First Aid Kits

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by eap, Jul 29, 2002.

  1. Mr_Snips

    Mr_Snips Husky BRAAAAAAAAP!

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    Not sure why they still sell it but quick clot is nasty. I mean better than death but not much. If you can find combat gauze its much better, hurts less, and the surgical removal is much much easier
  2. Downs

    Downs KK6RBI

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    I got rid of my QC stuff and went to Celox gauze for those reasons.


    Sent from my iPhone
  3. BeMeUp

    BeMeUp neverlost

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    In addition to the basics previously mentioned . I also carry a small tube of super glue......."caution bonds skin instantly":wink: works great to close an open gash.
  4. mrxinpa

    mrxinpa Just Get Out and Ride !!!

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    Two additional things I carry that most everyone has left out. A kotex pad was mentioned but I also carry two tampons instead. I also take a wooden tongue depressor and wrap about an inch or to thick band of duck tape around the stick.

    Once we Came across a massive puncture wound out on the trail. Packed the wound with gauze. Wouldn't stop bleeding. Wrapped with gauze & med tape but it kept bleeding thru. We shoved a tampon partially in the hole, & few rapped everything with the bloody gauze and what clean stuff we had left. We couldn't sit in the woods holding pressure on, it would take medical personal hours to reach us since we where 40 miles from nowhere. A tight wrap with duck tape over all the gauze & his riding shirt & the three of us rode out. Got him to the ER. They cut the tape off and The bleeding had completely stopped, wound looked just as it did on the scene, emergency med staff was impress with our improv of supplies in the woods to get this gentlemen the med attention he needed. They were convinced had we not taken those steps to control his bleeding more than likely he would have bled out without our intervention!

    So can U carry a small pack while riding singletrack Yes & I always do. To me the kits just as important as riding Along with my tools.

    I also never leave home without my SPOT personal locator. We were really close to hitting the 911 panic button but the injured rider was adamant that after our dressing of his wound it was not a life threatening injury & wanted to take himself to the hospital. Instead We drove him & his vehicle and all went together.
  5. Mr_Snips

    Mr_Snips Husky BRAAAAAAAAP!

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    Yup...you'd be amazed what you can do with gauze and pressure. Puncture wounds can always be tricky...luckily since i'm a Marine i've gotten alot of medical training in trauma assessment and on the scene treatment. Once you've fixed up a pig thats been shot with a 12 ga or your buddy with no leg (not everything is fun and happy) than you realize just how little you need to save someones life. Especially when you have some basic training in the subject matter and the right tool for the job.



    ***
    On the tampon note i've always heard rumors but never seen it done. glad to see that it does work to some degree. I was always taught they dont have enough outward pressure to really stop the bleeding.


    I'll include a link to the combat gauze. I've used it in training and in an actual oh shit scenario. I wasnt real impressed on the pig but on the gunshot wound one of my Marines had it worked stupid well. I would assume its a bit pricey but you just pack it in the hole and its going to stop bleeding. I promise you that much. To give you an idea a friend of mine was shot through the quad (missed the femoral) and we stuffed it with the stuff and bleeding stopped without applying external pressure. So for a puncture wound or similar where that person is bleeding bad and you cant apply direct pressure to the area (since its a puncture you can only apply pressure on the surface) than this stuff rocks.

    http://www.z-medica.com/healthcare/Products/QuikClot-Combat-Gauze.aspx
  6. fldigger

    fldigger Adventurer

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    My first aid kit is a two shots of Bombay Saphire and a packet of Trojans. Saved my life on several (well, at least one) occasions
  7. DomEOD

    DomEOD 'murica

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    I carry this.

    CAT tourniquet, gauze, Israeli bandage, needle decompression thingy, nasal pharangeal thingy and some more stuff. I might suck at the names but I know how to and have used the things a number of times on deployment. Worked well there so it should work on the asphalt, right?

    I keep it in my pack on rides. The pouch is actually a "leg rig" so you can get an idea of the size.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 4
  8. purplepeopleeater

    purplepeopleeater The Official VW Nut

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    where'd ya get that?
  9. DomEOD

    DomEOD 'murica

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    The Army. They just give shit out sometimes :p
  10. Jnich77

    Jnich77 Been here awhile

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    Other than the gauze and Israeli, you can chunk the rest of that stuff. Replace with eye drops, more gauze, Motrin, band-aids, and 2" tape. The chances of you having to do a NCD or NPA is so rare that its a waste of space to even carry them. The MOI for motorcycle injuries are vastly different than those during a deployment.

    And for the record, you can get in a shit ton of trouble for doing a NCD in the civilian world if you are not a EMT-P. More often than not a NCD does more harm than good when done by a non-medical professional.


    ~ Doc
  11. Skred

    Skred Adventurer

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    Really, get some training so you know how to perform first aid.

    If you have time, get certified as an Emergency Medical Responder. If I could, I would require Emergency Medical Responder certification for high school graduation. Well worth the time and money. It teaches techniques and procedures. Importantly, it teaches you how to talk the talk.

    I have treated few life-threatening conditions in 30 years of being a first responder/EMR including an allergic reaction to a bee sting, a Soldier who fell out of a 7-ton truck onto his head, several cases of pneumonia and a heart attack. Not a lot, but it counted for somebody.

    The standards of care are different for military and civilian worlds and from state to state. While the Good Samaritan Laws will protect you, knowing what you can and cannot do can keep you out of court. What I could do as a Combat Lifesaver is called assault in California. Rehearsal helps - A LOT. I have a First Aid kit for treating the small number of injuries that come my way but nothing beats proper training training.

    The American Red Cross has some classes and the FEMA website for online training has some good courses that will help, especially when calling for assistance and passing information. Use of a common lexicon and plain English is one of the things that came out for the response to 9-11. The FEMA courses will teach you some of that.

    Supplies are pretty basic. 4x4's and Kerlix, PPE, tape, 4" and 6" ACE bandages, blood pressure cuff and stethoscope, TQ's and some other other stuff I learned to pack from experience. Also a urinal. A patient may be badly hurt, but soiling themselves can be even more upsetting than being hurt. Setting up wound kits in baggies helped a lot. I labeled them with sharpies so that if I told someone to "Get the wound packet," they would know what to hand me. KISS. The IFAK on my motorcycle is about the size of a canteen. I need to get a new NPA NCD kit in case I need one for myself.


    Your communications plan is almost more important than your kit or training.

    As a First Responder/EMR being able to contact help is critical. It doesn't take much to get the whole world to show up to help. Do some telephone book research and make a few phone calls to the PD to make sure you have your area programmed into your plan. Find out if they use a certain map and keep one handy. Our county uses the Thomson Guide. Most public service departments do.

    As an example, I ordered a medevac helicopter, three ambulances and every fire truck in town with the phrase " ... you might need a helicopter, it's a big wreck." when reporting on an accident I witnessed.


    Books that help:

    "Ditch Medicine" available online at SCRIBD.com

    Any certified EMR textbook that you would use in a class published in the last five years. Look up the course catalog at your local college to see what is being schooled in your area. You'll find them at the library, too.

    Make a checklist - cuz at when shit happens @ 0316 on day 17 of a 21 day/12 hours a day shift, your brain doesn't work. It doesn't have to be fancy. I wrote mine on a stack of spiral bound flashcards.

    FM 21-11, First Aid for Soldiers

    The Boy Scout merit badge for First Aid book ( Really. The basics of first aid I learned in 1974 still apply )


    The American Red Cross First Aid Handbook
  12. DirtMedic

    DirtMedic Intrepid Explorer

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    Excellent lists for first aid kits, and an excellent discussion taking place here. The fact that this is not discussed more is a shame. Many folks just want to bury their head in the sand when it comes to the idea that bad things can happen.

    I was asked by a BMW club to give a presentation on the topic of what to do after an accident. I wrote an article to supplement the presentation. The short version was passed out at that presentation and the long version was posted to their website. Those articles are probably appropriate for this discussion, but too long to place as a post.

    Here is a link to the short version:
    http://dirtmedic.wordpress.com/2013/06/01/after-the-accident-short-version/

    And a link to the longer, more detailed version
    http://dirtmedic.wordpress.com/2013/05/31/after-the-accident/

    To the pros on this thread, critique through the comment section on the blog would be appreciated as I will probably be using this article for other presentations.
  13. ThumpnRed

    ThumpnRed Pig Wrangler

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    What he said. Put the needle down and step away:eek1