Freedom51; a journey of life

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by goodcat, May 27, 2016.

  1. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire Just this guy...

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    Mr. Kiwi, you have done your own fair share of enabling others to live vicariously.
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  2. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    I don't know. I enjoy traveling, and do not consider it a "vacation". I'm roughing it more when traveling than when home (the extended vacation to traveling, hehe). Staying away from home for extended periods in not in the cards for me. To me, that's someting for people who have received an inheritance or otherwise fallen into monetary wealth and have no children of their own or anybody else depending on them to be there. Hell I consider myself lucky to be able to get away at all even if it is in short stints.

    There no place like home. Even the writer of the five stages above is acknowledging that when he declares that he's searching for a home. Home is not the only place where the heart is (some of us have left pieces of our hearts in other places) -- home is where one is needed, where one has a sense of belonging and purpose, of being loved, where one feels safe and secure. When lacking those things, the appeal of long term travel would be greater, if a way to fund it or work on the go (at adequate wages) is available.

    Plus, the idea of traveling to find a home is an excuse, a rationalization, to travel. In this age of internet especially, it's pretty easy to research what places fall within the criteria one establishes as requirements and select from there based on niceties. Of course one has to be logical enough to be able to establish requirements, prioritize, research, and filter. I guess if one is murky on requirements, then sooner or later some place will have adequate draw to feel homeworthy. Perhaps they'll meet someone who makes them feel a sense of purpose. Or maybe they'll just get burned out and settle where they run out of steam.
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  3. Foiler

    Foiler Adventurer

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    agreed 100%
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  4. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Very well stated OnO, very well indeed.
    And for the most I totally agree, except for the internet research. I did that on a few select countries and let me be VERY clear here.... There is nothing that compares to living the experience of a place. I think we all do a little internet browsing about the countries we visit, or at least I would hope people do. But the biggest problem about internet information is the same as reading ride reports. It's very subjective and can only portray what an individual thinks and believes to be true. The people who write travel blogs are very superficial in their information and are usually doing it to obtain social status or monetary gains.
    And I'll use Mexico as a prime example...
    I've met so many people as you all know, and I'll start with where I am at now (Ajijic, Lake Chapala). This retirement community is full of Americans and Canadians who have retired here, BUT they know very little about Mexico culture and surrounding country in any detail. But some are great people here and blend in to the community as well as help the community. And like you said, this place gets attention and inhabitants through word of mouth from friends, and it's still growing here. This isn't a place to call home for my liking, and I've noticed that where a huge population of expats congregate, is equally proportioned to the friendliness of the locals. This town/area does not have the friendly attitudes that an all Mexican community has. People here don't say hello and wish me a good meal as they pass by. It's a much colder attitude here.
    Also... I've met many native Mexicans that couldn't tell an accurate story of their homeland... people, culture, history, politics, weather, flaura/fauna etc...
    In Antigua,Guatemala, there's no way I would have gained the information I did without meeting @GuateRider, while the larger percentage of people I met knew very little about the country they live in. It was his advice to me about buying in Palenque that I should live there for about a year before purchasing and making the decision. And he's absolutey correct on this. There's no way to understand an area in only a few days, weeks or months. One must emmerse themselves in a culture to get a grasp of it's workings.
    The one thing about traveling and meeting people from different countries, is how accurate is the person's description of their own country?
    Even myself as a Canadian, I tell people not to judge Canada based on my perceptions.

    The only way to understand a place is to go there and spend time there.
    I use the internet for basic information and nothing more.
  5. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Amén, Bro. With ya all the way.
    I didn't mean to insinuate you could pick a place to live via internet research. What i was trying to say was that you could narrow the field based on things you decide on. Take weather, for example. Nobody can alter the facts that are readily available. Geography. Cost of living. Accessibility to medical care. Transportation options/availability/cost. The list goes on. There are a lot of things that can be important to a lot of people which can be sorted out by internet research. Research that needn't include any opinions or blogs, just records and facts. It's a field narrowing tool, useful to list places one can go check out, thus eliminating the need to travel the entire world and see places that one wouldn't consider -- if the sole objective is truly to find a place to call home. That's all I'm saying.
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  6. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    Let me add to this Shawn
    I owned a house in a small valley in BC for 22 years and even though I was liked by many locals who were born there, I never was accepted fully into the community. I still have great friends there but they are also people who moved there from outside of the area. I still go back and visit for a few months at a time staying in a tent on a friends property and things are friendly but I am still an outsider. Every thing stated above is so true and listen to Julio's advice.
    Saludos Amigo
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  7. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi 42

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    I've been in living in my local valley for 30 plus years, but because I wasn't born here and didn't go to school here, I'm not a local. Seems the world is the same all over :nod.

    @goodcat - :wave:beer
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  8. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Yeah, clearly if you're born somewhere you're more likely to be accepted as part of the community. And if your parents were born there too, then you're ensconced. It's never the same when someone moves somewhere they weren't brought up. Especially when exercising any kind of cultural differences. Even a regional accent thing.

    "Y'ain't from around here, areya boy?"
    hehe
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  9. Vin

    Vin Hopeless Addict

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    Tarkus - 20 minutes of '70s bliss.

    (I'm a few days behind)
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  10. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Yes I spose you are correct. Some people get so caught up in being a local and have a hard time accepting outsiders. It's funny that being a Canadian, we just accept people for who and what they are. If you are a nice person, that's all the criteria I need. But you must be a RUSH fan or you have to pay a levy to talk to me LMFAO
    The world is a funny place.

    This is a dual response to you and @Cal. I'm too computer challenged to add quotes to my replies.

    I personally don't feel like an outsider in most places because it's my damn planet too and too be honest, if you give me a hard time about being in your country, there will be trouble.
    Remember the song This land is your land this land is my land? Well it's TRUE !!!
    So unless you're ISIS or some kinda freak, it's all good.
    I could go on and on about this topic but it's better suited for face to face talk.

    I need to get moving and post pictures, cause all this typing is bad for my carpel tunnel hahaha

    Pictures are much cooler anyway LOL
  11. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Hell yeah brother.
    And I'm gonna play some ELP right now on my traveling JBL speaker.
    Rockn it out for the Mexicans hahaha

    And Tarkus starts it off :clap
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  12. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    I commented dually on Kiwi's comment.

    But its very possible we will meet up on your journey down. So keep in touch matey:bmwrider
  13. Goldie05

    Goldie05 Fast George

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    Gee, I was asking Michnus about you and he told me to read your ride report here, I come here and immediately come upon all this drama :lol3:imaposer
    Thank goodness I don't have my ugly face on every photo, I like to cover it up with a helmet :D

    I didn't know you had a thread here, now I'm subscribed and hope to contribute to this madness :photog
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  14. Goldie05

    Goldie05 Fast George

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    I promise I won't promote anything or say I conquered South America :lol3
    I only wish I had the time to do it like you and Shawn, believe me, if I won the lottery I would be like others here, I have already told my wife, if I win the lottery I will be gone on a one way around the world trip for a very very long time :lol3

    The only good thing with Facebook is that it's easy to follow people and see posts come up on the stream, here it's a bit more difficult because you can subscribe but then have to read or scan through all the other comments until we find the OP of the thread. Some threads have too much noise :D
    I find Instagram to be exactly what Shawn was complaining, too many posts with faces and butts on them :(
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  15. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    That oughta show em! :lol3

    Let's not forget the cool-ass cover art!!
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  16. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    We do not have kids and bought passive income investments when we both were still working. Those investments now is what supporting us. Okay i cant go buy a damn BMW and some Ferraris but if we keep our expenses in check we can keep going. It is possible to travel continuously but some sacrifices has to be made. Not having kids is a blessing for me, I can't imagine a life with kids, I swear it will suffocate me. I don't hate kids, just not mine, but it helps not having kids when this is the kind of lifestyle you want :lol3

    Our home is still in ZA and we rent it out, but the longer we stay away from ZA the less I feel the need to HAVE a place like home. We spend 2 months in Guadelajara when Elsebie had her knee operation and we quickly became part of the community and it was home for us for that time. We can make a home any where. Yeah no doubt our home in ZA is nice, our friends, local dives and hangouts, but since we started travelling in 2010 I feel like I am a world citizen, I can be at home anywhere. Yeah, there are shit holes and would not stay there.

    Also I dont mind that a community will never accept me as part of them, I don't care, it is how they feel and people are just like that. As long as they respect me and I them and we get along good enough. We learn from each other and hopefully go away better people.

    We just never get bored, everyday there's something new to see, another turn in the road to something more interesting and captivating. Our business still goes on and we explore new business opportunities while travelling. And we get new ideas while on the road. The best is that you learn so much about other markets and how people see things and why things work for them and not in other countries. This world is truly amazing! :thumb

    Absolutely Shawn, time spend in a place is what counts. And we have seen it so many times, even the Cuba articles were horrendously incorrect and utter bullshit!! The travel articles paid by companies and magazines are so wrong it's wrong being wrong! There's so much bullshit peddled it's difficult to make out good from bad. But in the end it is better to go see for yourself as you have done.
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  17. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    We can talk bullsshit and swear here, you can't do that on Faceoffended :lol3
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  18. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Thanks for checking in George.
    Sorry you stepped in during the drama, I should have put up warning signs haha
    But it's an important topic that many people only talk about in private. It's good to get it out in the open.
    Consider this the rider's therapy section :rofl

    People should post their bare arse with bike and not their face with bike.... Let's get to the real naked truth :jack

    Enjoy your adventure mate.
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  19. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Great comments Michnus and Goldie.

    I posted last night about the Home topic but erased it because I didn't express myself properly. But you said it well Michnus.

    The world is my home and that's how I prefer it.
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  20. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Thank you for this insight, Michnus.
    The beauty is that you are able to do this, and you choose bike travel. I think that's rare and special. And you're doing it because you want to, rather than under some false pretense. That's facing reality head-on.

    As for kids, it's opposite for me. I can't imagine my life without my kids and I think they're by far the biggest blessing in my wife's and my life. And now the grandkids are rolling in, it's truly amazing. Of course they're more brilliant than regular kids :lol3 But that's what makes this world amazing - people. It wouldn't last much longer without kids.

    I don't know what you read about Cuba before going there. I didn't spend a lot of time reading other people's impressions but did read a few and watched a few YouTube videos just to get a rough idea ahead of time. I didn't see where they were far off tha mark. I really only pay attention to the more factual observation stuff though, and not the interpretive like/dislike stuff.

    That said, two people can get two different impressions of the same place. Much depends what an individual appreciates in travel. There are a lot of variables, all imaginable given thought, one example would be the level of luxury one may consider adequate. Another, customs that are considered reasonable. Another, how well one can communicate wtih the people.

    I feel strongly that our ability to communicate on a thorough level in Spanish made for a far more enrichening experience for us than it would have been otherwise. I mean, we were truly entrenched in the culture and lives of some of the people there, not just the typical superficial glossing over. Most of the people there are impressively warm and welcoming. Some, amazingly so. We were told "you have a home here anytime whether you bring CUCs or not". And they were sincere. The only thing I wished for was a bike to ride around on. And one friend we made put us on his scooter and sent us to go for a ride! I found out later he could have gotten in serious trouble with the government for that, and yet he would have known, and let his generous spirit overcome that possibility. There was some element of danger to us as well, but that only scratches the surface considering some other stuff we got into there.

    Could we enjoy living there? Absolutely!

    Rum was $5.20 for a liter, añejo blanco.

    Enjoy Colombia! And Ecuador! Me encanta El Ecuador, y tenemos familia allí.

    :D
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