Faceplant Question....

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Sniperx, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. dmason

    dmason goofball

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    Jebus, this guy again? And he's up to 2,100 whole miles? Where DOES he find the time? Amazing.
  2. scootrboi

    scootrboi Long timer

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    Sniper
    A sniper is a highly trained marksman who operates alone, in a pair, or with a sniper team to maintain close visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or distances ... Wikipedia
  3. mountaincadre

    mountaincadre Been here awhile

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    Yawn.
  4. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    Thank you, I try. 2100 miles in 2 months, setting up for a 10,000-12,000 average per year. Guess it won't be good enough until I do that same stretch in 48 hours or some sillyness. One thing at a time guys...

    No more drops, saves, or near misses though.
  5. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer

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    Here's another saying for you. "You're either part of the problem or part of the solution."

    Sounds like you've decided it's easier to go with the flow (based on your "when in Rome" reference) and be part of the problem. I get it. It seems like such an impossible monumental task for one person to affect change so why should you bother? Well, because it's the right thing to do.

    How does one person affect change when the issue is on such a grand scale? Good question. I received some keen insight from an aging Italian gentleman on this subject several years ago. He had this huge home with multiple stone patios complete with ornate railings. Hundreds, maybe thousands of these ornate cast concrete stiles were used to make the railings. The caps to the railings were slab concrete. There were multiple stone terraces, steps, rotundas, etc. The place was gorgeous, like a partially finished palace.

    I walked around back of his home and saw his work area. One single mold from which he made the stiles one at a time. Same for the concrete rail caps. Also a large pile of rough stone he would pull from and cut by hand for the stone work. Upon seeing this I realized he was single handily building this incredibly beautiful mansion by hand and one piece at a time.

    I asked him: "How in the world do you keep motivated with such a huge project that shows so little progress each day? Seems like an impossible task!" He asked me "How would you eat an Elephant?" I said " I don't know." To which he replied "One bite at a time."
  6. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    Nice....I'll keep that in mind.


    *****IF YOU READ NOTHING ELSE IN THIS THREAD, READ THIS******

    I think I'm about ready to close this discussion. I leave this post to future readers of this train wreck.

    I am a new rider, new as they come. I am 33 years old and have driven on California highways for 14 years and 4 years in Japan. I have driven very powerful cars (BMW 850i) and very nimble cars (autocross Fiero GT). I have driven slow cars (Diesel Toyota Landcruiser) on and off road. I have had life experiences unique to me which have shaped my attitude and behavior.

    I made an (somewhat) uneducated choice of which bike to buy, a 2002 BMW 1150GS Adventure. I put a lot of faith in what the "experts" had to say regarding this bike. The day the bike arrived, these "experts" had me so worked up I was almost afraid to pull it into the driveway...almost.

    2300 miles and 2 months later, I don't think I could be happier. I've tested other smaller/different bikes now and none of them feel right. Theres no way I could imagine myself on a sport bike all splayed out for hours. I have lots more to learn on how far the GS can be pushed, but right now, I'm content with my choices. Would a smaller bike have been a better choice? I don't think so. Could I have been an Olympic waterpolo player (if you read the whole thread you know where that comes from), possibly. Am I worse off for these choices.....who knows....I do know I don't regret starting with the 1150.

    To new riders. Listen to the experienced riders, but take their advice with a shaker of salt. Listen to the ones that have been your specific route and ride what you want to ride and the way you want to ride. Don't worry how many licenses are in their wallets or their post count. Look at the color of their hair, look how long they have been riding, look what kind of riding they do. Sit on a few bikes, find the one that fits (I got lucky on the GS) then go reading about how it handles for new riders. Personally, I'm glad I didn't go for something smaller, sportier, "more fun". I would have gotten into some trouble I'm sure. Take the MSF course...there are quite a few things you never considered when driving a car. Don't let anyone talk you out of your choices if you've truly educated yourself on them. Own your choices, good and bad. Don't let the "experts" scare you. Stay in control and remember the vehicle is only as powerful as your right hand. A Ferrari can be driven at 30mph as it can 150mph...you don't always have to be "on it". Know what is safe for you and your situation. Despite what the "experts" say, you can control yourself...you CAN enjoy a big bike as a first timer. Drive like you are mentally bigger than a car. Take up more space than you would allow in a standard car. This ensures you have adequate room all around you to evade various problems.

    Finally, go with the flow. Don't try to be a hero, don't be a teacher, don't try to change the driving world around you. You flit in and out of each others lives so fast theres no impression made...its better to get home in one piece than it is to show other the right way to drive. 9 times out of 10....you'll just get the finger. The other 10% of the time....no one cares. Keep yourself in order, stay in your lane, relax, enjoy your ride.

    Lastly, take a deep breath....breathe. Before you set out for the day, just before you release the clutch for the first time, take a breathe and clear your mind. After you drop your bike for the first time in traffic, shut off the engine and take a deep breathe...then proceed. When someone pulls out in front of you....slow and breathe. Just breathe.
  7. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    That's great that you love your bike and all, but wait until you have to pick it up riding off-pavement solo a few times in a day. Or wait until the momentum of a heavy bike going over catapults you into the tree you were going to narrowly avoid if you stayed upright. Or wait until you get trapped under your heavy bike until somebody can come by and lift it off of you. Even wait until you see somebody that passed a BRC without a problem hit a bad pothole on their new GSX-R and hamfist the throttle to 60MPH in 1st gear in a matter of mere seconds, holding on for dear life as the revs go shooting up accidentally. These are just a few reasons that many experienced riders don't recommend a heavy or powerful bike for noobs, especially if leaving the pavement. They aren't generally as forgiving of noob mistakes, even if one is trying to ride sedately. Luckily, for it's displacement and heft, a GS isn't exactly a rocket or a bear to handle.
  8. dmason

    dmason goofball

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    Since you're about to "close the thread" (is arseface a mod all of a sudden?), let me take this last opportunity to say go f*ck yourself.
  9. tkent02

    tkent02 Long timer

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    I want to be last! Fuck you idiot!
  10. Anonawesome

    Anonawesome Scenic Rider

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    What the hell did I just read. You all fucking suck and I hate you.
  11. Travex

    Travex Lost is found

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    Human nature, testosterone/estrogen/adrenaline, bad mood, good mood, elation, drunk, talented, terminal, high, stupid, careless, unknowing, fun, danger, showmanship, insecurity, style, anger, confidence, newly-licensed, pre-mortem excitation.

    Other than those I'm at a loss as to why people would do such things.

    Sometimes asking why can only be answered with do or done.
  12. mountaincadre

    mountaincadre Been here awhile

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    Think of the children:fyyff
  13. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    Just checking in....

    Ticked over 3200 miles this morning.

    All is good. Nothing major going on. Found a great local road to practice on deep in the mountains. Getting smoother. Road in the rain for the first time a couple nights ago. Had the ABS fire for the first time as the rear tire went over a painted stripe, nothing interesting...just the ABS sound and a twitch in the handle. Still topping out at 75mph. Not dead yet, not even close....I'm working on it though.


    A thought. If the speed limit is a rule or a guideline...which many freely disobey...why should others get chastised for breaking the social rule of "left lane for passing". They're breaking the same kind of rule (if not an even weaker one) than you are by speeding.


    I'll check back in at 6000 miles or 6 months...I'm supposed to be dead by then according to the "experts".

    P.S. Still lovin' the GS...on pavement and fire roads.

    PSS: Review this page for a thorough understanding of your and other state laws: http://www.mit.edu/~jfc/right.html . According to the chart and my understanding, I can drive in any lane as long as it is keeping up with "normal traffic" and do not need to yield to speeders. When dropping below "normal traffic" you must move right until an acceptable lane is found for your rate. Left lane is for "normal" speeds as dictated by traffic around you. The vehicle code actually states this is all regardless of the speed limit. So if the average speed is 70mph, you may drive 70 in any lane regardless of the signage. This rule changes as lane numbers decrease. The TWO right lanes are actually available for slower traffic on 4+ lane highways allowing overtaking on the right or left hand side.