Fork oil change

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by rossguzzi, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. rossguzzi

    rossguzzi 990 Adv.

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    I want to change my fork oil but need a 'how to' anyone know of where I can find ?
    Cheers
    #1
  2. Vicks

    Vicks gets stuck in sand

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    Right at the top of OC page ...

    here
    #2
  3. tomdubz

    tomdubz getting there

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  4. rossguzzi

    rossguzzi 990 Adv.

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    Thanks for the pointers but there isnt a 'how to drain' part to the vid. Looking for a more comprehensive how too.

    I looked everywhere in the link to the top of the page but couldnt find it either.

    Probably me, tierd after work etc.
    Cheers
    #4
  5. yuu

    yuu Been here awhile

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    Draining is pretty simple. Open the cap an *slowly* invert the fork over a bucket. I'd suggest having a drop cloth/news paper etc around as it can get messy quickly.

    That slowly remark is important! Not far past parallel to the floor, the spring, spacer and anything else will start to slide towards the low end. As you might figure there will bit a bit of a fluid rush and mess potential when the springs pop out. Be sure to keep the spring etc. from exiting the fork without taking note of orientation of the spring, order of parts when there's a spacer etc etc. Just go slowly.

    Let the spring etc fall in the bucket/drain pan and turn the fork almost all the way upside down. Almost will keep the oil draining from one side, and not just dripping out at random all around the circumference. With it in that position, secure it. A wood jaw vise, bicycle frame 3rd hand etc is perfect - just something softer than aluminum.

    With it clamped down you can gently manually extend the fork slider and cartridge/ rod to pump any oil out of the 'nooks' and really, just let it sit and let gravity do the work. If you've got the time, let it set overnight.

    Another thing I should mention is to be sure you've got control of the fork tube and lower when you move it about. With the cap off the tube will just slide down creating a great mess if you've got the fork clamped by the axle/caliper mount
    #5
  6. DirtyADV

    DirtyADV Long timer

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    #6
  7. Graniteone

    Graniteone 3,2,1...Beer me!

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    #7
  8. rossguzzi

    rossguzzi 990 Adv.

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    Many thanks guys.

    Cheers.
    #8
  9. DirtyADV

    DirtyADV Long timer

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    Had some issues with the inner tube on one of them and the spacer tube running down the middle got jamed on the valve at the bottom ending up with the valve coming back up with pulling the rebound spacer tube out.

    Will do a writeup soon about the inner part of the fork, have done one without any special tools but miss some pictures so need to do the other one and get some better pictures (will look over the other one even if there are no issues just to be safe).

    Was the stock fork I changed seals on. But have another set from a low S model that I had the valve problems with.

    /Johan
    #9
  10. akarob

    akarob Green Cantern

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    If the oil in there hasn't been changed for a year or so, you will also probably want to flush it with some ATF. When refilling, I have found that using a dipstick (such as the OEM oil one) is a good tool to measure the level. I don't know if the 990 dipstick will give you the right level, I haven't had my bike long enough to find out, but on another bike it did.

    All in all, a fluid change is fairly simple.
    #10