Ferry to Colombia!!!

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Chiriqui Charlie, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    The only thing Central America and South America have in common is the language, and even that is a Barely.

    Spending all your time in one country is like parking yourself in front of one entre at the smorgasboord. Go ahead and fill up on the tacos, but then you won't have any room for the ceviche or the parilla.

    The cost of shipping from Panama to Colombia is the same as shipping from the US to Colombia.

    If you want to spend a year riding Mexico, I really don't care. If you want to skip Central America, I really don't care. I mean, I don't begrudge you your version of adventure.
  2. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

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    Plenty to see in Mexico and Central America, and no one's ever had time to see and do it all yet. You could easily spend years exploring, maybe longer.

    On the other hand, there's a reason why most riders prefer South America and start piling on the superlatives as soon as they get on the road in Colombia. You'll see.

    Mark
  3. Yappei

    Yappei Adventurer

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    Not a big deal to pass up anything - depends on your objectives, time available, whatever. However, after having ridden a large part of Latin America, Asia, and Europe the border crossings are part of the experience. Sometimes easy, sometimes frustrating - for example the border crossing between Costa Rica and Nicaragua or Argentina and Chile near Mendoza - depending on the day, time, and immigration officer the experience can vary dramatically. It's an attitude. As we say here in Costa Rica - Pura Vida.

    This being said - I live in Costa Rica and I have had the opportunity to ride most roads in the country and I have to say the experience is incredible. There are places totally unbelievable and I would not pass for anything in any other country. Mountain passes, coastal roads, northern plains, small villages, extreme high end resorts, tent camping, off asphalt, on asphalt, the unexpected, all of it is here and I would have hated to miss it as part of my overall Latin American experience.

    Triumph Tiger Explorer, Graphite, Jessie Luggage.
  4. ADV Fool

    ADV Fool Been here awhile

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    While I cannot give an opinion on shipping to Colombia I CAN speak a little to CA. I've just returned from a seven week adventure of Mexico & CA and did make it as far south as Yavisa, PAN. The border crossings were some quick and some slow, some easy and some hard. Some frustrating and some happy as a lark. I had to learn that they are just part of the adventure. One trip certainly does not an expert make but I am REALLY glad I did it and I WILL return. Time and desire need to be the riders choices.

    Just one riders opinion,

    ADV Fool
  5. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    My guess is Sjoerd Bakker is about the closest rider to seeing all of Mexico and Central america and its taken him 27 years of exploring!
  6. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    Not quite true.
    Most people in Central America speak Spanish?
    Most people in South America speak Portuguese?
    :D

    It is more than barely. Or should it be less than barely?
  7. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    It's the accents and use of words that makes the Spanish completely different.

    The Mexico spanish is completely fucking different from the Chile spanish. When I got to Chile I couldn't understand anybody. In Argentina it was a little better, but the people on the farms in remote places speak a spanish that I can't understand. My uncles's wife is from Argentina and she lives in Panama and often when she's talking all I can do is say to my uncle, Your wife is very beautiful but I have no fucking idea what she's saying.

    Also there are millions and millions of Indians that don't speak Spanish at all, especially in Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, and Peru. It's not unusual for the Kuna, Embera, and Wounan of Panama to not speak Spanish. I can't speak to Bolivia or Brazil because I've never been there.
  8. ElReyDelSofa

    ElReyDelSofa Desubicado

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    And then there is my Ecuadorian cousin's French husband who I have never ever understand a single thing he says in Spanish. What an accent...!
  9. norschweger

    norschweger Been here awhile

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    I am trying to figure out what to do in the following weeks as I have to be back in Germany for my sisters wedding in the beginning of july.
    First of all, there is the time question: I am in Antigua/Guatemala heading to El Salvador tomorrow. What is a realistic time that I need for all the different countries between here and Panama? Would the 14th of june be a good date? (steelrat) or rather the 6th or the 20th oj june(independence)? considering that I have to find a place to store the bike in Columbia (for maybe 2 or 3 months)
    The other option is to store it in Panama, but as far as I know, I would not have that many days to store it there?
    Any arguments for or against the different boats?

    Thanks for any help!
  10. Catours

    Catours Guatemala Tourer

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    Hi norschweger

    This time last year I rode from Antigua to Portavela Panama.
    I returned to Antigua.
    I wanted to go to Colombia. ''still do, just no ferry, for me it would of been a fantastic way to cross, for cost and convenience, I have a Gold Wing Trike, a bit more difficult to just throw it on a sailboat.
    Anyway I saw what I wanted in 6 weeks, remember there and back.
    I have been to all these countries several times, so I never had to stop at all the great places, as I had done half of the destinations and stops previously.
    So my simple conclusion is take five/six weeks to Panama, and then get to Colombia.. Have a good ride; nearly forgot, and then the Wedding!:freaky

    Best
    Dave Drudge.
    OP's Guatemala
  11. GuateRider

    GuateRider Long timer

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    Panama is easier for longtime storage then Colombia .
  12. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer

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    Legally or not so legally:ear

    I do know Colombia is a better place to have a bike stored, closer to the really good stuff:lol3
  13. GuateRider

    GuateRider Long timer

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    Legally !! :evil
    $100 a month in a bonded warehouse (Girag)
  14. norschweger

    norschweger Been here awhile

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    what would be the time limit then? Longer than if I find someone to store it privately?
  15. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer

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    It still might be legally cheaper to store in no man's land between Colombia and Venezuela in a storage building, a legal way just paying for storage while your bike is not temporarily imported in either country. I know C5 on here who works in VZ and CO has done the multiple times and has a good lady who takes care of the storage for long periods of time without trouble. There is a thread here or on HUBB about it.

    Bonded at $100 a month in Panama is a legal way that should allow you to store it there for nearly any length of time you are willing to pay for AFAIK

    Illegal ways are cheaper but that's how it works, little risk involved:lol3

    I've left mine in VZ and CO multiple times the shady ways without trouble yet.
  16. GuateRider

    GuateRider Long timer

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    If you store privately your bike is still in Panama, if yopu store it in a bonded warehouse you have to return your TVIP and your bike is technically not in Panama anymore .
    I don't know the limit or if there is even one , but yes you can definitely store it longer than privately .
  17. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Adios Mexico

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    Free zone in Colon could do the same, but you'd need to "know" somebody probably. I checked my bike out of Panama by just telling the customs office at the free zone that I was putting it on a boat for Colombia. They cancelled out the temporary import, but then I just rode out the gate and down the road to go put it on a boat about 20 minutes away in a different town. They didn't actually physically verify that it REALLY left the country.
  18. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

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  19. norschweger

    norschweger Been here awhile

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  20. Yappei

    Yappei Adventurer

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    It's a small world. I "think" I "remember" leaving a Geocash in the upper deck, second door from the stern, port side - if so, its the same ferry.