F800GS - Coolant bleeder?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Dert Gerl, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. lmclamore

    lmclamore Citation Collector

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    My dealer also went the "bad radiator cap" route, replaced it, topped her off and 150 miles later...everything is working as it should.:thumbup
    #21
  2. ThinAir

    ThinAir Adventurer

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    Right or wrong, after I replaced my wife's 650 twin's radiator I too ran into the red triangle and found the fluid level low from not properly bleeding the system. I simply let the bike idle with the radiator cap off, while watching to make sure the bike was not overheating, and just filled the radiator a little at a time until it maintained a level near the neck of the fill area. Yes it burped out some fluid from time to time and got some drips here and there, but once I did that then filled the reservoir after placing the cap back on the radiator, it has been fine since. Simple, effective, and probably way wrong!!
    #22
  3. EnderTheX

    EnderTheX Dirt Rider

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    Any follow up on this method?... How did it end up?


    Anyone got more stories of bleeding the coolant system? :freaky
    #23
  4. RidingAgin

    RidingAgin Been here awhile

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    I followed this procedure, and it worked well on my 11 F650GS twin. For draining, i pulled the lower hose at the radiator and opened the vent screw. I did tip the bike to the right to get some additional fluid out (and shook it a little). When filling the radiator, have the bike on the side stand to lean it over to get more fluid in.

    Just finished a 15 mile test ride test ride after buttoning up the bike, operated fine. Thanks for the write up. :clap
    #24
  5. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    For draining the coolant the manual suggests removing the lower coolant tube from the oil cooler and letting the coolant drain from there ...

    tube is held in by one torx ... and sealed by an o-ring.
    Be careful not to loose the o-ring when you pull out the tube :deal
    #25
  6. Kaw4Life

    Kaw4Life Busted Adventurer

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    I don't suppose they could put a low point drain? Not fond of the pop the hose and "try" to catch the coolant.
    #26
  7. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    Just a thought....many don't change coolant in their cars for 5-10-15 years :hmmmmm
    #27
    Kaw4Life likes this.
  8. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv

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    what is wrong with catching it at the pump? Never made a mess out of it.
    #28
  9. Lost-n-Lovin-It

    Lost-n-Lovin-It Lurker

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    I gave this a try over the weekend and it worked great. Just be careful to not pinch the little o ring when you reinstall the bottom line on your oil cooler. Fortunately I got a new one for $.50 at the hardware store and now I'm good to go.

    Thanks for the post. Good info.
    #29
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  10. Nickhob

    Nickhob Armchair adventurer

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    +1 on being careful about the O ring :baldy
    #30
    charliektm400exc likes this.
  11. chudzikb

    chudzikb Been here awhile

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    At least on BMW cars, the coolant is a wear item and they want you to replace it every 3 years or so. Not sure how that applies to these cycles, but, it is my only BMW coolant experience.
    #31
  12. charliektm400exc

    charliektm400exc Been here awhile

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    Can anybody shed any light on what coolant temperature. The fan comes on at. After bleeding today I got the radiator up to 104c and the fan wouldn't come on. I had to stop as I needed to be elsewhere.

    On my KTM EXC the fan comes on around 90c

    Not sure if I have a problem, or I just need to wait longer.
    #32
  13. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    I don't know the kick-in temp, and looked in the manual but can't find a value................

    but my bike never gets beyond the normal 4-bars on the temp gauge (if you have the OBD display).
    #33
    charliektm400exc likes this.
  14. jh_

    jh_ n00b

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    I replaced my coolant yesterday. This was the second time I had done it on this bike and though I had no problems the first time round, this time proved tricky. Got it right in the end but it seems the tool could have made it easier.
    Other than ordering the BMW one, is there another tool than anyone would recommend to make this easier?

    The BMW Tool Part numbers per repair manual: Pump (No. 17 0 002) with main element (No. 17 5 521), plug (No. 17 5 522), spring clip (No. 17 5 523) and hose (No. 17 5 524)

    32.JPG

    31.JPG
    #34
  15. jh_

    jh_ n00b

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    The correct coolant type/spec for the F800GS is G48 also known as M5.0. Zerex (Valvoline) and Motorex both make version of this, as do others, so it not required to necessarily use the BMW Coolant. It was not listed on this thread so I thought it good to add it.

    IMG_33541.JPG
    #35
  16. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    I'm not clear on the function of the 2nd tool, but the first one looks like a pressure tester to determine if the cooling system has leaks.
    So not very helpful for just changing the coolant and getting the air out.....

    Here's an old thread of mine on the topic: http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/what-makes-the-radiator-fan-come-on.691458/page-2
    #36
  17. jh_

    jh_ n00b

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    After reading up on it some more I see that you are correct and this is just the pressure tester tool to check for leaks. The second tool is just the interface tool to connect the pressure tester to the radiator after you remove the cap. Thank you for the link to your post!

    K72_R17003b_small.jpg

    I did however find that Schwaben makes a Coolant Refill/Air Purge Tool that uses a venturi to create a vacuum and take out the air before putting in the coolant. PN#: 003466SCH01
    It is roughly ~$80 and if combined with the radiator cap adapter as above (if needed), it might make the whole process much easier and possibly trouble free.

    Capture.JPG

    Has anyone used one of these for changing the coolant on the F series twins, or any other bike, and if so was it successful at removing the air?
    #37
  18. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Well... damn ... I've never seen one of those......
    Do you pull a vacuum on the system using compressed air to drive the venturi, then while somehow holding the vacuum on the system "inject" the new coolant?
    #38
  19. jh_

    jh_ n00b

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    The vacuum created inside the cooling system is enough of a pressure differential for the coolant to flow into the system without the need for additional pressurization on the coolant supply side during filling. The coolant will continue to flow into the system until the pressure difference is equalized, at which point you have a whole system full of coolant at atmospheric pressure. If done this way, there is no air in the system before filling with coolant and since no air is introduced during filling either, there is no air to bleed out afterwards.

    Capture.JPG

    Here is a clip by ECS tuning showing the process. They also sell this tool.
    #39
  20. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    That is pretty cool, it should work well.

    It would seem that a small amount of air from the suction tubing going to the bottle of coolant gets introduced into the system,
    but I expect it is not significant.
    #40