Full Size Pull behind RV thread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Tudelum48, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Bubwheat

    Bubwheat Long timer

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    I agree that Airstreams are very nice, but they're not for everyone. They are expensive, pretty fragile, (seen one after a hail storm?) have little' to no ground clearance (boondocking anyone?) and aren't really all that well insulated. And, yes I'd love one, but have found I could rationilized my way out of buyine one. :wink:
    #21
  2. Bubwheat

    Bubwheat Long timer

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    Agree with most of your post and would just point out that Nash and Arctic Fox and both made by Northwood Mfg. http://www.northwoodmfg.com/

    In your research, you'll find that a lot has changed in the RV market with the economic downturn, some brands are gone, some are made by other makers. But if you got some cash there are some pretty good deals out there. My 22H was listed at $28k and I paid $22k for it.
    #22
  3. RedRocker

    RedRocker Native Texican

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    Agreed, it's not wrong or unsafe, it's my opinion, we all have them and they differ sometimes.
    #23
  4. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    You are right, things have gotten real interesting in the world of RVs since the start of the depression. Nash makes some great stuff, and you got a decent deal on yours. Having bought four new ones so far, I try to end up with a discount in the high 20% range, off of true list. The fact that some orphan brands are now being made by the survivors is interesting. By the end of the boom, Fleetwood and coachmen were building absolutely shit towables. They both tanked, quickly. Hard to dump major amounts of cash on warranty work for the shit you built, if you aren't pumping new units out of the door, fast and furious. At the last Hershey show I looked at Coachmen towables. I ended up chatting with a long time upper management employee. She mentioned how they were now owned by Buffett (Forest River). After I noted the obvious improvement in quality, I asked, "So building garbage, heading into a collapse of the market, didn't work out real well, eh? She smiled and said that the last few years of the old company were hell. Pump garbage out, ASAP, and let the dealers and customers take the hit. Fleetwood OTOH was so pathetic that it's hard to believe that anybody wanted to even buy the naming rights. Good luck with your Nash, I'm sure it will last nearly forever with a bit of maintenance.
    #24
  5. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    Big difference between an opinion and a decade of heavy use that provides a deep base of knowledge. The "can't have too much truck" comment is a whole lot of testosterone that fails to add up in the real world. The average new towable buyer is a family with kids who will use the unit for a week long vacation and 6-8 weekend trips per year. They need a one ton diesel about as much as they need a Ferrari. A properly outfitted "half ton" pick-up can safely tow 6-8K trailers and be a usable family vehicle for the 95% of the time that it isn't towing anything. There is a reason that the hottest selling vehicle today is a 1/2 truck with a 400+ HP motor that gets low 20 MPGs when being used as a soocer mom, grocery chaser, yet tows 11K. I once fell for all the macho bull, and bought a four door superduty diesel. Biggest mistake ever. Great tow vehicle. Worthless for everyday life in the real world. Expensive to purchase, operate and maintain. It was also stunningly unreliable. The OP is looking for a modest Trailer and knowns what it takes to pull it. Had he started this thread as a retiree heading out for a lifetime of travel in a 18K, 38' fifth wheel, you would be correct, you need more truck.
    #25
  6. McB

    McB Joe 40 ouncer

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    FIL had a 5th wheel dually for several years, and liked it just fine for their lifestyle at the time, before my MIL got ill (she passed 3 years ago).

    Now, he and his new lady friend are getting back into travel, and downsized a bit. They bought an ultra light, 30' drag trailer with one slide, and an F-150 to pull it.

    The Ford is a crew cab, V-6 with tow package, and weight distributing hitch setup. The truck alone gets low-20s; and low to mid teens towing.

    So far, they towed it home a couple of hundred miles, another trip to Arkansas and back (300-ish each way), and then to south Texas for the winter. He said that other than being a bit more susceptiple to winds and long grades, it's working just fine for them.
    #26
  7. Laconic

    Laconic Anodyne

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    #27
  8. tony the tiger

    tony the tiger Long timer

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    :nod Looks like the model I've got is SV-235; or very similar layout. Freakin' rear slide... :baldy Gal we bought from was pulling it with a Tahoe...
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]:lol3 [/FONT]
    #28
  9. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    I guess it comes down to a lot of factors. I know that I've towed pretty close to the limit of the vehicle, and felt that I was, well, underpowered, and underbraked, even with trailer brakes.

    Doing this from time to time is OK, but I personally would not want to, on an ongoing, continuous basis [i.e. full time rving] want to use a tow vehicle that was at the high end of it's load limit. This is very much a personal decision.

    I'm not enough of an expert to say if a given vehicle tow rating is 'rational and reasonable', therefore I don't presume to gainsay the manufacturer's ratings.
    #29
  10. Solaros1

    Solaros1 Long timer

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    Check out www.fiberglassrv.com for a wide range of vintage and current trailers

    The Oliver trailers are very nice and a 17' Casita is a pretty nice rig.

    Some of the R-pod trailers I've seen have seemed like a good deal too - the 17' R-Pod is a nice rig for around $12K

    My sister has owned a bunch of trailers ranging from a 12' Serro Scotty to 23' Airstream to a 28' trailer (which is too big she says) and several others.

    They plan to scale back down to the 20'-22' size range but might even wind up with something a little smaller.

    I've had two 13' fiberglass trailers - nice size for small tow vehicles but I'd really like something in the 16'-17' range .
    #30
  11. RedRocker

    RedRocker Native Texican

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    Well, I have about three decades of heavy use for my "deep" base of knowledge and that's my opinion, your results may vary. Feel free to
    pull what ever you want with what ever you want, I don't care. OP asked for opinions, I gave mine, you don't have to agree, it's OK.:smooch

    I do have a friend towing with a new eco boost, nice truck, tows well, but gets about 11mpg towing his Jeep.
    #31
  12. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    #32
  13. Oshiat

    Oshiat Been here awhile

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    +1 on RV.net

    First order of business is that salesmen at RV lots will lie thru their teeth when it comes to what your rig is capable of towing.

    I have a 23' Eclipse Attitude toy hauler, fully loaded to capacity is 10,500lbs. These things get heavy fast. I would absolutely recommend staying away from the lightweight rigs. They are simply not structurally sound.

    Finally consider storage, we bought our trailer mainly because it fit the yard. Trailer storage fees run around $90 a month here.

    Welcome to the wonderful world of RVing!
    #33
  14. Snarky

    Snarky Vodka Infused.

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    Yeah lightweight sucks make sure you get something that exceeds your vehicle's capacity. :huh
    #34
  15. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    Been a member of rv.net for a decade now, and I guess I have to appologize for wasting your time. By now I really should know better. Actually, that site is full of dozens of your brethren. A serious poster asks a question about properly matching a reasonable truck with a trailer he is interested in. This is followed by pages of useful information and real world experience. Unfortunately, it is also tained by trash like, " I wouldn't use that half ton to pull anything bigger than a pop-up, you need a diesel, or you're gonna' kill your whole family". Absolute bullshit, but it will never end. So next time you pull a bike on a single rail trailer, for God's sake, please use a one ton diesel, chipped with all the emissions torn off, with a jake brake and be sure to have the 8" Chrome penis stack in the middle of the bed, belching black smoke. That 'ill get er' done :norton Safety first.
    Bottom line doesn't change however. The OP lists a truck that has been used by hundreds of thousands of owners in the last fourteen years to pull rigs in the 6-7K range. The reviews, and my personal experience of well over 100K tow miles with this combo, indicate that it is both safe and extremely reliable. You however, without a clue, decide jump in with your "opinion' that for safety it is best to limit this truck to a 2200lb micro trailer. Then waste time on subsequent posts explaining that your drivel is valid because it is your opinion? Sorry, as Yota once said, " A clue, you have not"

    Back to the OP and serious questions. The camplite is interesting, but I was suprised to see how they are built. Real stark interiors, sharp cabinets edges to gash your head on, and overall pretty crude. IMHO, the work and play haulers have a lot more to offer for the $. When you do narrow your search, be sure to get a few quotes from the wholesale sites, rvwholesalers, rvdirect, etc... these guys are frequently thousands below local dealers, and give you a bargaining tool if you want to buy locally. I would also think about ordering your hitch set-up and brake controller on-line, and doing the install yourself. Personally, I would want a Reese Dual Cam weight distribution and a Prodigy controller as a minimum. Frequently, dealers like to bundle a hitch and controller package into the deal. This usually doesn't end well. There is a lot of cheap Chinese shit out there, and the dealer makes a ton of money using it. Friction sway controllers and $59 inertia brake controllers are both shit that can get you in trouble in hairy conditions. They are also likely to be part of the $500 package that the dealer wants to install. The other benefit of doing the work yourself is that it gets done properly. You wouldn't believe how often the dealer will drop a box of parts in front of a $10/hr kid and tell him to go do the install on your new rig. Several times I have totally removed everything from friends or neighbors rigs and started again. This included everything from poorly adjusted spring bars to hitch receiver that was falling off of the tow vehicle!!! The brake controller is plug and play in your truck, you just need a $12 cord specific to your truck. the sway control/ weight distribution is pretty simple to install correctly. Once you do the install, and properly set the ride height on both vehicles, you will have learned a lot and have a few new tools as a bonus. Good luck on your new adventure.
    #35
  16. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    Hopefully the OP has a receiver and 7 way outlet included in the GM tow package. If so, a complete Reese hitch set-up with Dual-Cam sway control runs $444 plus shipping. A P2 can be had for $99 and the GM plug n' Play adapter is $11. The OP should be ready to roll with < $600 removed from the wallet and a few hours in the driveway. A few years ago I picked up a new rig in Buffalo, about 6 hours away. I installed a Dual Cam, in a hour or two, while laying in a snowy parking lot. It sucked, but it also saved $800 and I used the one I already had.
    #36
  17. RedRocker

    RedRocker Native Texican

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    I never said diesel, never said one ton, for trailers of the size the OP was talking about I'd prefer a 3/4 ton, with today's fuel prices I'd probably prefer a gas engine. 3/4 ton trucks have beefier axles and brakes, those are my preferences. Now, slide on over to RV.net where I'm sure you're a hero and they appreciate your "wisdom", cause I think you're an arrogant prick with low reading comprehension skills. :csm
    #37
  18. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    ^^^^^^^^ Me too, toured the factory last week............no particle board:huh, no old pallet grade lumber, no wood frames, no cheap paneling all those cheap poor grade materials are the RV industry standard.......:norton:norton

    The plumbing and electrical work on the under side is a work of art. The insides are a little industrial style but the new ones are much better. The windows were second to none.

    A friend is considering Camplite........ I was impressed........I have a Sprinter RV class C pulling a trailer:eek1 diesel :eek1:eek1..........
    #38
  19. PapaYolk

    PapaYolk happy camper

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    My wife was doing road shows at Costcos across the west and we got tired of hotels. So we bought a 30' travel trailer. It was quite a learning experience. We went with a cheap generic with slide. It was not winter rated so I wrapped all the waste pipe and water feed with heat tape, and made sure the water lines ran adjacent to the forced air duct. We went with an aluminum frame and siding to keep the loaded weight to around 8k. The water lines only froze once, camped on the Yellow Stone in Billings when it got down to -12 with the wind blowing.

    The thought of pulling something that weighed more than the pull vehicle did not appeal to me so we bought an 8k pull rig. We needed something to keep mom's jewelry and kit locked up in, and wanted the hitch as close to the axle as possible. Or pull rig worked great, never sways, has a built-in compressor that load levels, won't get pushed by the trailer when geared down on the down hills, had a trailer switch that changes the throttle response and shift to rpm ratio, 4wheel drive for the forest service roads and tight turning radius.. but. We did have one annoying problem.

    As soon as we drove off the lot, in Seattle, we noticed people flipping us off. Its been keyed twice. I've learned to check for the screws and nails that oddly appear propped under the tiers in parking lots. Yep.The only problem we had with the RV life was from buying a rig that was not PC enough for the brain dead, green zealots populating our country.

































    [​IMG]
    #39
  20. Bubwheat

    Bubwheat Long timer

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    Just a question, did they key the TT or the Hummer? :ear
    #40