Freedom51; a journey of life

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by goodcat, May 27, 2016.

  1. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    Michnus, you reinforce my observations that all the people I've seen on long term journeys are either single, or a couple, but don't have kids, or a solo business owner.

    Being both, you just can't leave for any length of time (I'm never gone for more than a week) before retirement...
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  2. Goldie05

    Goldie05 Fast George

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    Exactly, I'm struggling right now because I AM going next year but originally was planning on 6 months and now because of Michnus and Shawn I'm finding it's not going to be enough time to actually enjoy :(

    I'm having trouble leaving my wife for such a long time and my kids. My son not so much because he's working and is already 27 soon to be 28 but my daughter just started her junior year in college and when I leave next year she will start her senior year. I feel I need to be here to support her :(

    There's also the taking care of the house because I can't rent it, my wife needs a place to stay :lol3 and I still have to continue paying damn NJ property taxes :hair

    Oh the dilemma :baldy
  3. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Allow me to try and ease your pain.
    In this computer age its so much easier to feel like your still with loved ones and friends. A video chat will do wonders for inner peace. Of course it's look but don't touch interaction, but the live experiences of travel will more than make up for it.
    I found 6 months to be the break in period. It takes a long time to settle down and really feel comfortable. Once past 6 mnths and into a year, life on the road just feels like living a normal life.

    It's good you are giving it a go while you can. Don't get too involved in pre planning.... it will drive you nuts. Once you've crossed a border then it starts to gel.
    You have made some good online friends and they will be glad to help in any way you need. Don't be shy about letting your feelings show. We all need help once in a while and advice from real travelers is your best information source.

    good luck and safe travels George
  4. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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  5. OtterChaos

    OtterChaos Guzzi Sud!

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    I don't know man, don't fall into a trap of trying to define your trip before you go. Six months can be enough to get sense of what you are seeing while six years is not enough to absorb it all. I certainly ran into issues when my trip went sideways due to unmet expectations and stress and didn't meet my idea of an ADVRider forum trip but I did learn some things anyways. My focus now it leaning into what is happening to me and not trying to relate it to others so much, for example my friend helps me with Yoga and I really enjoy it but there is no way I am as flexible or balanced as she is and if I worried about that I'd lose the fact that I can sense improvement in myself. Ride your own ride seems apt more than ever to me.
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  6. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Yep I didn't hear "ride your own ride" until seeing it on the riding forum, but I soon realized the concept applies to life in general. I also make a paralell of motorcycle riding to life in general: we pick a path through the obstacles we see which lay ahead, try to stay balanced and avoid the pitfalls - one never knows what's around the next bend or over the next rise, but the least one anticipates what it is, the better prepared to deal with it one is.

    George, although different things work for different people, me - I couldn't see myself running off and being away from my wife and kids/grandkids for months at a time. For many reasons including I feel my life doesn't just revolve around me.

    Our son lives far now, and while video chatting certainly does help, it by no means replaces being with and doiing things with him and his family.
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  7. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi 42

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    Wow, what an interesting conversation. Constructive in tone too. Good stuff.
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  8. Goldie05

    Goldie05 Fast George

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    This is the problem with ADVrider, threads get hijacked :lol3

    Sorry, please continue posting so I can live through you guys for now :(
    6 months, more or maybe less, I will still go. One of my problems is I always plan and plan everything but I agree with you, it's driving me nuts soooo
    Keep on posting :D
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  9. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Shawn provides a great example of how to make plans and stick to them.
    :imaposer

    Seriously though it makes sense to plan for contingencies. And a general route through things hoped to be seen. All while remaining open to adaptations. Unanticipated detours can be the best part of a journey.
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  10. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Ha...
    I just meant don't overthink your pre-planning and that includes the gear you take.
    And to be honest... If I was to do C America again... I wouldn't take my camping gear.
    Its just not worth all the extra weight and room it takes. Accommodations are so cheap and finding camping is not that easy either.
    And any necessities you may need can be bought on the go and much cheaper than in N America with the exception of bike parts.
    Do some research and maybe plot out where your specific parts can be found.
    If I were to repack for this trip, I'll bet I would only need my 2 saddle bags and a small tank bag.
    But the one most important item in my opinion is a mounted GPS on the control tower. Not the handlebars!!!!
    Trust me, the less you have to look down, the easier it is to read and is much safer in traffic conditions.
    Tools, medical kit, toiletries, clothes, computer or phone and make a basic list of important places you want to visit and you are pretty much ready to hit the road.

    PS... It's not hijacking my thread unless I say it is :imaposer :photog

    Pretty much anything goes here with the exception of Religion and politics. These are always trouble topics no matter where they are brought up.

    And for a 6 mnth trip, I wouldn't plan on anything farther south than Panama to properly soak up what C America has to offer.
    South America would be another 6 mnths and so on and so on.

    And if you don't accept any of the above advice then for God sakes.... DO NOT overload your bike!!!! It's a bike not a truck and no matter what anyone tells you... Bikes are not designed to take a mountain of extra weight. Not even the mighty GS 1200's that some people think are a pack mule.
  11. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    How much to carry depends on the weather to be prepared for. I took one small backpack to Cuba, took two for the PNW, for a couple weeks each. Difference being clothes for cooler climes take a lot more room!

    eh?
    :patch
  12. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    I've carried nothing but a HH sweater this whole trip and never needed anything heavier. Do you really want to pack a winter coat for a maybe a few nights of cold weaAnd again... things can be bought on the road either new or at the markets.
    I think many people believe that stepping into a 3rd world country means not being able to buy quality goods. That is a misconception and almost anything you will need can be found here in the 3rd world. Even if you want to buy a Ferrari... it's there LOL

    And another important note.... make sure your suspension is worthy of a long trip and can carry extra weight for extended periods. Take care of this before you go or it could be troublesome and expensive in a foreign land.

    Have I covered everything?
    I doubt it, but remember everyone deals with different issues and there is absolutely no way to cover all the bases. So it's best to ride and take care of problems as they come. It's no different than living at home.
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  13. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi 42

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    Good point on suspension. I have modified the suspension on both of my bikes exactly for this reason. Bikes are set up by manufacturers for the average weight person in riding gear, with the average person in gear being around 84kgs. there is limited adjustability in stock suspension to cater for luggage, but not always enough. I'm 120kg in gear before luggage.

    On my transalp I put in new suspension and had it set up by a specialist for my weight in riding gear which then gave me pre-load and redound adjustments for when I loaded the bike with luggage. It made a huge difference not only in riding comfort, but the safe operation of the bike over a wide range and variety of road surfaces. It was money well spent.
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  14. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Let me just be very, very clear. Nor Shawn nor me wants to define Goldie's trip for him. The option we offer him is to not rush from the USA to Ushuaia for whatever reason. Especially in 6 months. That is all. Go at your pace whatever, but to go from the USA to Ushuaia in 6 months is more riding and not much else. It sounds like a long time but it is not. Time flies when on a trip and you have to leave time to really take in a place and visit places and sit on a beach for a few days and not have to ride nearly everyday. Rather do a few countries well than do a lot and see tar roads.

    Just my 2c
  15. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    On the gear and what you take with post. It is possible to buy stuff on the road. But if you use specific stuff then it's just not that easy to get. You can import it but it cost money and time. I use Merino wool tshirts from Icebreaker and KLIM and other stuff like underpants. They are light, pack light, dry easy, don't stink for a week and last long. Cotton don't last and are in all aspects the opposite of Merino wool. I can't buy that in other countries other than the USA , Eu, Aus an so on. Also we use each a Merino sweater and a rain jacket that packs really small.

    The thing is like this, the lighter, compact you go the price increase in proportion to size and weight. There is a premium on stuff as you want more compact and lightweight technical stuff. So my tent is 2.5kg again you can only buy those tents in the USA and Eu and so on. Yes you can buy a cheap tent in Mexico or Colombia but it will not be waterproof and won't last a month. In Africa we camped 550 days. That was pitching and packing the tent nearly everyday.
    We were now looking for sleeping bags to use on altitude and could not find any in Colombia. At least -10c Our option was to get from the USA at a huuuuge cost. We got a shitty one at a local store but it's not good for -5c nights. Okay we don't camp at that altitude often but when you do you need them. There is no in between. And again they had to be small, lightweight and compact. Some countries you don't need camping stuff as hotels are cheap, but then you carry your camp stuff anyway. Can't go buy new ones every time you get into a place. Our camp stuff is less than 7kg.

    The stuff we have used and filtered through use now after 7 years of use we know work and they last long. As we know we were going to do more offroad in South America again we dropped our weight to 30kg each on the bike. We can most probably drop more but de hell with that, I can't sit on the ground and camp, I need a chair. :lol3
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  16. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Definitely high quality specifics need to be bought at home, especially camping gear and electronics.
    I didn't mean to imply buy all your stuff in Latin America. And good luck trying to find any quality camping gear stores. Camping is not popular hear for several reasons.
    I was mostly referring to day to day stuff..... and Ferrari's :imaposer


    I have 2 Merino wool shirts and personally don't like them anymore. Especially for the price. But that's my opinion. But the main reason I don't like them is because I find them scratchy like wool (maybe because they are real wool haha). Guess I have baby sensitive skin LOL

    We'll get ya sorted out George haha
    But bring what makes you feel comfortable to bring and after 6 mnths you'll have a much better idea for your next trip.

    But if you bring camping gear.... then I totally agree with Michnus that those Helinox chairs are pure heaven and a necessity.
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  17. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Kids does add a whole different dimension of difficulty to the thing. Money, education and keeping them entertained I can imagine is a task not for the fainthearted. I have huge respect for people travelling with kids, they have huge brass balls . :D

    We saw in Africa quite a few families with young kids, anything from 2-5 in a van or truck, so it can be done. :yikes
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  18. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    @goodcat = Definitely high quality specifics need to be bought at home, especially camping gear and electronics.
    I didn't mean to imply buy all your stuff in Latin America. And good luck trying to find any quality camping gear stores. Camping is not popular hear for several reasons.
    I was mostly referring to day to day stuff..... and Ferrari's :imaposer
    yup got you on that, I understood what you said, agree with that. :thumb

    I have 2 Merino wool shirts and personally don't like them anymore. Especially for the price. But that's my opinion. But the main reason I don't like them is because I find them scratchy like wool (maybe because they are real wool haha). Guess I have baby sensitive skin LOL
    You have to buy when they have discounts and then it is last years stuff. I am very finicky on my Brat Pitt looks and only choose pastel colours on sale. :chace
    Drink tequila man, it will harden your skin up!
    :lol3:evil

    We'll get ya sorted out George haha
    But bring what makes you feel comfortable to bring and after 6 mnths you'll have a much better idea for your next trip.

    But if you bring camping gear.... then I totally agree with Michnus that those Helinox chairs are pure heaven and a necessity.
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  19. moto.phil

    moto.phil Been here awhile

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    I said it before (in person) but have to say again: 32degrees cool shirts! Poliester/spandex mix that feels super soft (better than cotton imho), dries like any other synthetic and doesn't stink as quickly as poliester itself (maybe not quite a week like the merino but 3-4 days were not a problem for me. And at a price tag of 9-15$ I can'tsay no. Unfortunately they do not sell them in Europe so I will have friends fromthe US bring me a stack whenI'm back home.

    Merino same like shawn, I am supersensitive to itching and for me they wouldn't do... too expensive anyway for a shirt. And if the shirt itches Icertainly won't put the merino on my balls :rofl

    Sleeping bags, there is certainly many good brands out there but probably the best packsize/weight/warmth ratio you will find in western mountaineering. Expensive but quality down with an awesome loft, super compressible! Thanks to goodcat I started to take better care of it and decompress it regularly while staying in hotels.




    ---
    ADVrider RR: https://goo.gl/sLWhMc
    Website: www.motophil.ch
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  20. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Wtf is wrong with you two, did Guatemala soften the skins a bit too much? :lol3

    I grew up walking 20miles to school without shoes and only a deer skin to throw over the shoulders for warmth, had to fight off Lions and shit roaming the street those years in Johannesburg. Merino is like cotton floss on a baby's bum. :D That polyester stuff feels like I am wearing plastic bags.

    In any case, I think the thing is quality stuff will last for years where as China's best will go for a few months.
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