From a "fast" bike to a Bonneville?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Av8rPaul, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Scrivens

    Scrivens Been here awhile

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    I've got the H&B racks on my other bikes as well, so the bags just swap over. They really are good stuff. I think they took over from Krauser as the old Krausers I had on my Beemers fitted onto the H&B frames.

    I own an '07 883 standard Sportster as well and it is a great bike, like all the modern Harleys. Uncannily smooth at 100-120km/h cruise, comfortable as an old chair, very well built, reliable as a rock, virtual nil maintenance and excellent fuel consumption. The only downside is the 3.3 gal tank and the difficulty fitting a larger tank to a fuel injected bike. I put Road King shocks, tacho and a few other goodies on mine and it is a very good touring bike. I like the Road Kings but don't have the garage space to fit one - big bikes.

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    #81
  2. Garry

    Garry Old and In The Way

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    It would be nice if Triumph still offered a bike like the Thunderbird Sport in their "classic" series: triple discs, fully-adjustable suspension, strong linear power from the triple, but classic looks/lines. That was a really sweet bike.

    I was sad when Triumph reused the name for the new cruiser.
    #82
  3. conchscooter

    conchscooter Long timer

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    I just got back from three days on the road, actually rather boring freeway there and back to attend a family gathering in Georgia. My 2007 is stock with cheap luggage, a Parabellum windshield and handlebar muffs for the cold and the rain. I don't like weather below 70 degrees but needs must and I saw 45 degrees on this trip. In the summer I like to ride from Key West to the mountains, a 12 hour ride and spend a few days riding the twisties. If i get to do that two or three times in a summer its a good year for me, living as I do in very southern, deliciously warm Flatistan.

    I used the stock seat for the first 68,000 miles and had Sargeants of Jacksonville re-stuff and a fine job they did. Cruising at 80mph indicated (75mph GPS) reduces mpg to 38 but is quite comfortable. I've done an Iron Butt 1000 and a 1500 on the stock seat. I guess I am unusually resilient in the end , as it were.

    I really don't care much about the argument that the Bonneville should be something its not. I like riding it, its easy, it does everthing and its as relaible as any bike you could name. Its cheap to buy cheap to run and easy to modify. Don't like the suspension? there are vendors lined up to sell you bolt on replacements. Want more power? Boost it to 904 ccs or spend $30,000 and get a Hyde Harrier conversion out of the box.


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    Or if you are like me and prefer to ride, just buy one and ride it. I really don't give a toss about people who walk up and spout off about their old triumphs. I'm glad they get a thrill from seeing it but thats obviously not why I own a retro. Mine is a bit too hard used to be pretty anymore. Not exactly eye candy. I enjoy the retro look but I never wanted to own a Bonneville in the 70s because they were gruesomely unreliable. Riding this style of all purpose bike reminds me of the bikes I used to ride, but I don't expect it to be a replica of anything in particular. The true modern equivalent of the oriinal superbike Bonnie is the Speed Triple.

    I would prefer a sportster for the hydraulic valves but you know what? I just love the fat frumpy slow faux Bonneville. I can't help it.
    #83
  4. Calamity Jesus

    Calamity Jesus n0ob

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    The Bonneville engine is far more powerful than most of the other 800cc air cooled motors out there and it's about 2 seconds faster in the 1/4mi than similar machines made by a certain American company. Let's get some perspective before we start calling something slow.
    As the owner of a mag wheel '09 with Thruxton length shocks (aluminum bodied Icons), I can assure you that it is a 20 minute job involving 4 bolts and a chain adjustment. There are no I'll effects to speak of unless your inseam lacks. That salesman just wanted the extra $20 in commission.

    Sorry for the necrobump, but someone needed to say it.
    #84
  5. Gootch

    Gootch Been here awhile

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    Since this thread is bumped, get the Thruxton. You can thrash it at 90 all day long and hang in curves with all but the best sport bike riders. I have both a CBR 600 and a Thruxton and I'll even choose to take the Thruxton on sport-tour rides (just beware the small tank and bad mielage).
    #85
  6. PalePhase

    PalePhase Humour Noir

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    Really small world! I've ridden out of Newnan, at least (when I bought my VFR). :freaky
    #86
  7. jamboa

    jamboa jamboa

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    The Bonnie is a great one person touring machine! Atleast the way mine is set up. Did a 6500 mile trip last summer about this time. Now it is off to Colorado for an expecting 3666 miles!
    #87
  8. NuckaMan

    NuckaMan Space Available

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    I've got a GS and Concours-14 in the garage, just added a mag-wheeled Bonneville and I'm in love with it.

    I was eyeing the CB1100 REALLY hard but for my intended purposes, I could not justify the extra $3.5K for the Honda....probably the first rational decision I have made when it came to motorcycling.

    After swapping out the shitty stock shocks and seat, I would have no reseverations taking the little guy for a multi-day ride far from home.

    It's more home in the backwoods and streets vs. open highway, but it has no real issues cruising 80MPH. I think it would be up to the riders own personal comfort level keeping it there for long periods of time, more than the bike itself.
    #88
  9. duckman

    duckman co conspirator

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    what windshield is that
    #89
  10. BadKarma

    BadKarma Long timer

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    You can bolt on a Sportster "Custom" 4.5 gallon tank for that bike. I see em on Ebay all the time...
    #90
  11. The Killstar

    The Killstar Ted Simon Acolyte

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    HEY a new Bonneville thread for me to post pics of my touring machine!
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    #91
  12. none

    none Been here awhile

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    #92
  13. coneye

    coneye Adventurer

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    I've never owned or ridden sports bikes , always owned big cruisers , 18 months ago bought a t 100 for sundays in the hills at the back of me , and loved it , i found i could'nt actually go any faster on the bonnie than what i could on its big brother the rocket , But it was easier , less weight and just felt faster , which made it more fun ,

    But i never did like the look of it and sick of riding the same roads , i just got rid of the bonnie and bought the v strom , so i could have a look up the many dirt roads ,, what has been a BIG BONUS , is i find the v strom for me anyway handles the twisties better than the bonnie .

    I can go a lot faster on the strom around the hills near my house than the rocket or the bonnie , one paticular route i tajke often i could'nt shave time between the rocket and bonnie , i'm like 5-10 minuites quicker depending if i get stuck behind farmer jones on the v strom not a lot but thats only over 50 klm
    #93
  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    That's sorta what I was talking about earlier (post #4 on page 1 of this thread)... Everyone's different of course, but nowadays, I just don't care about how "fast" I am, or my "times" on a route. I don't ride on a racetrack, and I'm not competing with anyone, not even myself. I ride strictly for the FUN of it. :clap It's all about the sensations that I enjoy. I still have faster bikes in my garage, but I don't find that I really enjoy them any more than my Sportster. Don't get me wrong though. I still enjoy a spirited pace on a nice curvy road, and I still ride my Sportster with the same zeal that I rode/ride anything else. My overall, over the road, speeds may be lower, but in the real world, with deer, cops, etc, that's not necessarily a bad thing as long as I'm still having just as much fun. The old adage about riding a slow bike fast, rather than a fast bike slow, comes to mind. And for me at least seems to be true to a great extent.

    Of course everyone has to find their own place in this balance of speed vs. fun so, YMMV.
    #94
  15. coneye

    coneye Adventurer

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    Speeding to go fast is not sometrhing i do , i rarely speed , not in this revenue raising state, where cameras are behind every second bush .

    But you can have fun on tweistie roads within the speed limits , the bend that was posted 45 klm on the rocket or bonnie , i may of took comfortably at 65 , with the strom i'm comfortable at 85 , the 55 klm bend may well of been 80 kl on the triumphs , on the strom its the speed limit of 100 , all riding within the speed limits and within my limits .

    All equals good fun
    #95
  16. Jtourismo

    Jtourismo Adventurer

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    I really like the ethos of this thread, and have been captured by the bonnie lure after my buddy built a hardtail earlier this summer from a basket case bike. Up until this point I have definitely been making sure my next bike was always faster than the last.
    After dealing with the cost of insurance and maybe getting a tolerance to speed, the classic twins keep looking better and better.
    #96
  17. Av8rPaul

    Av8rPaul Have bike will travel

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    Thanks for keeping this thread going and all the good conversation. I've been in process on which bike next, and have decided firmly on one certain model only to change my mind. Fortunately I changed employers during this time so I had plently to keep me busy while I was bikeless.

    I'm heading to the Triumph dealer Tuesday for a test ride....stay tuned.
    #97
  18. motorat

    motorat TBD

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    went out looking for itersting things to take pictures of.
    #98
  19. IRideASlowBike

    IRideASlowBike Banned

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    Nice! What panniers are those? Tell us about your luggage setup.
    #99
  20. The Killstar

    The Killstar Ted Simon Acolyte

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    Thanks. They used to be made by Moto Sport Panniers, though they are out of the hard luggage game. How do I know this? Because I had to contact them for a replacement after my poor girl was T-boned on the way home from work Friday.
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