F800GS aftermarket exhaust

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Bike4Fun, Nov 21, 2008.

  1. bodhizafa

    bodhizafa How hard can it be?

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    That looks perfect on the lava bike! :thumb
  2. bodhizafa

    bodhizafa How hard can it be?

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    Hey Griz, how hot does the Carbon exhaust get while riding? Do you think it would burn through some pannier bags?
  3. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer

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    The carbon portion of the exhaust stays a lot cooler than the stock can. THe aluminum intake cap and end cap get pretty hot still. However, my opinion is that that even though the carbon part stays a lot cooler than stock, it'd still probably melt through a dry bag or one of those giant loop bags if they're allowed to touch for an extended period of time.
  4. quint8

    quint8 n00b

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  5. BMW_BIKER_KEITH

    BMW_BIKER_KEITH Been here awhile

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  6. blueridgexplorer

    blueridgexplorer Adventurer

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    The Akrapovic slip-on pipe was on my 2010 GS when I picked it up from the dealer and looked and sounded good for about 50 miles, then my 8" Jesse bags arrived. Bad news, the pipe would not clear the bag mount and rear crossbar and had to be removed and the OE pipe reinstalled. I'm hoping Jesse will find a way to work with this pipe or I may have to sell it off.
  7. blueridgexplorer

    blueridgexplorer Adventurer

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    I went back today and tried refitting the Akrapovic slip-on and turning the muffler bracket around as someone had suggested. Still did not have enough room for the muffler and the Jesse Safari mounts, mount still hits at the top and the under fender crossbar hits the bottom of the tip? Anyone tried to run this combo with any luck?
    Guess its time to put the tools away as these farkles are eating into my riding time.
  8. wizze

    wizze Wizze = Wise

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    My MIVV carbon has been great. It looks and sounds awesome. IMO it fits the lines of the bike really well and I always get compliments of the looks and sound. I had a MIVV on my FZ1 so it was the 1st farkle on the GS. PJparts are great people to deal with.
  9. PJFZ1

    PJFZ1 Adventurer

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    Thank you sir!

    We honestly do think the MIVV's are the best pipes out there, for quality vs. price. We love 'em and have had 0 warranty issues.
  10. Gangplank

    Gangplank Advenchaintourer

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  11. Fireman

    Fireman Shazaam!

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    As far as aftermarket exhaust with Jesse's, I have had a great experience with my Remus titanium (non-hexacone, deeper growl). It fits just right, the Jesse's clear it with no problem, and it never corrodes in any way, no matter what. You can't say that about aluminum or carbon fiber.
  12. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer

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    Both aluminum and carbon fiber don't "corrode". I don't quite know what you're talking about.:scratch
  13. Gangplank

    Gangplank Advenchaintourer

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    :lurk :lurk :lurk
    :lurk
  14. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer

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  15. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    You have been mis-informed.......While road salt can corrode aluminum if it breaks through the finish......Nothing will touch the Carbon Fiber. Titanium will damage due to in part it`s thinner walls, and very little puncture resistance.
    CF....if protected against uv rays will last forever.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Only thing that will get to the CF is a bad wipe out....but then throw in a little kevlar.....like in the system above......:thumb:thumb

    Erling
  16. Fireman

    Fireman Shazaam!

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    OK, looks like I need to explain my comment. Here goes:
    I used to work at a fabrication shop as a prototyper for this research and design firm. While building things out of neat metals, I found that chemical reactions can do interesting things to both aluminum and carbon fiber over time. I call it "corrosion" because I don't know of a better term for it. Erosion, maybe? Anyway, when aluminum was exposed to bleach, it underwent a permanent change to the finish that could only be removed by removing the surface of the metal. It also was easily stained by rusting iron components, as well as heat. This was unanodized aluminum, so I assume that the mufflers would not see this effect unless the anodizing was worn off or scratched. With carbon fiber, I've seen some interesting corrosion happen where it meets aluminum, especially when it has been bonded by high-strength epoxies I know it's a chemical reaction, but I'm not a chemist so I couldn't say what is reacting. In any case, it bubbles up with white crust where it meets the metal. Back when I was working in a bicycle shop the guys used to call it "carbon cancer," caused a lot of warranty issues with the first Trek carbon fiber frames. Now I'm not saying that will happen to your exhaust - I've had an 1150R with carbon fiber exhaust that looked great for years until it was sold. I'm just saying I've never seen titanium react that way to anything yet. Just watch... tomorrow I'll find out that titanium melts when combined with my spilled coffee and S100's metal polish.:huh
  17. bxr140

    bxr140 Flame Bait

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    +1. Damn near everything corrodes to some degree or another. Aluminum alloys actually corrode pretty well if not anodized or otherwise coated in some way. Carbon composites and titanium are pretty resistant, really only having problems when used improperly (as noted above) or in really nasty environments.
  18. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    To cast a perfect CF set is not easy. Does`nt matter if you use polyester or epoxy. As you will see on the disclaimers of the bubbles imperfections. The " Cancer" as you refer to are bubbles that over time will fill with moisture.....cool ...and heat, that will slowly give in over time. The boating industry will refer to this as "gell coat blistering" However.... If you see this in a bond to aluminum in a test like you mentioned......It is fully contributed to using the wrong bonding materials (adhesives) and bonding the two materials inappropriately. I am not trying to pick on you or your past work, so please don`t take it as such. The trek frames had early issues, because the composite technology is still young in the bike industry, and truthfully just now are getting a hand on it. Making a bike frame is no simple task, and there have been a lot of trial and error in that field. Handlebars came in first perfected..... Seat posts....well it took a while....seen all the pic`s ...right...:D Now they are just getting the frames right. What will damage CF is not a chemical reaction.....nor corrosion....but the abrasive implication of being mounted next to a say metal object, that will vibrate....and slowly "file away of the composite" until it breaks. Back to the thread.....:D:rofl..... Most manufactures use a top coat of uv protecting lacquer......automotive style....to protect the epoxy from the bombardment of uv rays. if you scratch the can.......dent it....puncture it......you just fix it with a patch....sand it smooth...then re-coat it with lacquer. Once you dent the metal cans.....even more so with the TI.....they are usually done.
    The CF ones can be fixed.......:thumb:thumb

    Erling
  19. Fireman

    Fireman Shazaam!

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    Very interesting about that carbon fiber problem...I have not only seen the pictures but several scary looking shattered seatposts in the shop...and you're right, Trek was learning the hard way how to use CF. I didn't know the blistering was caused by moisture. Maybe because they just took a long CF tube and cut it into lengths for the frame pieces, instead of sealing the ends of the tubes like you would if you laid each one up individually?

    I do remember having a long conversation with the US Remus rep when I was buying that carbon fiber exhaust. He mentioned that UV was the only real threat to their CF material, and that I might see a gradual change in the tint of the muffler over time. I guess it might have gotten a little more "golden" colored, but not bad at all. I will say that I got that thing absolutely filthy (coast to coast without a bath) a couple times and it always cleaned up easy. It sure never came apart at all. I hope I have as much luck with my titanium, although I can tell it's pretty thin when I thump it with my fingernail. I'll tell you what, though: with those Jesse luggage racks in place, nothing is going to touch that muffler no matter which way I park the bike!
  20. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer

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    Aluminum doesn't really corrode too easily. It takes quite a bit to make it do so actually:
    http://www.keytometals.com/Article14.htm

    Corrosion resistance of aluminum.

    And the type of carbon fiber that is used on motorcycle exhaust just plain doesn't corrode:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_fiber

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_fiber-reinforced_polymer

    I'm not sure the aerospace industry would build entire airliners that carry hundreds of passengers out of aluminum alloys and carbon fiber if they would constantly corrode.

    :norton