First Post: Looking at a Scooter....

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by MN_Disco1, May 10, 2011.

  1. MN_Disco1

    MN_Disco1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    10
    Well I just signed up after reading a lot on scooters. It seems like this website has a lot of experience to draw from....

    So as my name implies I do dig the the idea of having a little adventure. My first adventure rig is a 94 Discovery. Now I am thinking about two wheels and something else to tinker with.

    I guess i am looking for information on a scooter as a good way to learn to ride. I have never ridden a scooter or a motorcycle; i guess i did not have an opportunity.

    I have been looking at a Ruckus. Safety is the utmost importance so i have been looking at motorbike training before i start.

    I would appreciate any pointers on helmets, jackets, classes, the whole deal...

    Thanks
    #1
  2. Sly-one

    Sly-one Deskbound Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    SW Florida
    :clap :clap You have come to the right place. Welcome to Adventure Land. Or is it Asylum Land? :rofl
    You have made a wise decision in saying you want to take a riding course. Around here, you will see that the vast majority of us are very safety minded. Taking that course will not only get you introduced to the world of 2 wheels, but it will open your eyes to some of what it takes to stay in one piece.
    I don't have a Ruckus, but I've heard nothing but good things about them. Just be forewarned, once you get used to zipping around on a Ruckus, you're gonna want to raise a ruckus on to something bigger, to go on even bigger and farther adventures. :ricky
    When it comes time to move up, the inmates here will steer you in the right direction. Just don't be surprised if it happens to be a million different directions, because everyone has their own favorites. Don't say I didn't warn ya.:wink:
    As for the motorcycle vs scooter debate, that will be up to you. Lots of folks have both, with each having their own specialty. Many (many) years ago, I learned to ride on a Harley Sprint, but the frirst one that I owned was a Vespa 125. It had a metal body, a twist-grip 3-speed, it was a tank and it would out-run a Honda 50. That, plus it would go anywhere a Honda 50 would go and then some, much to the chagrin of my friends with the H-50s. :ken
    Since then, I've owned only motorcycles, but guess what? The older I get, the harder it is to sling a leg over a tall bike, and I'm thinking of going back to my roots. Maybe not a Vespa again, but back to something with floorboards and a step-through. It's all a personal decision that only YOU can make for yourself. Except for making high speed runs at the Salt Flats, there's not too much that a bike can do that a scooter can't do just as well from short trips to the store (actually does this better) to touring.
    But, just like the fact that one person's dream is a Ruckus and someone else wants nothing less than a full dressed hog, it's all up to you (and your pocketbook).
    Whatever you decide to get, have fun and be safe!
    #2
  3. MN_Disco1

    MN_Disco1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    10
    I have been going back and forth between a small dual sport and a ruckus. I have actually been thinking a scooter based on the following:

    - i will probably just ride around town after work and on the weekends.
    - a scooter would not take up as much space as a bike. I have a super small two car full of two cars and tools.
    - price...I guess I don't want to spend every penny on the hobby.
    - bottom line, i am looking for something to wrench on and go on short rides
    #3
  4. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,307
    Location:
    BC
    rukus is good scooter. The big rusus is even better is you can find one. It also depends on what your wants for CC . I love the honda helix. Others like the elite 80 to 250. The rukus is great bike because so many people are making after market parts for them. Lots of hop ups to add on to them. You can ride off road on one if you ve got the right type of scooter tire. People make there own little sidecars for them to haul a dog around town etc. To find what you want I would look up one of the craglist search engines like search tempest .
    The 4best online places for stuff are
    ironpony.com
    http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com and http://www.motorcyclecloseouts.com/
    http://www.motorcyclegear.com/
    They all offering last years or the year before gear at deep discounts. Name brands helmets 30 bucks up. Coats and pants starting at 40 bucks for name brands not china crap. As one guys has said It's great you first are going to get training before hitting the road so to speak. Far to many still don't do that.
    #4
  5. btcn

    btcn Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,880
    Location:
    Morgan Hill CA
    Welcome to ADV rider! You've come to the right place!

    As for the scooter, its ALL about what your wants and needs are. If you plan on doing most of your riding at a leisurely 30-35 MPH around town, the Ruckus will be a great scooter for you. Looks cool and has decent off road abilities.

    If you want to do around town and longer distance backroad cruising take a look at the 125 cc class scoots. The Kymco Agility 125 is a great scooter. Cheaper than the Honda Ruckus at just $1,799 but much more powerful. It'll cruise real nice at 45-50 MPH and top out at about 60 MPH. Theres lots of 125 cc scoots.

    If your riding will include around town, backroad cruising, some 2 lane 55 MPH highways and short jaunts on the interstate, a 150-250 cc scoot will do it great. 150 cc scoots will get you to about 55 MPH for cheap models and 65-70 MPH for higher end liquid cooled models. A typical 250 cc scooter will get you to 75 MPH and a higher end model about 80+ MPH.

    You also mention you want wrenching? Check out a used 85-87 Honda Elite 150 on Craigslist. They initially require a bit of work, but once you get all the old parts replaced they go for 100K+ trouble free miles with proper maintenance, give you a 65+ MPH top speed, and get 80-100 MPG and sell for about $600-$1,100 depending on condition



    Theres lots of scoots out there. Just find which fits your needs best.

    BTW smart choice on taking the safety course. Safety is very important on 2 wheels, as most of the time you get no second chance
    #5
  6. Sly-one

    Sly-one Deskbound Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    SW Florida
    What he said!!!
    #6
  7. lowbuckrider

    lowbuckrider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Long Beach, Ca.
    #7
  8. ronnath

    ronnath Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,447
    Location:
    iowa
    True dat.

    It's addicting:

    [​IMG]
    #8
  9. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,907
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    Welcome to the Asylum. You've come to the right place. I would recomend taking the MSF riding course as a good way to get started. For info on riding gear, check out this thread: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=653311

    If you haven't already, check out the Day trippin and ride reports section of this forum, lots of great pics and stories there, even a few done on scooters. If those sections don't get you drooling over the prospect of riding, nothing will.

    As for what to get, there are plenty of choices out there. I have a long background riding motorcycles, only recently getting my first scooter. For riding around town and practicality, you can't beat a scooter.
    #9
  10. Sly-one

    Sly-one Deskbound Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Ronnath proves my point very well. :lol3
    #10
  11. PinkSteel

    PinkSteel Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    205
    Location:
    Fairfield County, CT
    I took the MSF course back in the 80's, and used it to teach my kids and wife to ride. My wife is scheduled to take the real course in July.

    Yes, it is that important.

    If I was a starting to ride, I'd consider any of the better 125's or 150's scooters - Vespa/Piaggio/Honda/Kymco/Etc. - or a 200-250 motorcycle, like the Yamaha TW200, a cool bike, Ninja 250, etc.

    Really, if you stay in the 125/200 range, in either a scooter or small motorcycle, you'll have plenty of speed/power, a light weight bike that's easier to learn and practice on, and something you can live with for a few years, if you want. A later model used bike would be fine for a starter ride. Find the models you'd consider, and use Ebay, Craigslist, or the search sites for used scooters/bikes.

    Once you've ridden for a year or two, you'll be ready for the Blur 220...
    #11
  12. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,312
    Location:
    WNC SWFL
    50cc is just too small. Get at least a 150cc so you will keep it for a while.
    #12
  13. Sly-one

    Sly-one Deskbound Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Yah, I forgot to add the TW200. It's a very fun bike with a lower seat height that you can take almost anywhere. It's not a touring bike, although some epic rides have been made on them, including one I read about from Cali to Alaska. You'll find other RRs (ride reports) on this forum as well if you use the search feature.
    #13
  14. Tacoma

    Tacoma Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Oddometer:
    233
    Don't buy one for the wrong reasons, a motorcycle or a scooter isn't for everybody, the number one reason to want to own one is the love and passion to ride, you need that feeling when your out working on a nice sunny day and you see a motorcycle ride past, and you say to yourself "I wish that was me out riding instead of being stuck here working", or if you see a bike at a gas station and you just stand there and stare at it and dream about owing one.
    Some people the excitemnt wears off after owning one, some people own a bike just to show it off, or to impress others, don't buy it for those reasons, buy it for you, to impress you.
    Thats what I tell everybody, when someone asks me why did I buy my scooter for, I tell them "To impress me,, not you"
    Good Luck, I hope you get one cause I think you'll love it!

    btw: a motorcycle or scooter is a great stress reliever, when your out on the open road your problems seem to fade away, you're in the zone, just you and the wind rushing your face, the freedom, the smell of the air, the things you see that you missed seeing when you traveled that same route in a car, you're one with nature, the rush or speed knowing your in control, you have a smile on your face, its a passion, its better than sex!
    #14
  15. Sly-one

    Sly-one Deskbound Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    SW Florida
    It will most definitely relieve stress and put a smile on your face. :clap

    Tacoma, let's not get carried away there, dude!
    #15
  16. LarryRickenbacker

    LarryRickenbacker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    313
    Location:
    NW La. (USA)
    Howdy,

    MN Disco1: I was in your shoes 4 years ago. I'd never ridden a motorbike before and I was fortysomething. I settled on a 125cc scooter, which brought some excitement and fun to errand-running and commuting.
    I have a Honda Sh150i now and enjoy re-fueling! I tend to use my scoot as more of a M-F commuter/errand bike, but we're going to get along just fine. :clap
    #16
  17. THE_SHRUB

    THE_SHRUB Potted plant

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    105
    If your looking into your first scooter, I would suggest looking at a good 125-150cc scoot. Its good for getting a feel for everything from backroad riding, to urban downtown traffic. Not too big, not too small. Just remember that it IS highway legal, but not recommended AT ALL!!

    I just started riding, and I'm on a 1985 Honda elite 150 and I find it suits my needs / riding style very well. If your in the market for a used scoot to start off with , the elite 150 is a good place to start looking. And If your looking for a new model, good luck narrowing your options down, because theres a LARGE variety available these days. :rofl
    #17
  18. MN_Disco1

    MN_Disco1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    10
    I appreciate the comments, especially about motives for riding. I guess I can remember wanting a motorcycle from the time I could pick out my bigwheel as a kid. I was a bigwheel made to look like a Kawasaki dirtbike. My parents HATE motorcycles so I guess I did not have one...

    31 years later... I think I would like to learn something new. It seems there is a great opportunity for fun /enjoyment and risk. However, it does seem like there are alot of ways to mitigate the risks. It seems most riders do not take the steps to reduce risks...
    #18
  19. SpannerX

    SpannerX Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    87
    Listen, we've all heard your impressions of your scoot, etc, and you are crapping up the forum, cut it the hell out! You sound like a broken record, and a fair amount of us are probably sick of it. It's too bad you seem to have issues in your area with riders and locals, that sucks, but leave it at the door to what ever room you have your computer in, jeeze. You either have to switch your ride, or you are a troll, in which case, good job in getting me to bite.

    Content: As long as you don't buy a mainland China built scoot from an off brand (Some major brands do have their lower end stuff built on the mainland, and they are okay, but not as good as the stuff from Taiwan,) you'll be fine. 125-150 CCs is a good range, Elite 150s are damn near bullet proof, and usually decently priced. I'm thinking about an Elite 250 that is near (and by near I mean within 400 Km) from me for around $800 Cnd. Might need some carb cleaning, but all the plastic is there.
    #19
  20. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,907
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    You are exactly correct. Riding is a lot safer if you do it correctly and mitigate the risks. First, and probably most importantly, learn how to ride. After you learn the basics, keep learning and improving. Try to become an excellent rider, not just one who is "good enough"

    Second, use some common sense. No riding while drunk, riding 100 through a school zone or other stupid stuff. Do these things and you may never have an accident. There are a few people out there like hexnut who have been riding a long time with no crashes.

    Third, don't assume you will be one of those who never crashes. Get some decent riding gear. I have seen a lot of crashes and the vast majority of the time, those who crashed while properly dressed walked away.

    Last. Go out, get a scooter and enjoy the ride.:ricky
    #20