Gerbings Insoles - Anyone Use them?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by max384, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. max384

    max384 Bandaided

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,810
    Location:
    Hazleton, PA
    I'm thinking of buying a set of the Gerbings insoles. I have heated gloves and the rest of my gear keeps my body warm enough... But once it drops below freezing or so, my feet can only take about 45 minutes before they're cold enough that I've got to pull over to warm them up. I'm debating between getting heated socks or heated insoles. I'd much rather get the insoles for the convenience factor, though I'm sure the socks would keep me warmer.

    Does anyone here have any experience with the insoles? Good? Bad?
    #1
  2. PMC

    PMC riding rider

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,026
    Location:
    Twin Cities MN
    I just got a pair and while I used them once haven't tried them in really cold weather.
    In mid 40s I ran them on a low setting and my feet never felt cold. I have no doubt they'll be warm when the time comes (and it's coming soon).
    I was a little concerned the wires would be annoying but they hook up easy and I never thought about them after I geared up.

    I read that while walking in the socks you can feel the wires, that isn't an issue with the insoles.
    #2
  3. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 11, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,970
    Location:
    Spotsylvania, VA
    I have them and don't like them for a variety of reasons. I still use them because they are better than cold toes, but they are lacking in a number of respects:

    1. The wire is on the wrong side. For some reason, Gerbings put the cord in the pants to the outside and the cord for the insole on the inside. That means the thick cord has to cross your foot or calf. With snug boots, it really sucks. I don't understand why they did this.

    2. The insole is fairly thick so if your boot is properly snug without them, it will be very tight with them.

    3. It only heats the bottom of your feet. The top of my toes do get cold.

    When I got them, Gerbing has stopped making the socks. Shortly after buying them, they came back out with the socks and I wish I had them. If the cord in the pants were on the inside, I could live with the other problems but that really drives me nuts.
    #3
  4. max384

    max384 Bandaided

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,810
    Location:
    Hazleton, PA
    Good to hear. Thanks.

    I don't have heated pants, so I'd have to snake the wires up through my overpants, so that issue isn't really a big deal to me... But that is quite bizarre that they wouldn't have thought of that.

    How thick is the insole? I've read that elsewhere as well.

    That was my biggest worry. It's the same reason I went with heated gloves over heated grips. Although I would have much rather had the more convenient heated grips, rather than the PITA of plugging wires in, I ultimately decided the wrap around heating of gloves was a better investment. I'm glad I made that decision. I feel like debating between insoles and socks is very similar.
    #4
  5. meatwitheyes

    meatwitheyes Bon Vivant

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6,565
    Location:
    Eugene, Oregon
    I've not used the insoles so I have no input
    But I did try the "Warm and Safe" electric socks once and they are first rate.

    On another note the half a dozen times a year I need to heat my feet I just use the chemical toe warmers like the Grabber Toe Warmers or the Heatmax ToastiToes insole . They do an adequate job. I always carry a pair on my bike.

    Linky:
    http://www.rei.com/product/829213/grabber-toe-warmers-3-pairs

    .
    .
    #5
  6. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    26,543
    Location:
    Chicago-ish
    have you tried neoprene socks or toe covers . . . . they'll complete halt the wind, and will provide some insulation as well . . . . . .
    #6
  7. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 11, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,970
    Location:
    Spotsylvania, VA
    What about your boots? The cord for the socks will be above the level of your boot top and with the insole, it has to snake up to the top. If you have boots like the BMW All-Around, this isn't a big deal. If they are tight around your ankles, it is another matter. Also, do you leave your boots on to walk around much? If you change into walking shoes, the tightness and the cord are not a big deal.

    Again, the insoles don't keep the top of my toes warm, but that's not all that bad. The problem for me is cord management and comfort.
    #7
  8. max384

    max384 Bandaided

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,810
    Location:
    Hazleton, PA
    The chemical toe warmers would cost me more in the long run. I commute all winter five days a week (as long as the roads are clear of snow and ice, that is). It wouldn't take long for a heated insole/sock to pay for itself compared to chemical warmers.

    I actually just bought some nice Goretex boots that I had hoped would alleviate my cold toes problem I had with my old SMX-5s. They definitely help a lot, but even without the wind blowing in, my feet still get cold... It just takes a bit longer now.

    My boots are adjustable at the top, so I don't anticipate the cord being too much of a problem. I also change into shoes if I'm going to be doing any amount of walking around. Still, the cord management issue is something to keep in mind.

    How thick are the insoles? I have a little bit of extra room on top to play with in my new boots, but this is still a concern. I haven't been able to find an adequate picture online to see how thick they are compared to a typical insole, nor have I found specs on how thick they are.
    #8
  9. Armbar

    Armbar n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Max
    I have the heated insoles and they are the best. Go with them over the socks.
    #9
  10. John Smallberries

    John Smallberries Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,477
    Location:
    Northville, Michigan
    I believe mine are about 1/4" thick. They are thicker around the heel, but the overall "lift off the ground while wearing" factor looks to be 1/4"
    #10
  11. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    86
    I have both the heated socks and the insoles. I have found the heated socks will definitly keep your feet warmer than the insoles. I don't care for how tall the socks are and wish they were a bit thicker but they are still much better than the insoles.
    #11
  12. twasp

    twasp Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    43
    I have the insoles. They work well to add heat to your feet, but only add a small amount and are best used with insulated boots. The cords are an extra step to run up your pants legs. I also have the socks but have not used them yet. I would expect that both used together would be best.
    I do not find the insole thickness to be much more than a Dr Scolls work insole and they did not add much bulk or height to the boot for me. ymmv.
    They are the differance between cold feet and feet that are not cold, although not neccesarily (sp?) toasty warm.
    #12
  13. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,016
    Location:
    Bayou country
    After trying to "get by" with winter clothing--undergarments, jackets, pants, socks, gloves, etc., I bit the bullet and bought Gerbings Micro-wire gloves, jacket, pants AND socks.

    It works.

    It works like a dream.

    It works sooo well, that it really has to be below 40 degrees to make it worth putting it all on.

    If I need to ride in 40 degree temps or lower, I put the full Gerbings kit on.

    I have the dual controller, and that is also the way to go.

    Just buy the full kit and enjoy.

    My .02

    Cheers.

    If it's over 50 degrees, the Gerbings is too hot.

    This is on a V-Strom.
    #13
  14. '05Train

    '05Train Mind is not for rent

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,089
    Location:
    Maryland
    The insoles work great inside of an insulated boot. I've ridden for hours in single-digit temperatures and never had cold feet.
    #14
  15. max384

    max384 Bandaided

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,810
    Location:
    Hazleton, PA
    Thanks for all the input guys. I think I'll give the insoles a try.

    Thanks. That doesn't sound too bad. I believe I comfortably have that space in my boot.
    #15
  16. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,289
    Location:
    chicagoland
    This just in from another list that I subscribe to. If you have a sheepskin, try cutting some insoles from that. I have some sheepskin left over from a seat covering that I did using sheepskin from Ikea. So, I am going to try that. Depending on how that goes, I might try to make some booties if there is room.
    #16
  17. pklop

    pklop Motorcycle addict

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    349
    Location:
    Holland
    I like them. My boots have removable insoles. Because of this the gerbings insoles don't add (a lot of) height.
    I used the insoles below freezing temps and was comfortable with them.
    You do need a temp controller.

    I didn't like the feel of the wires in the socks that i also have.
    #17
  18. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander only happy when sad

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    8,298
    Location:
    Now only Montreal
    #18
  19. John Smallberries

    John Smallberries Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,477
    Location:
    Northville, Michigan
    I found my Warn-n-Safe heated pants and socks today stashed in my motorcycle camping dry bag! I definitely prefer them over the Gerbings insoles: no cramped toes, even heat all over my feet, no extra wires to fumble in the boots.

    My cold-weather gear is now just about sorted:
    - Warm-n-Safe pants and socks
    - Warm-n-Safe heated jacket, covered by a Columbia Omni-Heat fleece pull-over
    - Powerlet heated glove liners
    - neoprene fishing gloves (I know - I need a bit more protection.)
    - Warm-n-Safe dual wireless controller

    I rode in some nasty wind with our first snow today and was toasty-warm and dry, head to toes to fingers.
    #19