F8 Water Drowning Recovery

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by HighFive, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    Being new to BMW's, but not to bikes or wrenching, I couldn't stand it any longer.....had to strip my F8 naked for good looksee at her!

    A few thoughts on the passing scene:

    1) I think that must be the ECU under the seat...??

    2) Quite an airbox contraption under there...

    4) Where's the fusebox? That sneaky rat is still hiding from me.

    But I keep looking at that airbox and wondering: What happens if you drown this girl in a creek crossing? Looks like its gonna hold 4 gallons of water in the airbox and drain it into the engine after you stand it back up.

    So, what is the proper recovery procedure on an F8 after a water drowning?

    I'm all ears.....:ear

    HF :thumbup
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  2. MoToad

    MoToad Been here awhile

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    You obviously need to read up a bit more. No fuse box. It's called a Canbus system. And ther's drainage for airbox water.
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  3. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    Thanks, Toadride. Been reading voraciously for 3 weeks....just not crossed those tracks yet.

    I'll locate that drainplug(s) and bone up on CanBus. Bike came with a little Powerlet next to ingition key slot. The outlet is not working. So, what's the secret fix?

    HF
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  4. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    Dude you got serious reading to do.

    The outlet only works with key on and is limited to very low amperage. Remove that cover that it is in and you will notice that there is a spot exactly opposite where you can install another one. Wire that one to the battery directly with a fuse of course.

    If you flood out the bike be aware that when the airfilter dries it kind of shrinks and can change shape leak.

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  5. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    Apparently, I can't read fast enough. A problem that has long plagued me.

    So, if you plug in something with too big a load (say 30 watt heated vest into el 5-watt junior plug-o) what happens...nothing? No harm done (on a CanBus)?

    My little powerlet is dead! As in nada...nuttin...train ain't coming. That's with the key on and even the engine running. Maybe the connector plug is bad...?

    So, back to the water adventure....I'm liking the sound of this, I think. Stand the bike back upright....let the airbox drain on its own, empty the pipe and your good to go...eh?

    My bike will face many a deep water crossing in the months to come. Does the F8 stall without some snorkel mods?

    No...my reading hasn't caught up to that yet either. But I was going to try drinking the 12-pack before pushing that buy button for the D-3 fairing, as Docking Pilot encouraged. :lol3 See there...I've been reading something.

    HF :thumbup

    p.s. thanks for the tip on the air filter shrinkage, Motoriley.
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  6. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    The 800 will go in water that is really deep. The air intakes air very high. I ride with guys on a 1150GS, an HP2 and a DR650. They fear to tread where my 800 can go water wise. :D I only got my filter wet and blew out the headlights when the bike fell over in a lake....
    One thing I've learned is that if you do as much water as I have is that you better get good at changing wheel bearings. All mine were toast in 7000 kms.
    See some vids here.

    http://vimeo.com/14825990



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  7. raider

    raider Big red dog

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    The socket next to the key is wired through CANBUS - the computer has to recognise something is plugged in there to make it work. Quite a few guys have problems with some GPS units not being recognised - what method are you using to determine if it works or not? Multimeter? It won't tell you.

    Best bet is to re-wire a direct-to-battery power outlet.
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  8. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    Thanks for the info, Raider. That sounds like my problem. I've tried a gps, a little air compressor, and the controller (only) of my heated gear...just to see if the red light will come on. Probably not being recognized, as you said. Man, Canbus is some kind of sophisticated system, I reckon.

    I'll do as you and another have said. Except I think I'll wire up a complete auxillary power box (like a centec) and use that spare accessory outlet to simply power a contact relay. Then pull the main juice from the battery.

    Will that work? Will the CanBus recognize a Relay and give it some go juice?

    HF [​IMG]
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  9. raider

    raider Big red dog

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    Have a search through for forum - probably under a GPS topic - about the secret "spare connector" that lurks about the power socket. This may help you out.

    That said, the power outlet isn't like Windows USB, it doesn't need to know what's plugged in, just that something is. If you're getting nothing even with the engine running, maybe there is a problem there.

    Regardless, CANBUS doesn't control the battery, so if you want to wire up your own power box, just take it directly off the battery. What the computer doesn't know won't hurt it!
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  10. Firefight911

    Firefight911 Long timer

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    5 amps is all you get through the ZFE controlled circuit. CANBus is nothing magical and nothing to be mystified by. All it is is a protocol for monitoring electrical current flow. It is essentially an electronic "fuse." If it sense an over current, the "fuse" trips and stops the flow of electricity through this circuit. Remove the over current condition and the system can reset.

    CANBus has been around for years, is very reliable, and easy to use once you understand how to work with it.

    LINKY for info

    run a power relay off the bike system and tap the main battery through said relay for power. Hook it all through a centech or the like and be done with it. It's easy! The above link shows the connector you need. It is under the airbox cover and easy to find.

    One thing I highly recommend you do is run and SAE pigtail direct from battery to somewhere up near the steering head. With this you can now plug a Battery Tender in and, more importantly, run a cycle pump if you have a flat repair you need to affect. You can plug the pump in to this pigtail and not have to have the bike sourced power on.
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  11. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    Guys, the lack of fuses has nothing to do with CANbus. They can exist independantly of each other. CANbus is a term for a specific type of computer network system. Many vehicles run CANbus systems and also have fuse panels. It just happens to be that BMW decided they'd let a computer control the current flow in many circuits.
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  12. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

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    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/3913841?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="720" height="405" frameborder="0"></iframe>
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  13. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    Ho-chi-momma.....Motoriley! All I can say about your video is this:
    :bow :poser :clap :thumb

    Everyone needs to watch this to appreciate what an F800 is capable of, as well as one crazy rider. Your creative editing is superb. Truly, one of the most entertaining video clips I've seen in years. Outstanding job!



    Super thanks for the detailed info, 1bmwfan. Appreciate that Linky. This is exactly what I'm going to do. The bike already had the SAE pigtail, as described. The Gateway boys did that while breaking it in (emphasis on "break").


    Thanks for the clarification, Bayner. I'm learning something new every day (again). This is good stimulation for my caffeine-crusted brain.


    :eek1 :rofl :rofl :rofl

    Way to go ChiTown. Thanks for directing this thread back to the "Water" question.


    Who has taken a submerged dive on their F8 and is willing to admit it? What were the steps that followed to get her going again. I can easily use my imagination, but I'd appreciate hearing the events that followed and how the bike responded. If you'd be so kind...


    HF :thumbup
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  14. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    Even though I've seen this clip a few times I always find myself hoping you make it! :clap That must be a s close to maximum depth as you can get.

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  15. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    Knowing what I know now I would certainly check the air filter after a dunk. The big pain in the rear would be pulling the plugs. You need to remove all the tank plastic. Unplug a few electrical connectors, pull the entire airbox and have the correct thinwall deep socket to get the plugs out. Which I still haven't bought!! It is enough to make you wish you still had an 1150 where all this takes 5 minutes...
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  16. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

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    How about installing (fabricating) a reachable drain plug on the airbox...?

    Should be no big deal to tap the airbox (outside of the filter) in some fashion. Maybe pull a drain hose with a simple open/close valve (plastic) to a convenient position (like behind that little black plastic frame cover on the side).

    Just a thought. I don't plan to play submarine. But if it happened, this could make it a painless job to drain water from the airbox.

    HF [​IMG]
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  17. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    There is already a drain I believe since water would get in there when you drive in the rain with those forward facing intakes.

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  18. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

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    Thanks guys, I had forgotten about this video...

    Yeah, I was hoping I'd make it too. :rofl
    The water was much deeper, had bigger rocks and the current was much stronger than I originally thought. But if you know me, I hate turning around.... and since I could get in on video, who cares what happened!
    At least I know the limits of the GS, and also know she'll start back up and generate some steam after she sucks in some water.

    It was shortly after this when my rear bearings failed, so like you said, if you want to play in the water, at the very least be sure your that outer bearing/axle seal thingy is very clean and well greased. I know I had just put many thousands of miles on my bike with no maintenance besides oil before this video.... and bearing failure.

    Since then I have been far better at keeping that clean and greased and have put 30 some thousand miles on the bike with no bearing failure, compared to 12,000 at the first failure. maybe it was bad bearings, maybe the water got it and killed it...

    lesson learned.


    Like you Motoriley, I've always meant to have that socket needed to take the spark plugs out, but seem to always forget.... have to change that!
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  19. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    Went out the garage and checked on a spare spare plug and indeed it is 5/8" or 16mm. Both fit equally well. Now does anyone know if I need a super thin wall socket? Mine measured at 21.35 and 21.55 mm on the outside if that helps.

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  20. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

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    Now I really have no excuse... thanks!
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