From a "fast" bike to a Bonneville?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Av8rPaul, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. single

    single Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    121
    I hope this comment was not serious? I would argue in the camp that ALL modern bikes have come a long way from the old ones and if you have your heart set on a bike there is nothing mechanically that should stop you - but the poster is looking for honest opinions about Triumphs and there are plenty of negative things that could be said about any of their bikes. The fact is there is not one bike for everyone and not everybody likes all bikes.

    Pretending that the entire brand's line up is beyond reproach is simply not really helpful to the discussion.
    #61
  2. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    8,442
    Location:
    Nippon
    Hi, I'm Harley Davidson, its nice to meet you.

    I heard Triumph made a bike that weighs right around 420lbs and puts 110hp/40ft/lbs to the ground with a super sport grade suspension

    ...its called a Streed Triple R.

    I may add its a decent bike on top of that
    #62
  3. GoonerYoda

    GoonerYoda Hot Dickens Cider

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    846
    Location:
    Wine Country, CA
    If you don't get, you never will. Just like I will never understand why someone would want to ride super sport bikes on the street. You cannot totally enjoy such machines unless you have access to a track. They are just way too quick, stop too quickly (sometimes, that can be a good thing I know) and too twitchy on the street. And more often than not, people are just dumb asses on them. I now...I've been there on the Daytona 675.

    Different strokes for different folks. Just ride what you like and be safe.
    #63
  4. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,069
    Location:
    Chandler, AZ
    ANYBODY can find plenty of negative things about ANY bike, it it does not suit them. Obviously if you want a crotch rocket, a Bonnie is not for you. But if you are interested in the kind of ride a Bonneville provides, there is NO reason not to buy one. They are not the bikes they once were, and someone who has ridden an original is going to notice that right away. I like character. I like vibration. I like noise. I also like the shifter on the left side where it belongs.

    But back on topic. Take one for a test ride. If you like it, there is no reason not to buy it. Everything works just fine, including the handling and brakes, and they have no known mechanical issues. Just get on and ride for 100,000 miles or so, and keep up on the simple maintenance. I would get the centerstand, even with the cast wheel model. Makes chain maintenance much easier, what there is. It's not like the old days where you had to oil it every 50 miles and adjust it every 300 miles. On a lower power bike, that 0-ring chain will last forever.

    Edit: while searching for a Sportster, I found this a couple days ago. It's right at my upper price limit. I almost bought it, but didn't know if I would be happy with it or not. It feels perfect, and it fits perfect. I may talk myself into it yet.

    http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/mcd/3653978321.html
    #64
  5. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,996
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, Ca
    this begs the question, if the Bonnie was that slow why were you riding it if really what you wanted was a Street/Speed Triple? That's like buying a Mini and complaining about the trunk space

    now making an 1800cc bike slow is something else entirely!

    :lol3


    I dont pretend that Triumphs are perfect, nor did I say they were. All I was saying is that nearly every single person I talk to that rides a Triumph, loves it. Triumphs seems to, and always have, give people a warm fuzzy feeling of sorts..... and nobody loved the original ones because they were perfect. They were crappy in lots of ways and oddly this is a huge reason people end up loving certain bikes in the end.
    For years I was on the fence for getting one and every time I saw someone riding one I would talk to them about it and I can honestly say every single person I talked to about their bikes had nothing but good things to say.
    I went to a Triumph test ride day and rode 4 bikes and liked them all. I liked the Scrambler and the Speedy 3 the most. yes the scambler is "slow" and the Speed is..... well cmon they call it a Speed Triple....and it made it very hard to choose between the two because of how different they were.
    I ended up with a Speed Triple and Im become obsessed with it. I absolutely love this bike.
    I WILL have a Scrambler/Bonnie someday without question.

    because some days are fire-breathing Speed Triple days with big wheelies and rev limiters while wearing leathers. Other days are a bonneville while wearing jeans and wandering around enjoying a windy old road.

    Personally, I love some of these retro bikes that give us some options away from the modern "standards" like the 919 which aren't really what I consider when I think about a standard
    #65
  6. Antiquar

    Antiquar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I'm riding a Thruxton right now, though I've been thinking of picking up one of the Triumph triples.

    I can say that the Thruxton, after you open it up with better pipes and airflow, is more than fast enough on the road. Its top speed is good. Acceleration is okay, certainly faster than most cars on the road, but you'll have to play around the gears to pass quickly on the highway. It's fast enough for most twisties.

    My biggest complaints are utilitarian. Luggage options are limited. I'm getting 40-45 MPG right now. That, coupled with the small tank, makes for a limited fuel range. I'll fill up every 100 - 140 miles. Max range is just upwards of 150 miles.

    I will say that, even though I'm considering another bike, I plan to keep the Thruxton. At the very least as a project bike. :)
    #66
  7. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,996
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, Ca
    While out having fun you can expect to get about half that from a Speed Triple. Yes, you can still do ~140 miles on a tank while riding like a sane person, but you will find that riding like a sane person becomes extremely difficult.
    I didn't even know I had an evil laugh until I bought an S3.
    #67
  8. YJake

    YJake Roaming

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    538
    Location:
    West Panhandle, FL
    Reminds me of myself when I rode my naked Bandit 1200 home :freaky

    -Jake
    #68
  9. Antiquar

    Antiquar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    :rofl
    That's quite a ringing endorsement.

    There are opposing desires fighting for supremacy in my search for another bike.

    One part of me wants a Tiger 800, a DL-650, or perhaps a MG Stelvio. I want to have nice luggage options, throw on a windscreen for comfortable highway riding, and have one hell of a utilitarian bike.

    The other part wants a Street or Speed Triple and to go mad.

    I have no idea how to reconcile these desires. Buy both I suppose. It's the only way.
    #69
  10. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,996
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, Ca
    there is only one way to solve this and it's extremely simple.... and it worked for me....

    You have to have both.

    -
    Also where are you in LA?

    :ear
    #70
  11. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    8,442
    Location:
    Nippon
    Is that all the 1050s are getting?

    My 955i gets about 180-190 stock gearing, and right around 160 with my -1+3 cogs on it.

    I've done just a little work to the motor, but it always got around that.
    #71
  12. Antiquar

    Antiquar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I ought to sell my car. I could probably afford both bikes then...

    I'm just on the border of East Hollywood, Silverlake, and Los Feliz. Near Vermont and Fountain.
    #72
  13. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,996
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, Ca
    if you have a GS or Tiger with boxes, you'll forget you have a car. Im not kidding.
    #73
  14. Scrivens

    Scrivens Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    648
    Location:
    usually the garage
    Hepco & Becker have finally released the bag mounts and rack for the Bonnie. I've got them (Junior hardcases & topbox) on the W800 and Honda 900 Hornet and they are excellent. About the same price as Givi but better quality.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #74
  15. Antiquar

    Antiquar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Some attractive luggage there. Thanks for the heads up!
    #75
  16. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,461
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    A simple seat swap from a t100 or pre 2010 bonneville se, will get the seat to peg ratio the same as the t-100 on the floor.

    Ad a set of lowered peg brackets to the mix and you are comfortable.

    The stock seats suck, I ride a 2013 Bonneville as my sole mode of transport, I swapped to the earlier seat, put on some atv bars, and some home grown luggage racks with seahorse cases. It's great, though after a 250 mile ride, my lower back is sore, due to the seat.

    [​IMG]
    #76
  17. alii1959

    alii1959 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    677
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Cool set up Scrivens!

    When I purchased my '08 GSXR600 I was really torn between it and a Bonnie. I really like Triumphs and the Bonnie is so cool.

    What is funny to me about this discussion is the fact that going from a sport-bike to a Bonnie isn't considered a regression, but a choice. Which I fully understand and agree with...and so do most of the other posters. But, had the OP wanted to go to a Harley....well that would somehow be different???

    I rode my GSXR for 18K and really enjoyed it. But, my back began to really complain. I chose to go in the direction of the Harley ('04 Road King) for the very reasons many of the posters have mentioned. Sure, it is not as fast as my sportbike was, but I don't risk tickets and getting in over my head as easy. It doesn't brake like the sportbike, but who would expect it to? It is just weird to me that choosing a KLR (which are easily out-paced by a Prius) or a Bonnie is acceptable, but the Harley isn't.

    All that said, I would love to add a Bonnie one day. I still have quite a bit of Triumph stuff lying about that I cannot seem to part with, even though my Sprint is long gone.

    Regardless of which bike you choose, make sure it is the one that sparks the flame inside you. The one that makes the open road, trail, or track call to you for just a little more adventure!!
    #77
  18. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,996
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, Ca
    the previous owner geared it down a little and had a super rich, performance map loaded. Ive bought the cable to upload a slightly leaner map eventually....
    So the acceleration is, good.

    :nod
    #78
  19. propforward

    propforward PIE!romaniac

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Oddometer:
    13,128
    Location:
    Central Minnesota
    Ah, you've experienced that eh? Yes, a great feeling.

    I also have a Bonneville. Excellent bike. Just so much simple fun. Even after riding other much more powerful bikes. I won't give my Bonneville up if I can help it.
    #79
  20. Duck Dodgers

    Duck Dodgers Rock n’ Roll Refugee

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    547
    Location:
    The muddle of Kalifornia
    I moved from an FJR to a Bonnie. I enjoyed the FJR and all the Tupperware and storage. The weight and it's less than friendly short hop around town issues got me looking. (not that I needed a reason to look at bikes)

    I really enjoy the bike it is simple to maneuver and set up how you would like. It has it's issues but nothing $$$ can't fix.

    It is NOT any of you previous bikes.

    For me it brought back that feeling I first got 40 years ago. Or put another way I had to work at reasons to ride the FJR less than 40 miles in any one direction, short rides were work. With the Bonnie it may take two trips to the hardware store instead of one on the FJR.

    SO what,more sMiles put on the bike.
    #80