First Trip on 2 Wheels. 10,000 miles. 21 years old.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by EvanADV, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    Excellent report so far:thumb

    I wish I had had the guts to do something like this when I was 21.

    Great Job on the ride report. Sharing your thoughts and feelings in addition to pictures and a description of the ride are what turn an ordinary ride report into a great one. I thought you did a particularly good job describing the day you experienced the low point of your trip and then the lady at the diner.

    I'm looking forward reading the rest of this report. Thanks for posting this.
  2. Chris-KH2PM

    Chris-KH2PM Let the Good Times Roll!

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    Looking forward to updates! Thanks for sharing, Evan!
  3. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

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    I think your engine is jinxing your trip, check out the face. :eek1

    [​IMG]
  4. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    Thanks guys. More to come soon. Hoping to post some today.

    For the life of me I can't figure out what you're talking about? :huh
  5. TheRoss

    TheRoss IBA# 522

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    Evan,

    Good job keeping things civil with Drew. I thought his observations were well stated, whether I agree with them or not, but they could have become a real negative on a great thread. Your reply was a wise one.

    Great ride report. It's nice to take a break from all the GS Round the World far flung ride reports.... reports that are great to read but for me personaly not doable.... and to read about your adventures and observations right here. Memories have come back to me of places I have been, and you have given me many ideas of places I would like to go. Very good photography too!

    Keep up the good work!
  6. dmaxmike

    dmaxmike former quadtard.

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    You’re what I like to call “good people” thanks for sharing your story. And also congrats on getting married and having the sense to marry a beautiful girl who loves cars enough to include them in her wedding pictures. And she apparently loves moto’s and you enough to let you go for a 10,000 mile joy ride so I would say she is a keeper! I am of the bigger persuasion as well but your luckier then me as I am also short. You know how hard it is to find 42-28 riding pants?!

    IN for the rest!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
  7. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    To all of you following along, I apologize for the delay. The guys over at the Charlotte, NC ADV pizza meet were giving me a hard time last night about leaving everyone hanging. I typed up 3/4 of this post two days ago in "Notepad" at work, but forgot to save. My battery apparently died overnight in my bag and all my writing had vanished on reboot. Hope you enjoy my second attempt.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I woke up at the Parkway Inn the morning after my day at Yellowstone and got my bike packed back up. I was getting pretty good at loading all my crap on there at that point.

    I only had two objectives for the day:

    First - get a photo of myself in front of the antler archees. I'd found out from my tour guide the day prior that they were located in the town square. My mom had told me that her dad had a photo of himself there from one of his annual "out west" hunting trips. He passed away when I was in middle school, just when I was starting to get close to him. I'd been to visit him in TN to turkey and deer hunt every season for a few years before he died. He gave me hell all the time and was quite an hornary old man, but he always looked forward to hunting with me, according to my mom. I'd always dreamed of going "out west" with him to hunt elk. I say "out west" because until this trip it seemed like a mythical place. Now I was there, all on my own. I couldn't help but think he'd be proud. Having a photo to compare to his from decades prior would be really cool.

    Second - get to Missoula, MT where I had a couch reserved for the night about 400 miles away.


    So, after loading up I made my way toward the middle of town to seek out those antler arches.

    After turning onto a road I had to dodge a big pile of horse manure. I assumed maybe people rode horses in town? I didn't give it much thought until I found myself following 3 or 4 cowboys on horseback a few yards up the road. Then, a little further up the road, I realized there were hundreds of people lining both sides of the street. What was going on?

    It hadn't even crossed my mind that it was the 4th of July. After a few days on the road you lose track of such unimportant things, like what day it is. Sure enough, I had entered the Independence Day parade through the town square of Jackson, WY, situated conveniently between two groups of cowboys. My timing was impeccable.

    I grinned and chuckled at my situation. As I slowly moved through the crowd I just waved and pretended I was supposed to be there. I'm sure a few hundred people have pictures of me from that day as I made my way through the parade.

    I found a place to pull off and park in front of a saloon, so I did. The antler arches were just across the street, so I made my way over to them and asked a nice looking couple to snap a photo of me.

    [​IMG]

    It turned out nice enough but the crowd of people surrounding me didn't appeal to me. Thankfully, I'd entered the parade near the end, so I waited for the crowd to die down a bit and got another photo op. Much better.

    [​IMG]

    What I had anticipated to take only a few minutes ended up taking over an hour, but it made for a very interesting experience I wouldn't have traded for anything. That's one of those stories I just wouldn't even be able to make up. I'm working on tracking down the photo of my pa paw for comparison, will post up later.

    I got back on the bike and made my way out of Jackson. I'd finally gotten used to how the bike handled loaded down after all those miles, and I remember really enjoying the winding road out of Jackson on the Teton Pass Highway (WY-22). I wished i'd come in to Jackson in the daylight so I could have enjoyed that ride a little more, rather than being scared out of my mind as I was. Next time.

    I crossed into Idaho and into the beautiful green foothills and farmland on ID-33 westward and then onto I-15 north. I couldn't help but feel relaxed surrounded by this scenery, not to mention that my long 600+ mile days were over and I could now take my time and enjoy getting from stop to stop at a more leisurely pace.

    I remember thinking that everyone should do this. Everybody should come "out west" and see this beautiful place. And that they shouldn't fly, but drive or ride. Something about a thousand miles of flat corn fields leading up to it all made it that much more amazing. So many of my friends and familly, like me, hadn't ventured out of the southeast. Most of them, as i've mentioned before, thought I was nuts. This made it all worth it. I was so thankful for the wild idea I'd come up with to come and do this trip. Otherwise, I may have lived my life never having experienced this part of the world that was so close yet so far away.


    Part two of the trip to Missoula soon to come...
  8. tbss1

    tbss1 Adventurer

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    Excellent report. Keep up the good work!
  9. squiffynimrod

    squiffynimrod maximum shrinkage

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    Ok EvanADV, it's been a week and no update.
    I'm in withdrawals.
    Please update.
  10. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    Actually just wrapping up another post! Check back in the next few minutes. :lol3
  11. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    Trip to Missoula: Part 2

    My first gas stop of the day was quite eventful. My fill up rhythym had been every 100-120 miles. By that time my fuel light was blinking, even though I could probably stretch close to 200 miles out of the 5 gallon tank, and I was ready to stand and stretch for a minute or two.

    The blinking fuel light tends to come on around 110 miles, and as I said, I knew I had 5 gallons, but out there in the open west where civilizations were sparse, my mind began to get the best of me.

    I pulled off the interstate at around 120 miles on a tank. The signage reported a single gas station to the right off the ramp, but when I got there I realized the place had been closed and abandoned for quite some time. I decided to explore down the road a bit further, expecting to find a town with gas within a few miles. That's why they had an exit there, surely? I had no cell phone reception, so I couldn't check my maps, but it seemed a reasonable assumption, so I proceeded.

    After 2 or 3 miles, things were looking bleak and I was beginning to doubt my decision. I passed several ranches, but there was not another human within sight. The rolling hills seemed to go on forever. I continued for 10 miles when I decided it was time to turn around before I found myself completely out of gas in the middle of nowhere. On the way back I stopped and cut the bike off to watch 4 or 5 antelope from only a few feet away.

    As I approached the interstate, only a few hundred yards from the on ramp I noticed a man in front of his house. I decided to stop and ask where the closest fill up was. He told me if I would have went a little further, about 2 more miles, I would have found a town with gas in the direction I went exploring. He said the next town was another 15 or 20 miles up the interstate.

    I was concerned I'd be cutting it too close to make it so I asked if he had any gas on hand he'd be willing to sell me. He went into his garage and pulled out a can, poured in a gallon or so, and wouldn't take my $5. I thanked him and went on my way.

    Just as he said, I found a town about 15 miles down the road and filled up.

    I'd say that was about the best outcome possible for a "gas scare" and I made sure to plan ahead for gas from then on.

    I took some video between the Clark Canyon Reservoir and Dillon, WY as I was riding through Montana here:

    <object width="960" height="720"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/iKn-lA-nDUI?hl=en_US&amp;version=3&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/iKn-lA-nDUI?hl=en_US&amp;version=3&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="960" height="720" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

    I made it into Missoula, MT an hour or so before sunset. I spotted a Countour HD Camera bus when I got into town and caught it on camera. Thought that was an interesting sight.

    <object width="960" height="720"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/lQJWLfoU79w?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/lQJWLfoU79w?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="960" height="720" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

    I was staying with a friend of my friends Steve and Kelly from Willits, CA. I mentioned I met Steve and Kelly in Nicaragua in my opening post. Their friend in Missoula, Greg, was actually handicapped and confined to a wheelchair due to health issues, but that didn't stop him from welcoming a weary traveler. I met Greg and we had dinner together his aid had prepared. We talked for a few hours and watched a fireworks show on TV. I enjoyed talking to him about my trip and swapping stories about Steve and Kelly, and eventually I headed to the couch for a good night's sleep.

    Found this short clip of me corssing into Idaho, must have been from earlier that day.

    <object width="960" height="720"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/VlhOf5uNWPo?hl=en_US&amp;version=3&amp;rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/VlhOf5uNWPo?hl=en_US&amp;version=3&amp;rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="960" height="720" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  12. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

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    Can you see the face now? :rofl

    [​IMG]
  13. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    LOL that's a stretch, but maybe I just haven't had enough to drink?
  14. XCRider803

    XCRider803 Loftin' the wheel

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    It's called pareidolia, seeing faces in things like clouds and Bandit motors.:rofl
  15. Katoom119

    Katoom119 Mmmm....Orange Kool-aid

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    Recognized your screen name and my brain finally made the connection to your posts in the Pizza thread. :baldy I hate finals.

    I'm caught up now.

    Going back to your $20 story: It's comforting to know you've got Someone watching over you. Nothing that profound has happened to me but something happened to my dad after my little brother died.

    Good on you for telling your story, your way. It's impressive.
  16. N-Id-Jim

    N-Id-Jim Been here awhile

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    Awesome story telling.. You, sir, are blessed.
  17. blacktruck

    blacktruck Wanderer

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    I'm in. Interesting perspective and looks like a fun trip too.
  18. EvanADV

    EvanADV Oso

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    The following morning I loaded up and headed for Kennewick, Washington. Greg was still asleep and hooked up to his breathing machines, and I was afraid to disturb him, so I left him a note of thanks and quietly made my way out.

    It was a damp day in Montana, not raining, but misty and foggy enough so that the sun couldn't poke through very much. The first few hundred miles was more of the same beautiful country I'd been seeing the last few days. My first gas fill up was at a mountainside truck stop somewhere in west Montana. I made conversation with a few local Harley riders there who noticed I was fully loaded and a long way from home. They were very surprised to hear what I was doing. By this time the surprised reactions I continually received were getting a little bit predictable, but hadn't began to really bother me. I grabbed a late breakfast inside and filled up on fuel, then mounted back up to continue west.

    I passed through Coeur d'Alene, Idaho just as it started to rain. By this time kd learned a lot about rain riding, out of necessity, and was less panicked. I got into my zone, intensely concentrated, making each input to the bike withincreased awareness and intentionality, and as some of you may understand, it's a state of mind all of it's own. After 10 or 15 minutes, the rain started to hurt as I collided with it at highway speed, even through my gloves and jacket. Then I looked down and noticed white pebbles accumulating in the creases of my jacket. No wonder it hurt, it was sleet - not rain.

    Sleet. In July.

    I pressed on, having learned by that tome that most weather was escapable if you just keep rolling. Sure enough within a few minutes it quit and started to dry up.

    The landscape began to change from lush green foothills to desert like and flat over the course of the day, and my soggy clothes dried out as the sun revealed itself again.

    When I imagined Washington state, I pictured pine forests. I saw also none of that and almost all what appeared to resemble desert. Again, a surprise to me. It was now hot and dry instead if cold and wet.

    This was one of the few areas of the trip I figured I'd have to camp or hotel because I didn't have any nearby contacts. I'd been spamming my friends for months through Facebook statuses and had successfully rounded up a spot to stay almost everywhere. Nothing had turned up for this area, though, until a few days prior. A friend I'd met about a year before in Nicaragua, Caitlin, sent me a Facebook message telling me one of her best friends lived in Kennewick and would be happy to host me. I got a name, number, and address, and I was set.

    I got off the highway and made my way through Pasco, which was reminiscent of Central America - almost every sign was in Spanish. I crossed the Columbia River bridge and I was in Kennewick. Just a few turns and I'd arrived.

    It was mid afternoon, probably 3 or 4pm. Murphy was home and greeted me in the driveway. She welcomed me into the house and offered me a much needed glass of ice water. She said everyone was at work but they'd be home soon. Several friends shared the house and lived there together. I gave Murphy the rundown about my trip amd how i'd met Caitlin, and she told me a little about herself. She and several of their friends worked at a local gourmet cheese shop called Cheese Louise. Shortly thereafter, one of her roommates, Krista, arrived. We got dinner ready together and decided to quit waiting and eat around 7pm around dusk. They'd fixed "tri tip", which I remember because that was the first time I'd heard of such a thing and haven't found it again since. It was a grilled cut of beef, similar to what I would call brisket, accompanied by asparagus and potatoes. It was absolutely delicious, and probably one of the first times I'd had rare/medium rare meat. That meal changed how I ordered meat from that point forward - no more well done steaks for this guy ever since.

    As we ate, various room mates and friends began to show up. One, two, three at a time they'd arrive. By 10 o'clock or so there was at least 12 of them in all. They were all young and interesting. One was named Evan and had a beard, just like me, which everyone found very funny. Murphy would introduce me to each of them and tell them where I was from and how I'd ended up there. They all said something to the effect of, "Oh, cool!" but it wasn't the same reaction I usually got. There was a different tone in their responses that led me to believe they understood what I was doing and why. They weren't really shocked, or even impressed. They just seemed to get it. Some smoked, most drank, and they all seemed to enjoy life. These were my kind of people.

    The experience hanging out with those wonderful folks in Kennewick reminded me of one of the things I missed most about being in Nicaragua - living in community. They just hung out and did life together. We didn't really do that back home. Everybody pretty much kept to themselves and lived their lives compartmentalized from one another, only rarely visiting each other. I couldn't really put my finger on what was so different about living in Nicaragua so much until that night in Kennewick. It was community. That night, and feelings of discouragement or homesickness faded as we enjoyed each other's company. They'd revealed more about what life was all about for me than they'd ever know.

    Late that night, after the party died down, somebody directed me to a bed in the basement that I could use. I quickly fell asleep after a great evening of food, drink, and conversation. The west coast awaited me.
  19. Downs

    Downs KK6RBI

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    Good post especially about the community thing. I'm kind of a recluse but like to socialize when camping off the bike on trips. Usually nets ya some good booze from the car campers too :1drink :freaky
  20. moellear

    moellear n00b

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    First off, thanks for doing this thread. You have obviously done the trip of a lifetime but to share it to the rest of us is very exceptional. Thanks Evan. I hope to be able to do something like this with my 30 year old Yamaha since I'm younger than my motorcycle, but was recently hired full-time in the real world :puke1

    Speaking of work, I live & work full-time in Lima. Before working here I never heard of the pork rind factory but being employed at a civil engineering firm we're currently extending the city of Lima's waterline system out to Rudolf Foods and the Westminster area. You remember much about this small itty bitty town?! haha its a small world for me to find a report on someone who stopped in a small area in my neck of the woods..
    Sadly the CEO of Rudolf Foods passed away just a few weeks ago. Is that him in the second picture centered in the picture sitting down with white hair?Here's the news out of Lima newspaper...http://www.limaohio.com/news/article_a54c319c-a6fb-11e2-ba35-001a4bcf6878.html

    I just ate there last week!! :rofl Its a traditional community diner with great burgers. Glad you made the stop here in Ohio and I wish I could've met you. At the time of this trip I was still attending school in southern Ohio. You are a wise man for taking the trip of a lifetime. Thanks again for sharing. I usually don't respond to reports (just read them and ride-along) but yours sorta hits home for me. Ride safe Evan