Film Camera Megathread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by 68deluxe, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    An inmate recently posted wonderful pictures which he took with a (just purchased for $150) Mamaya RB67. I have long lusted after a Hasselblad but stuck with 35mm film and onto DSLR's. I may try to find a cheap medium or large format camera to try my hand at landscape pics. Anyone have any likes/dislikes regarding (larger format) older mechanical film cameras?
    #1
  2. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    Can't imagine you won't find Hassi's CHEAP today - film is still out there in adequate supply thanks to professionals and $20K digital backs.

    I've got a nice setup of Hasselblad but it's in storage in CA - The shameful truth is that I take 99% of my photos with an iPhone. kind of sad, but they have a kodak quality to them and at least I have something.

    I should dig out my Leica M3 and take some photos this winter with B+W up on the ski hill - similar to some I have from my Dad back in the early 60's.

    I just wish I felt like taking photos again - that would help a lot.
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  3. Buccleuch

    Buccleuch Resistance is futile.

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    My love of photography began when my dad happened into a Minolta SRT101 outfit. All of the photographs my family had taken that I'd seen prior to that were the grainy (110 film), fuzzy (plastic lenses), less-than-impressive snapshots taken by various Kodak Instamatics. The Instamatic was revolutionary in that it brought cheap photography to the Baby Boomers raising their kids in the '60's, and hopefully it spurred some on to better photographic equipment.

    The SRT101 captured many very nice images, and it prompted me to learn more about photography. When it came my turn, I bought a Nikon FM, a beautiful, well-made SLR that I still have today. From the FM, I moved up to an F3 (still have that one, too), and later, an F100. I sold the F100 some years ago.

    I always shot 35mm, but had a strong desire to move to medium format after meeting Rodney Lough and chatting with him for a bit at one of his showings. I never made that leap, though.

    Now that prices for good used medium-format gear are coming way down, I might become interested again. Part of my resistance to MF equipment, though, was the heavy glass. I shoot a lot of stuff while backpacking, and I don't want to lug around 6lbs of tripod, 2lbs of camera, and 8lbs of glass...

    W.A.
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  4. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    I've got maybe 4 film SLR's collecting dust, they take pics once a blue moon if that :cry but they're all worth not much more than a song so it makes no sense to sell em and most of my glass works so I have fun with em on occasion. I just wish I had the setup to develop silver based films still.
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  5. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    Used hassi's still go for $1K plus, the time to get them was around 5 years ago. The RB67 is still cheap (IMHO) because they are gigantic compared to a 500/501.
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  6. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    My second camera was a SRT201, my first was a Yashika GSN. My next was a Nikon F2 and I wish I never sold it. I blew a chance to get a hasselblad kit (503 iirc) from the BX when I was in kuwait 1995 for $2500.
    #6
  7. BerndM

    BerndM Shiftless One

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    I have a few :D film cameras left over from "back in the day".
    Some of these go back to the early 1900's.
    BTW...these are NOT just tossed in here. They are all laid in the there very gently so as no to shift around.
    There's about 100 of them, most of which are in working condition.
    I got these from my Dad after he passed away.


    [​IMG]
    #7
  8. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    LOL! No shit. I took a class with Ben Benschneider back in the summer of 1980. Ben was a retired Nat Geo photog, he travelled with three or four of the largest Halliburton cases packed with Hasselblad hardware - I mean, he had tens of thousands of dollars. I never saw him more than a dozen paces from his microbus due to the weight of his hardware.

    I walked hundreds of miles with a Nikon F2 and one or more lenses. I don't know what I would do today - last major trip I took was Machu Picchu and I bought a digital camera for that trip, 3 MP, long obsolete.

    Carrying the 500 CM and maybe the 80 mm with one back, the folding viewfinder would only be about 50% heavier than the F2, maybe not even as much. I guess if you are serious about it, why not? I've seen guys packing 20 pounds of camera gear before - I've done it - I carred a 500mm cat. to Annapurna and Everest base camp. Did not use it much.

    My 500mm hasselblad lens weighs about 3x what that cat weights and it long enough to play baseball with...well, if one were crass enough.
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  9. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    My favorite camera with a great piece of glass. Not a great image but the lens looks cool.

    [​IMG]
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  10. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    I just bought a 50mm 1.2 manual lens to use with my (new to me) D700, I just like the feel of all that metal/glass. makes me slow down a bit and think about the picture.
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  11. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    WANT!!!!

    :tb

    Though with the prices falling a D2x might be in my future :evil as my I don't care what conditions I put it through camera.

    Quick note, if you know your way around cameras N70's are under 40 bucks now in excellent condition :eek1 I shot concerts with one for a few years so even though it's a plastic-y body it can take some abuse. AF....well I never used it on that camera so I can't comment :lol3 and the menu system is what gave these guys a bad wrap but it's a film camera....learn to change the ISO/shutter speed and set the metering and you're good.
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  12. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2013/...nshifting-with-the-nikon-f5-by-mark-hutchens/

    Downshifting with the Nikon F5

    By Mark Hutchens

    I was in the south of France recently on holiday and a close friend who lives there loaned me a small BMW with a very big engine in it. If you accept that nearly the entire world has speed limits hindering our enjoyment of such power, it could easily be judged as overkill. However, the sensation of driving that car was incredible. The handling, the torque, the fit and finish, all combined together to make driving an engaging experience. And then the rare bit of straight road allowed for that brief and exhilarating (law breaking) jaunt. Then at the end, a quick downshift, release of clutch and enter the curve at a sane and legal speed. There are qualitative differences in the driving experience, even if it is just getting from point A to B.

    This sensation came to me again as I held for the first time an unused Nikon F5 won on eBay from a pawn shop at an embarrassingly low price. For less that $200 I had a mint example of what was the top professional SLR from Nikon for years. It felt like the BMW in my hands, and as I burned through my first rolls of Tri-X and Portra, I relished in a sort of guilty pleasure that I was taking snapshots with a weapon. The finder is the biggest and brightest I’ve ever owned from Nikon. Even my old man eyesight can manually focus with my old AIs lenses. In autofocus, the assuredness and speed of operation is unknown in my medium format rig, even if the negatives are tiny. This camera focuses my nifty fifty like a paper shredder does tissue. An AF-S lens? It’s as if it is tracking my eyeball to focus. The fit and finish is extraordinary, its lightning fast film advance felt like the BMW’s torque.

    A friend with a D800 called me a Luddite and winced as if in pain when I handed it to him. It is heavy. I suggested we drop both from waist height and see which one still worked afterwards. He declined. Why on earth would I buy such a big, heavy antique? Isn’t it overkill just for a 35mm negative? I suppose it is, in the same way that BMW is, if all you want to do is move without having fun along the way and not appreciate the nuance in the technology that got you there. Am I using the F5 for its’ intended purpose as a professional sports camera? Nope. Do I need 8 frames per second with 35mm film? Do I really want to chew through a 36 exposure roll of film in 4.5 seconds? Not anymore than I want that speeding ticket, but you never know. There might be a straight road somewhere and my daughters’ real smile may come at any second.

    I usually don’t participate in the on line realm because I see too many “purist” folk who think photography is only for art and not for process, as if there are that many artists out there to begin with. I value the process and I accept that my snaps aren’t always artistic. Part of that process is feeling the nuance and capability in the technology that gets me from point A to B, even if it is only a snapshot at the end. I suspect that I will expose rolls of film in my F5 I will never develop, but I will revel in the process itself.

    A mint condition F5 costs half the price of the EVF on your most recent camera. Go get one, and don’t let the purist police write you a ticket for enjoying your equipment for its own sake.
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  13. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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  14. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    There is a story somewhere about a photog who was being seriously hassled by some 'hippie' at a protest, photog wrapped strap of F2 around wrist, silenced protester and went on snapping photos with camera.

    Leica Magazine had a story about a skydiver who lost his M series at about 1,500' and found it still operational in a field.

    My M3 Leica is from 1956, older than me, and I expect it will outlast me as well.
    #14
  15. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    The F5 is a solid modern performer. Far from an antique. The precision and features are everything you want in a camera. I've been buying up manual focus glass lately 'cause I cannot afford top shelf AF stuff. Nice stuff. The 50 f1.4 cost me $100 shipped. Nikon still sells it new for $469.99. I have a couple nice AF lenses and the F5 focus speed is awesome. It is truly every bit a top of the line camera regardless of medium used for the recording. I don't use it as much as I should.

    I picked up a NIB MF-28 back for it. I need to finish up a roll of film so it can be installed. Learning how to use the custom functions is more difficult than a newer digital but some time and effort and it becomes clear.

    This is my first pro camera and it's everything I heard they are. I had the $$ and opportunity for an F6 but after handling both I preferred the F5. I had some film scanned but they did a crap job and it looks like it. I'll send it out to North Coast and post some examples later.
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  16. Sniper X

    Sniper X De Oppresso Liber

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    I have a nice Bronica ETRS that I used a lot more five or so years ago. I love the camera and have a few backs and lenses. It is a fine camera. I would look for one of them or a RB series camera for a better price point than the Hassies since they tend to still be selling for a lot for film cameras, especially their lenses. I got this system in trade for some work performed on a CCTV system but you can find a entire Bronica system with a body, a couple backs and a few nice lenses for not much money at all now.
    #16
  17. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    Ive always wanted an F5..... ever since I started shooting. I have a drawer full of old 35mm cameras as well, including the Yashica rangefinder my dad shot with in Vietnam that needs some work.
    Also a nearly new N80 that I bought immediately before film cameras fell through the floor.

    :dunno

    one neat camera that i have that i still pull out of the closet every now and then is a Rollei 35. It was a gift to me from a friend after my entire camera collection was stolen....... as far as I know, its the smallest 35mm camera ever produced. Its positively tiny for being a 35mm. Doesnt require batteries or anything, just load and go! Ive taken it on bike trips because it fits so easy into my tank bag

    [​IMG]
    #17
  18. Solaros1

    Solaros1 Long timer

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    I had a couple of Rollei 35S cameras that were great for traveling - small and compact but great images. My main film camera that I carried on multiple trips to Europe and was my constant companion until I switched to digital (and autofocus) a few years ago was my Canon F-1. I still keep it loaded with Tri-X and a 35mm lens.

    [​IMG]

    I sold my Hasselblad last year - just hadn't used it and hated to see it sitting around. Like the three Speed Graphics and the Rollieflex I passed them on to students and young professionals who were looking to learn about film and the skills of photography.
    #18
  19. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Rangefinders are totally overlooked. A grail camera for me.

    [​IMG]
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  20. Norhasken

    Norhasken Tryin' to find my way

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    If you do pick up a Hasselblad, make sure that the light traps on the magazines are good.

    Don't ask me how I know. :lol3
    #20