have seen an F800GS with the standard "Bash plate" on a simple gravel road flick up a stone from the front wheel and break the oil cooler, putting the bike on a trailer. :eek1

    I have also seen so much mud build up on the oil cooler and filter that the engine overheated.

    It's a shame that both the 658 and 800 don't come with a real bash plate, but I suppose if you just travel from cafe to cafe for your latte's it's not an issue. :lol3 (Not a lot of accessible dirt roads in Germany I believe!)

    So my advice is to get the plate first. I don't know what brand of stuff your getting but in Australia the SW Motech stuff seems very well priced.
    #18
  19. ]I)Money

    ]I)Money D NOT I

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    bash plate, and a cheap-ass Wal mart set of pannier bags. 30$ will prevent almost all of the cosmetic damage that bars will (DAMHIK).

    I've ripped a hole in a oil filter before, so I'll take the plate, if I can only have one.
    #19
  20. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer

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    Crash bars first for sure! You can navigate your bike around tall rocks and stumps, and negotiate how you ride over or through ruts or low spots. But it's the lost-balance 0mph tip or low-speed off that's out of your control that you'll be wishing you had crash bars. And tank panniers won't do anything to protect the vital radiator in a tip-over. They could actually make it worse since they stick out off of the side of the bike's side plastics and would transfer the force directly to the radiator assembly more efficiently.
    #20