Friend wants a scooter...

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by BonneRocker, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. BonneRocker

    BonneRocker Been here awhile

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    !
    #1
  2. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    I think he's right to consider a 150, unless he's in an area where a 50cc bike is in its sweet spot of a 35-40mph cruise in dense traffic where it's doing similar speed. If a 50 will do--safely--tell him. But make sure you know what his commute will require so that he's not underpowered.

    Perhaps they took MSF and are in fact growing into the sport well. :dunno

    So tell him why it's important to wear gloves. There is no such thing as a stupid question from a n00b. It's how they become ex-n00bs and non-squids.

    Not all motorcyclists are daredevils or WOT people. In fact, I'd be worried if he had said the opposite, or that the riders around him told him that they are daredevils.

    You need to know how to assess and manage your risk.

    Maybe not to you, but to many people it is. For me, in fact, it's my primary reason for scooter commuting instead of using my 1150GS or Jeep.

    Different words. Not everyone feels the same way, and even so, why judge how he'll be as a rider based on his current n00b choice of words? Passion can also imply a lack of clear-headed thought processes. So don't be picky on words--he only knows what he's seen and read. If he were a 300K rider perhaps his word choices would be different. Right now two of his primary influences are 1) the other HD n00bs and 2) you. What kind of information is he getting from those two sources? What kind of information and vibe are you giving him? Consider also that if he's dead-set on riding, and you tell him to NOT ride, he'll simply turn his attention to soaking up info from n00b riders who may not be as experienced.

    You get to tell him that. You get to tell him it takes a commitment to safety or else he'll be a smear on the pavement leaving a widow and fatherless child...or risk serious injury that will change their lives forever. That's valid and I think it's worth an eye-to-eye serious talk with your friend. Just because it's a small, cute bike doesn't mean it's any less capable of killing him should he get lax. Y

    The first thing I suggest to any n00b is to get into an MSF BRC or MSF scooter class and in the second breath I provide them with the contact info they need to do so. From there, let the ridercoach work with him. If you have not taken MSF, take it with him. You'll have fun, and will be able to reinforce what he learns as he grows, using the same terminology.

    Instead of being judge/jury on this, refer him to an MSF course that will help him explore skills and judgement in a safe environment. His verbage reflects what he knows about riding now, but not what he *can* know given the right training and mentoring afterwards.

    I see it in every MSF class I teach.

    I have counselled-out those who do not have their head in the game. But I have some yardsticks to use to make that determination. And in the end, every rider is responsible for their own safety.

    Get him into MSF, and be a good mentor by demonstrating good ATGATT habits and good judgment on the street.

    If he's an absolutely clueless turd behind the wheel, and you have real instances to refer to, tell him how those lapses in attention could kill him.
    #2
  3. BonneRocker

    BonneRocker Been here awhile

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    Austin, Texas
    Thanks Photog
    #3