Garages

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Seth S, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    It's cool that you can do that.

    To me, the computer drawing was always hard work. So I penciled ideas on paper first.

    Same with writing papers. Jot major ideas down on blank sheets, then an outline, then the word processor.
    #21
  2. Seth S

    Seth S Will _____ for _____

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    I still like to draw and I keep a sketch pad near when I am watching a movie or reading a book. I have used so many 3D design programs in the last 1o years for work or school that I tend to think freer using them.
    #22
  3. STFU

    STFU Found

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    My breif thoughts on what Ive read in this thread so far, and in comparison to my own "do it yourself" garage build that Im on year 5 of...

    Go bigger than you think you need, you will always want more space.

    Plenty of windows, but well though out becuase blank wall space is valuable too (try putting up storage shelves or stairs to that second floor on a wall full of windows).

    If you think there is even a slight chance you will want radiant heat, just put the tubes and manifold in now when you pour the floor, you cant go back and do it later... I wish I had and only skipped it because I was too cheap to spend the ~$500 on materials at the time.

    Plan where a car lift will go ahead of time and maybe dig a little deeper in that area for a thicker section of floor pad. (I did this). Mark it well on your plans so you dont forget exactly where it is 5 years later (I did this too :huh). Also route radiant tubes accordingly.

    I poured an "Alaskan Slab" here in NH and have had good results. I used a less conventional type of framing (pretty much avariation of a pole barn/ timber framed design with 6x6 lumber) It is stong and was easy to build.

    Not sure what you will use it for, but you mentioned heavy equipment. Go as big as possible with your overhead door. I have two 10x10 and at times wish they were bigger.

    Think of door placement in terms of how you will use the shop space. Will one central door work if you have a lift and want to use the other bay seperately? How about moving your doors off of the gable end to the side? really depends on the layout of your property. This can work to your advantage with low ceiling/wall heights and roof trusses when looking to put a car lift in.
    #23
  4. madeouttaglass

    madeouttaglass Awful Kanauphyl

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    If you are planning on any type of heat make sure to insulate under the slab. The idiots at our highway department thought they could save some money and didn't do it on their own heated slab. They ended up with a cold building and nicely heated outside perimeter before abandoning the system and having a forced air system installed.
    On my pole barn style garage (24x40) I have two 2.5x18x40' microlams to span for two 8x18 doors. I made the garage look smaller by setting it back a bit and putting the service door on the side. From the road the you'd think I have two 7x14 foot doors on a smaller building. Before I finished I also added a 12x20 bumpout in the back to hide the size some more.
    #24
  5. Shuffler

    Shuffler Hommes Grande

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    +1 on going bigger than you think you need ... and taller door(s) than you think you need ... and overhead storage / office / living space (or at least the option of building that in later)

    ... if this were my project, I'd add another garage door at the opposite end or on the side, to make 'drive-throughs' possible ... would make things easier with multiple projects/vehicles going on
    #25
  6. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

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    I built my shop a few years ago....for the lift that I wanted it needed 6" floor....check out the different lifts you are looking at so you know what you are going to need. And reguarding the lift, pay to have it installed, best money I spent. It took two guys a full day to get everything setup.

    With the tall roof the heat goes straight up, a fan will help move the air around. I have a 220v electric heater and use a portable propane heater on the real cold days.....I end up in a t-shirt after about 45minutes.

    I chose to not put any windows in my shop....I don't want everyone (not that anyone could see) to know what I have in there.....If I want light I open the ONE door. Double doors suck.

    A friend of mine asked for photos of mine....it is a bit of a mess at the moment but here is a quick 360 of my shop...there are a few things I would do different....but not much. If my darn compressor will ever die I will build a little "shack" on the side to hold a better one....the one I have works just fine...just had it when I was doing stuff out of the real garage and had to keep moving stuff around....not that I have a place for a good compressor I can get one....but just can't justify it to myself as long as the one I do have keeps on going.

    [​IMG]

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    #26
  7. bomber60015

    bomber60015 tikkun olam

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    I understand the desire for security in your shop . . . .and, in some locales, I'm sure that is a prime consideration . . . .

    For me, as much natural light as possible is right up there with enough room . . . . .I feel SOOOO much better with sunlight available . . . . . .

    If you live in an area that makes managing security important, skylights are a good option . . . . I've seen them fitting with bars (think jail) allowing light, but not bodies, to pass through.

    Living where I do makes that possible. .. .

    YMMV
    #27
  8. SRG

    SRG SRG

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    FPGT72's workshop/garage may work well for him and have been economical to build and own but that interior shows exactly why a design pro should be involved. It's a shame that your hostile surroundings require you to work in a military prison cell.

    Meeting physical requirements and purely practical enclosures do not a great building make.
    #28
  9. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    :lurk
    #29
  10. Dysco

    Dysco Diaper slinger

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    I used tube-type skylights in a small garage in a sketchy neighborhood. They provide more light than the floodlight I installed.
    #30
  11. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

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    I live out in the boonies, there really is no one around....13ac with my neighbors about 1/4 mile away in every direction....they even have keys to it. While I am in there I love it, don't know if in the pics it shows but it has 4 pretty big speakers and I have been known to get the place a-rockin :D

    But I just did not want the windows....for one thing I am a klutz and know I would bust them....but eveyone is right there is no such thing as too much light. I have 6 x 8' double tubes and that is not enough light...this summer I am adding more. The AC is also a little small for the space, I should have bought a little larger unit....I may add a second this summer as well.

    My son's bowflex took the spot for my tube bender, and I did have some stuff in there from the other barn....we also have a 40x60 that the tractors and such are stored in, and a 3 sided one that is about 30x40 for the disc, plow and that kind of stuff.

    The one thing I would remind you about skylights, or the clear pannels used on barns and such....they do crack, and leak....I had to pull all of them out of the big barn and just use regular lights.
    #31
  12. bigorangeking

    bigorangeking n00b

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  13. gkgeiger

    gkgeiger Every ride is an ADV

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    Here's my 32'X48' two story garage. It is a post construction with 6" walls. It has a 12/12 pitch roof and a 16X48 room on the second floor. I have a 100,000 BTU 40' radiant furnace hanging from the 14' high ceiling. I keep it at 50deg when not working out there and my gas bill is usually between $40 and $100.

    [​IMG]
    #33
  14. flyinfuzz

    flyinfuzz 2 Quarts low

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    Light ,light and more light. I have a 80 x 40 x 16 shop . 6 x6 post w/batt insulation metal skin 6' concrete floor with a 11,000 lb hoist. tall ceilings with hanging lights are ok but you will need lights lower along the wall or portable job lights. put in twice as many 110 plugs as you think you need, same with air outlets.
    plan a small office space with a door to keep dust and garage stuff from migrating into it. Put motion sensor lights or some switched lights so you don't have to turn on the overheads on a trip to grab something .
    I lined the lower sides w/ 1/2 chip board painted white to keep sparks and crap off the insulation.
    #34
  15. Doorguy1979

    Doorguy1979 Dreamridin'

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    Plan for the garage door, I know it seems insignificant, but with the style roof you seem to be using the side clearance gets tighter as you go up the wall, this will effect the amount of lift you can use. You'll want to use a lift clearance or high-lift door especially if you want to use a lift in there (have seen people raise a lift when the door was open and the door did not fair well).

    Buy the best garage door you can afford. Two sided steel doors are heavier insulated, stronger, and the light will reflect off the painted steel well and help with lighting. The money saved now on a cheap door will be lost in heat, and replacing it much sooner.

    Drive through shops are great, nothing worse than having to move 5 projects to get the mower out.

    No garage has enough outlets, ever :evil

    Very few garages have enough light, though lights high on the sidewalls are great for working of cars.

    If you are anything like me, you spend alot of time on the slab, under projects, heated slabs are a godsend, especially in January.
    #35
  16. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    Our garage is city-sized, not much bigger than the two cars. The one thing I've done that worked well was to line to walls (now all the way around) with 1/4" pegboard, with 4" shelves above. Now I have all the tools and "stuff" on the walls where I can find it.

    [​IMG]
    #36
  17. Colemanfu

    Colemanfu King of all manfu

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    Just in case your not appreciating your big garages I want to show you how the bottom feeders do it :D.
    [​IMG]
    I do have a workshop out back that the bikes live in but on the weekend I leave the ride of choice out in the carport :evil.
    #37
  18. DUNDERHEAD

    DUNDERHEAD Been here awhile

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    Jan 6, 2010
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    CT
    I suggest you visit someone with a garage that is heated with in-slab radiant heat. You know the feeling of coming home, cold from being outside, and standing over a nice warm woodstove ? AAHHHHH.
    Radiant is the only way to heat a garage !
    #38
  19. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    :tb

    THat's just awesome! Can we see the inside?
    #39
  20. gkgeiger

    gkgeiger Every ride is an ADV

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    Location:
    Akron, Ohio/ Naples Florida

    Here's a pic from a couple years ago. Too much stuff, need a bigger garage.


    [​IMG]
    #40