First Aid Kits

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by eap, Jul 29, 2002.

  1. eap

    eap El Adventurero Solitario

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    :uriel scuse me, is this the safety forum?
    Why yes, it is the Safety Forum, we just don't call it that.
    It is? Well then I have a qwestion, it's kinda related to safety. Kin I ask a qwestion?
    Why yes you may ask any question - as long as it is Safety Related or otherwise.

    WHO CARRIES A FIRST AID KIT AND WHAT'S IN IT!

    Thank you. :uriel :wave
    #1
  2. Steverino

    Steverino Arrogant Horse's Ass #1

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    I do Contents:

    5 creavats (triangular cloth bandages used from slinging to applying dressings to wounds)

    10 4" gauze pads

    10 2" gauze pads

    Abdominal dressing

    Set of oral airways

    pocket mask (also carry a microshield)

    misc. bandaids of various sizes

    stiff wire mesh for splinting

    flashlight

    butterfly bandages

    4" cling wrap

    2" cling wrap

    Antispetic wipes

    20' lenght of 1" nylon webbing (just good to have in case of extrications)

    Latex gloves

    Heavy duty scissors

    Pen/paper

    roll of 2" tape

    Roll of 1" tape

    Severall other things I have deemed useful over the years, but I cannot remember what they are now. I keep evertything in a Zip Lock bag that is always with me when I ride.
    #2
  3. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    Ah so. Good question sire.

    I too would like to know of good kits. I saw RW has some. any others? Any specific to offroad riding? SUpplements?
    #3
  4. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    And all that junk is just junk if you don't know how to use it. Or is it better to have it incase someone else knows how to use it.

    Seems the best one would be one that has all that good stuff in a case that is made for the bike. one that disappears on the bike and you forget about it til it is needed.

    The goose has a nice set of toolboxes one will take a med kit real easy. The VTR has space in the tailsection (query: likelihood of the kit getting launched/damaged in a wreck?) but the DR is seriously lacking in a spot for a case.
    #4
  5. Scary Mc

    Scary Mc hellgrammite

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    I generally do. I've never used it on myself. I have used it on several HD and Honda riders that saw fit to leave the house wearing t-shirts and flip-flops. Kinda pisses me off 'cause they never offer any money for all the expensive shit I use on them!!!

    I use the kits from Adventure Medical Kits . I carry the Fundamentals kit in my saddlebags. The site lists the extensive contents.

    Yes, I know how to use it. I took an EMT course two years ago and had to drop it two weeks before the final... big bummer!

    -Scary
    #5
  6. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    And how about separate kits for each bike? or one that is compact enough for each?

    and finally...separate the emergency kit from the comfort kit (aspirin/allergy meds/bangaids for minor cuts)
    #6
  7. fish

    fish Banned

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    Is this the safety forum? Okay...I'll try to be nice and keep all humor out of it. Safety is far too serious of a subject to apply humor to it. Wouldn't want any humorless cretinous noobies reporting my posts here, now would we?



    Ed, I keep two first aid kits on my bike. One is a Sawyer first aid kit for hunters, which includes everything from bandaids to alcohol wipes, aspirin, antacid and tweezers.
    [​IMG]

    I also carry the BMW first aid kit, which has a lot of gauze, medium sized trauma pads/sponges, and a survival blanket, but none of the medicines or little bandaids of the Sawyer kit...there's no overlap.
    [​IMG]

    I also pack a pair of latex gloves just in case.

    HTH.
    #7
  8. PhilSpace

    PhilSpace The Gov Administrator

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    We carry a kit from REI that sounds similar to what Steve carries - Adventure Medical Fundamentals First Aid Kit

    It has extra room for some special stuff that we have to carry for ourselves and packs up pretty well. So far we haven't had to use it for anything more than simple shit.
    #8
  9. Steverino

    Steverino Arrogant Horse's Ass #1

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    I did not list the stuff for the minor day to day shit. I don;t carry it. If you want it, you need to carry it. The only other thing I carry is motrin for my knees and more recently for the damn teeth!

    I have at my disposal all the medical stuff I need. The only thing I thought would be of value in the kits listed above is the blanket for keeping the patient warm. I need to add one of those.
    #9
  10. eap

    eap El Adventurero Solitario

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    Yeah I like this concept of two kits - like Choop mentioned too - two kits, sort of a comfort kit with the sqeeze tube stuff, aspirin maybe even inlcude your Technu for poison ivy and insect repellent....

    And the second kit like your BMW kit or Steve's list for the actual Responder Scenario:

    So far all I've carried is
    a 'space blanket',
    a pocket CPR mask like
    [​IMG]
    (~$7) from CPR-Equipment
    and a pair of disposalbe latex gloves (which also work for oil changes, tech session wrenching or weather protection).

    I'm 40 hour certified as a 1st responder but it scares the shit out of me just thinkin about a life or death scenario....
    #10
  11. Steverino

    Steverino Arrogant Horse's Ass #1

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    The comfort kit sounds like an excellent idea. I never carry that kind of stuff in my real pack because I never need it. Except for Glucogen, the sugar paste to treat diabetics with. I cannot tell you how many times I have had to clean that sticky crap out of my pack. I have had to use it about three times also. Good to have some kind of sugar available in the event of a seizure.
    #11
  12. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    What about making a medical kit "locker" on the bike? I worry about pouches getting lost in a wreck, crushed in packing, etc.
    #12
  13. Red Bull

    Red Bull Been here awhile

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    Well, you should carry something. I'm a Red Cross Disaster Team Leader and also an EMT. Only a few weeks agao (49r Rally) the well accomplished leader did a head-on with another dirt rider, boken colerboan etc. Another EMT (and BIG DOG rider) was there with his whole (fire rescue) kit. My little kit did not have the soft splint not to mention all the other items I noticed he (allways) carries. It's BIG, (tackel box size) but after this last experiance (and two weeks several other 1st responder to BAD head-on car accidents, ) I'm going to bump-up the contents of the equipment. So I get rid of some unnecessary stuff... and hopefully I will never use it. However, It I suspect I will, and I will most likely be the one needing it! Yikes!

    It does not take much for shock to set in and it's a real danger, (right up there with hypothurmia) for any rider taking a tumble. Here in the Bay area, "Doc Wong" teachs both street and dirt riding clinics and has recently added motorcycle first aid. He is a leader in many ways on accident prevention.

    I have not read the book, "blood, sweat and Gears" but I hear it's a motorcycle specific first aid book. Has anyone else read it?
    #13
  14. Red Bull

    Red Bull Been here awhile

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    I have a strapped a small (very visable) kit right on the rear seat grab rail (when not carring luggage.) Use "flat" (ROK" straps), NEVER comes off! When I carry panniers, the first aid is allways on top. (in a marked case) Also I have a sticker on my helmet with medical info, and details on my med kit. My tank bag also has one of the free "cyclegadget" id med cards too, (never enough when needed.) I'd recommend people look into the whitehorse press helmet Med id and the free med id from www.cyclegadgets.com
    #14
  15. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    One thing I have noticed...

    most of these first aid kits I have been looking at are either "First response" type kits well over 100 bucks, bulky and have an overabundance of stuff for dealing with burns, but not as much for broken things. On one site it was up to the "portable hospital" before I saw a a multi trauma dressiong (acres of rash kinda deal)

    The other option was the smaller kits that seemed to be mostly for finger booboos and splinters. W@hich I would consider for the scondary comfort pack rather than first aid.

    And very few had a reflective blanket inthem.

    Seems like this isn't a very well addressed area. and it almost seems like you have to buy a good case with a basic kit and add stuff specific to motorcycle trauma.

    And a bag strapped on the luggage rack seems to be a make do thang.

    So what I envision is a good setup:

    First your medicine chest. that has the everyday boo boo stuff. bang aids, aspirin, neosporin, bee sting goo, glucose tabs if your diabetic...all that stuff you keep in the medicine chest at home. but smaller quantity. you use this stuff often and it needs to be pretty handy. able to handle any discomfort not needing immediate professional help. and even then with deal with a cut needing some stiches or a hot header pipe burn.

    Second, the trauma kit. this is for the bad stuff. the crash that ends up with you or your buddy wrapped around a tree with broken ribs, a branch through the leg and badly rashed shoulder. Able to keep the biffer alive, warm and could be medevaced or gotten to a hospital. this sucker is stocked, attached to the bike and forgotten about. I was thinkign a form fitting fiberglass case under the seat...but imagine the bike is mashed into a ditch and the bike is resting on the seat and you have a busted wrist? no good. so it can't be too inaccessible. but it can't be in the way of normal use. Maybe a fiber glass box under the rear fender? or a tube (map case like) that goes cross frame that can be opened at either end. (chances are one side or the other will be accessible in any crash)
    #15
  16. Rubber Cow

    Rubber Cow GS Dork

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    I carry a kit on each bike and I took EMT courses at my local community college to know how to use the gear and to make certain that I wouldn't get my ass sued in the event that I did use it.
    You can put together a simple (less expensive) kit at REI. The specialty stuff can be had at your local emergency supply shop or from a catalog shop like Gall's Inc.
    http://www.galls.com
    I carry most everything that has been mentioned but you should definitely carry:

    -latex or nitrile gloves
    -cpr mask
    -Leatherman tool
    -large trauma dressing
    -several rolls of gauze
    -piece of nylon webbing to use as a tourniquet
    -sammy splint
    -waterproof tape
    -waterless hand cleaner or antibacterial/antiviral wipes
    -matches

    I also carry some meds:
    -2 vicodin (enough to get me home even with broken bones)
    -Benadryl for insect stings.
    -Occuhist or Visine AC
    -Claritin Readytabs for allergies
    -Advil or Aleve for muscle aches and injuries
    -Excedrin for headaches
    -An Epi-stick for friends with bee sting allergies.

    What I've mentioned is a MINIMUM kit. I also pack airways, butterfly bandages, Band-Aids, betadine/iodine soap concentrate.

    The R100GSPD has a great storage compartment in the fuel tank. On the Adventure I carry all of my med gear in a small red stuff sack in the left saddlebag. If I'm off-road w/o the bags, I put the minimal kit in a Mountainsmith fanny pack with shoulder straps. I am looking at the Wolfman tool pouch for a med kit as well.
    It's really important that you learn how to use this stuff correctly and expeditiously. Most of these items are easy enough to use but some can cause more harm that good if used incorrectly or at the expense of patient stabilization.
    In the Bay Area UCSF and Stanford offer wilderness first-responder and first aid courses through the student activities centers. Cal Adventures at UCSF/UCB usually has them every six months and the emergency gear vendors usually attend to sell their wares.
    Hope this helps,
    Cheers,
    Jorge
    #16
  17. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    The trainig is part of what I lack. Doesn't do a damned bit of good to have the fancy equipment if you don't know what the hell you are doing.

    I'm looking in on the community college stuff now. REI might have some links to classes as well.



    #17
  18. Rad

    Rad Just me

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    Ditto

    I carry a small back packing first aid kit with me when I travel. It is the same one I take kayaking and cross country sking. I don't carry one on my daily commute to work but I always keep latex gloves in my tank bag.
    #18
  19. Red Bull

    Red Bull Been here awhile

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    Beeing a "Red Cross" DAT team leader, I'd also recommend you check with your local chapter, they have three levels of first aid available, and during my EMT tranining, several park rangers were getting the same tranining. To really make the most of the class room (and get an EMT certification), you will then have to invest several months onboard an ambulance. I have had a lot of hands-on experiance that does make a difference. But it all starts with some action... it's not enough to say, "I want to do it", pick up the phone (now) and enroll. Serriously, we are a high risk group and it's very likely that you will use some level of first aid, and as mentioned earlier, law-suite avoidance.

    BTW- refeshers cources are only a few days, and also need to be done annualy.
    #19
  20. Chopperman

    Chopperman I am dead

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    Hmph I must be stoopid. I'm only seeing CPR courses at my community colleges. no first aid/trauma/survival

    BTW this kit seesm to cover about 90% of the gear? Looks like adding some maxipads, an emergency blanket and a penlight and it would be a goer.
    #20