F800GS Toolkit needs

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by itsatdm, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. stephen.stallebrass

    stephen.stallebrass Been here awhile

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    Aug 19, 2009
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    274
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    Peterborough, UK
    I used the K60s on my F8 for my trip to Mongolia and Siberia this year... can't say I liked how they handled on the road, especially in the wet. I think I got one puncture on the front K60 in Siberia from a spoke after the rim tape got displaced and the bead was very easy to break on this with just my hands or standing on the tyre wall. I got one puncture in the rear K60 in Mongolia and I broke the bead easily with the sidestand. However, when I got back to the UK I put some Conti Trail attacks on, now that I was back onto tarmac, but on this occasion the rear K60 bead was a bitch to break even with the sidestand. I did eventually manage to do it after considerable effort. For off road (dual purpose), I still prefer the TKC80...I just wish I could get more miles out of one.
  2. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
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    4,150
    Plug change definitely requires a thin wall socket.

    Most will not fit and you run the risk of getting it stuck in the well.

    You do not want that to happen.

    If you have any doubts, be real careful when you begin, I secured my socket to the extension with a good amount of duct tape just in case it was going to stick and I would have to use some pull on it, maybe even a smear of WD-40 would help a little. The extension I chose was a long T-handle Motion Pro type. Changing the plugs is a pain in the ass as you have to remove the cowl, the side panels, the battery, the air box assembly, etc... and then you get to the coil sticks.

    If you are really careful and are very patient, you can use your fingers to gently pull the sparkplug cap/boot/coil (aka coilstick) deal. Do not get tempted to grip it by the back part and break the plastic tang with the connector. These are expensive pieces. I put a smear of electrical grease on the coilstick to hopefully ease removal the next time, though I hope to finally get the right tool, the dealer here will not sell any BMW tools to customers. No other choice, they have the only 3 dealerships in this part of the country, a monopoly. You can bend the flexible rubber covers back and use them for extra grip, they are pretty tough.

    By the way, if you ride in Mexico with an F650 with mag style wheels, include a flexible valve extender for your tire valve. Many of the Pemex locations only have a long chrome handled air line chuck. A few still have the little rounded ones, but many have only the long handled ones.
    Of course, you have a compressor in the tool kit you have made, but grabbing a handy airline and filling your tires is faster than rooting through your tool kit and messing around. Convenience more than anything else. A 90 degree extender works just as well, couldn't get one when I was shopping, only got the flexible one that works fine.
  3. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Mike:
    I just bought of these: http://www.marcparnes.com/BMW_Plug_Tool.htm
    I'll be using it for the first time after the holidays .... I'll let you know how/if it works.
  4. ebnelson

    ebnelson Frozen rider

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    Nov 16, 2004
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    Boulder
    I'm surprised I didn't see the GS911 CAN bus interface listed in toolkits. It will definitely be in my "toolkit" for next year's trips. Talk about removing some guess work! I wish I had a tool as useful as this for my Sprinter van (yeah, I know about the ScanTool II).
  5. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    Will the GS9-11 tool inform you of a duff fuel pump controller?
    Mine went in a Mexican mountain town on Saturday, 250kms from home so I did the Tim Cullis bypass procedure and rode it back. The troubleshooting was easy, it was obvious it wasn't the clutch nor the sidestand as it would turn over but no smell of fuel.
    Used the Leatherman in my tank bag to do the job.
    You need a T-10 and patience, or just use the longnose of the pliers on the Leatherman.
    I am building a bypass cable out of the old controller, if you do not buy the available cable from aftermarket that lets you connect to your battery, the pump goes on and off with the key. If you buy the bypass cable that goes to the battery you have to unplug it when you stop.
    If you can afford it, a spare fuel pump controller is a good investment. But the bypass will get you back and if you roll your own cable you are going to be fine the next time it quits. I am going to zip tie the bypass cable I am making to a good spot under the seat and also a T-10 key with it, it will then be about a 90sec unplug and then plug and play.
    Keep an old no good controller and gut it for the parts you need.
  6. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    I have one and carry it with me on longer trips.
    I have an old Thinkpad X61 with a solid state hard drive that does not care about being bounced around that is my road PC for e-mail and such ... I have the GS-911 software loaded and am ready. Many intermittent and frustrating faults will be logged in a way the 911 can give you some clues .... It will certainly not help in all situations, but since I own one, I always take it!
  7. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    I'm with you MM - before my next trip I'll be building an adapter cable to go from the Gerbing plug I have at the front of my seat to the fuel pump ... will just unplug it when I stop...
  8. ebnelson

    ebnelson Frozen rider

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    Glad to hear you were able to get running again. Your bypass cable seems like a good thing to put in an emergency spares kit. I would have expected a code of some sort to be generated from a faulty fuel pump controller, although it might not have been very informative. Certainly, on board micro-controllers do not replace mechanics. A prepared mechanic may want to use all tools available.
  9. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    This is the interesting thing, will the GS-911 give you the fuel pump controller fault code or will it leave you guessing?
  10. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Good question ... for OBD compliant systems, the fault codes are somewhat standardized e.g. :

    http://engine-codes.com/make/bmw

    I've posted a question on the GS-911 asking if such a list exists for the bikes..................

    Edit:

    Got an answer quickly (for different model bike, but likely the same):

    Error 10167 - Output stage to electric fuel pump

    Symptoms: Idling irregular. Battles to start. Fault appears to start intermittently. Bike may start and ride, then will appear to have fuel starvation.

    Repair: It is a little aluminum unit with fins on... (at fuel tank). Check the o-ring of this unit. Unscrew the unit and check for moisture in the cavity below it. Use moisture repellent spray and contact cleaner to clean this device.
    If not corrected replace

    This does seem to me to be something the computer can monitor to an extent.
    If the computer tells the controller to throttle up or down and then sees that the pressure sensor on the fuel rail do something unexpected ... etc...
  11. Full Power

    Full Power Long timer

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    Location:
    Homer, Alaska
    The 2013 model of F800 has a few changes:
    The 800 fasteners are just about all Torx vs hex or Allenhead.

    So to work on the bike you need the following:

    left control housing... ?? smaller than T10 ?
    T20 throttle assembly
    T25 fairings, control, body work
    T30 muffler mount, signals, motor chassis, rotor
    T40 triple clamp, brake pivot, rear rotor, brake line
    T45 body, exhaust mount, fork axle pinch bolts, controls
    ..... Bar Ends changed to T45

    Torx socket
    E10 handlebar clamps
    E12 Front Caliper brakes

    13mm Chain tension bolt AND lock nut, requires TWO 13mm spanners
    17 mm Front Axle
    24mm Rear axle
    ...... Drain plug is now 10mm Allen wrench
  12. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    I dont recall much hex nor allen on the old F8.
    That list looks the same as for my F658 09 model.
  13. txtallywhacker

    txtallywhacker screw schedules

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    Oct 22, 2009
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    evans, co
    where are yall finding those tool bags to velcro under the seat? i have searched high and low and cant find anything.
  14. Pangia

    Pangia Been here awhile

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    Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
    For the 2013 F800GS, I would suggest adding an E8 Torx Socket for the stock gear shift lever....that is what mine is...
  15. moto74

    moto74 displaced

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    Left control housing is a T8.
  16. AussieRidin

    AussieRidin n00b

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    Sep 7, 2010
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    Location:
    Sydney, Australi
    Just checked over my Australian 2013 F800 GS and here are a few tool specs which I haven't seen mentioned, or seem to differ slightly from other posts:


    • T9 for left side indicator/horn control housing screws
    • 16mm socket or ring spanner for rear sprocket nuts
    • 21mm socket(s) for the swingarm pivot bolt & nut (ring spanner won't fit in there)
    • 24mm socket for rear axle (ring spanner wont fit in there properly but might work if that's all you've got)
    Cheers.:beer
  17. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    I can get a 24 mm wrench on the rear wheel with no issues. Motion pro makes a tire iron with a box end 24 that is nice. For a lot of the oddball sizes that you don't use regularly a pair of vice grips or an adjustable wrench will do in a pinch. The vice grips make a good emergency shift lever and a million other uses.
  18. sturgeon

    sturgeon Long timer

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    +1 The MP tire iron/24mm works just fine; I've used it on the road numerous times.
  19. dirtysouthjacket

    dirtysouthjacket Been here awhile

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    Charlotte, NC
    Thanks for the awesome simplification of what would take me a long time to figure out! Kudos to those that have posted. Trying to make sure I have a real kit for a few trips this year. Tired of just throwing tools in one of my cases that may or may not save me. So far I haven't needed much.

    Did anyone figure out how long of a thin wall 5/8" spark plug socket is needed? Just trying to get the shortest one that will still work. There is quite a range for sale. Thanks in advance! :clap
  20. Bumbobee

    Bumbobee Been here awhile

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    May 3, 2013
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    Anyone got a complete tool kit list for the 2013 F800GS?