Getting into trials?

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Sting32, Mar 22, 2010.

?

Can we VOTE for a Sticky?

  1. Yes

  2. Nah

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  1. Iffykid

    Iffykid Long timer

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    Helmet is required it does not need be trials specific, First event I wore a MX helmet had I thought about it a regular open face helmet would have probably been better.
    Boots yep I wore my DS sport Alpine Scouts
    Menards Mechanix gloves.
    First event I fell over and landed on the only rock in a dirt hill and gouged my forearm open, During the lunch break I went back to the car and put on my pressure suit as I fall down a lot.
    Guess what I am saying is take your bike, helmet, and boots to a event and figure out the rest as you go.

    Pic of first event booboo:jack untitled.pngsherco1.png
  2. Iffykid

    Iffykid Long timer

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    Continued blabber.
    I went to my first event to spectate on a DS bike a club member(Don) offered to ride his spare bike I declined, This was Gilbert OHV about June/July last year.
    I think Don:bowknew that I didn't and mentored(held my hand) for the first few events I attended.:thumbup
    Asked questions watched for awhile and then started my search for a bike, I went to the next event with my newly acquired used bike(2nd) and clothed as in the above post.
    I have since purchased a Airoh helmet and Tech T boots once I started figuring out which things I wanted/needed still wearing MX pants and my pressure suite I still fall down a lot:fpalm
    As far as gear at club level you will see everything from full on wiz bang to shorts and a tshirt with most falling somewhere in between.
    The Mn club UMTA does most of there club rides either in Theilman or Gilbert OHV with joint club events in Mauston and Black River Falls. If I remember correctly as a UMTA member you can ride/practice at the Theilman grounds on non event days<bonus also around May/June they hold a practice day with club members helping each other to improve give pointers etc.
  3. heffergm

    heffergm Long timer

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    I think you mean gaffer tape...
  4. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Consider knee pads, too. I wear a pair of the 6-6-1 pads that harden on impact. Never tested them...yet. I've never ridden without trials boots mostly because my first pair of Gaerne Balance Pro-Tech boots I used for commuter duty. I wear a pair of MX pants that were on clearance (I believe they are Scott brand). You can get really sunburned in mid-summer so I wear a long sleeved rash-guard (meant for the pool). I only have to use sun lotion on my face and neck. You may not need a pressure suit but some elbow pads couldn't hurt. And, seriously consider a CamelBak. Even stopping once a loop, to drink, may not be enough to prevent dehydration. I use a CamelBak Rocket which is meant for cyclists. I believe it holds a quart or 1.5 quarts. That's plenty for one loop (I keep a gallon of water, on ice, in a cooler in the truck). It doesn't weigh much and you get used to wearing it pretty quickly.

    [​IMG]
    Harvey Krumpet and Tipmethewink like this.
  5. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer

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    I think your correct. It's my accent, I'm a Geordie. Soz.

    Bronco named a couple of my riding wardrobe staples.

    Hydration pack, for hydration, tools and muesli bars.

    Knee pads. I may just have unlucky knees but I bash them against the bike or the scenery, sometimes both, a lot. I have el cheapo velcro ones which work great. They stick firmly to the hairs on my knees.
  6. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile

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    Longtime rider and ADVrider member but always on dualsports. I am angling to get a used trials bike to help sharpen some skills that I can transfer to the trails.

    I have searched this thread to get some idea on how to establish a fair price for a used trials bike without much luck. How do these things depreciate? I have found a current model 2017 GasGas 250 local to me that - according to the seller - has "only been ridden in the driveway less than an hour." Seems like an online search reveals that most dealers are asking $5999 for MSRP - including his dealer's site. I have not yet gotten them to give an OTD cash price but will make contact soon.

    So... any advice for a trials noob on how to best figure out the fair market value on a trials bike?
  7. ADVCoop

    ADVCoop Long timer

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    Trials bikes do not seem to depreciate nearly as fast as dirt bikes.
  8. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    IMHO the only real trials related gear you have to have, are a helmet and boots. You can wear standard moto pants and jersey, or blue jeans and a t shirt if you prefer. For a cross over boot, I find the Sidi Discovery's are a good option, but there are others too. Any helmet can get you started, but trials helmets are lighter, cut differently in the back. Most are open face, but some people still prefer full face.
    That price must be for a GG Contact? A GG Pro, which is GG's normal trials bike is closer to $8K.
  9. LemmeTry

    LemmeTry Over-thinker...

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    Look for all sale ads on all trials bikes you can find. Craigslist, the marketplace here, Facebook, your local club, etc. To gain the best understanding of current used prices, I'd say the best way is to watch for several months and talk to other guys who are selling/buying. When buying or interested in an older bike especially, it can be helpful to post here for thoughts - e.g., just looking at sales posts, there are a lot of Honda Reflexs listed near $3,000 so finding one at $2400 may seem like a good deal, but if you read some of the comments here, you soon realize that the bike likely isn't worth even that. Newer bikes generally don't have as much of that going on, as long as they are in good condition. :)
  10. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the advice. It is a 2017 GasGas 250 Contact with a claimed less than two hours and it comes with a seat (not sure if OEM) and some spare parts. He wants $5k which is more than I want to spend on my first trials bike which will get abused I am sure. But it is the first one that is local to me and being new, it will likely not already be beaten up requiring more wrenching than riding. Still on the fence about it... I don't "need" it by any means.
  11. Champe

    Champe Been here awhile

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    Cheap. Buy it.

    The Gasgas Contact is one of the top entry level bikes. Being inexpensive is one of its great features. Most owners rave about them.

    If you want to compare hardware to what the top riders are on - forget about it. They are spending 8-10K. A good strategy for you is to buy the cheap Contact, beat the hell out of it, then get a top drawer trials bike when you get to intermediate level in a couple of years. The virtually new bike at the outset will help you focus on riding because maintenance will be very low.
    BossLady, wheelieman14 and jonnyc21 like this.
  12. ADVCoop

    ADVCoop Long timer

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    I pretty much agree with Champe. Just look at the guys that insist they need a cheap first bike, then have a 10 page thread full of questions trying to fix or keep their old bike running properly. I am not saying buy new, I didn't. But paying a little more for a well sorted bike is the way to go for a beginner in my opinion. That way you can concentrate on riding and not spending all of your time fixing and trying to find parts for a 15 year old bike that you found out wasn't in nearly as nice of shape as the seller told you it was.
    Norman Foley, jonnyc21 and LemmeTry like this.
  13. jonnyc21

    jonnyc21 Trials Ninja

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    FYI: the seat is OEM and comes with the 2017 contact stock.

    They are great bikes other than the tires. If it still has the Pirelli's they should be changed for at least a set of Dunlop 803 GP's. And if he is asking 5K instead of 5,999 then that would be a good deal if its only been run a few hours...
  14. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer

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    I have to chirp in. My Dad in Spain has a Contact and my mate down the road has one. My dad's is fully road legal, the seat and all the accompanying compliance's. They both love them.

    My mate down the road has spent many hours abusing himself on his and the bike has never missed a beat, and far more capable than us mortal trail riders. Not sure on the price but I back the bike 100%, if it's genuine 2 hours on the lawn.
  15. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile

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    Thats how i buy my DS and dirtbikes. Soend more upfront and then i can spend less time wrenching and more riding. Thanks for the advice on this one.

    sent from my phone with fat thumbs. please forgive my typos
    VxZeroKnots likes this.
  16. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    It is all relative I guess. If you don't mind working on your bikes, then maybe a less expensive bike is a good option? I for one was on a budget when I was shopping this spring and found my 2003 Gas Gas 280 TXT for cheap. It needed a little more work then I wanted, but is a solid bike after less then $60 of parts to re-jet the carb and buy new oil. I need to replace the fork seals, but that is not a hard task.

    I would have loved to have twice as much cash to spend at the time to get a newer bike, but it was either buy a less expensive older bike and get into trials this year or wait and buy a new one next spring. So to me it was worth it so I could start riding. Plus now things have changed where I am also going to be able to buy a new bike this fall. I have no regrets buying a cheaper bike which I will be able to loan to a friend or sell for more then I paid for it if I decide too at some point.

    It is all perspective I guess. I understand what you guys are saying about buy the best bike you can afford, but for some people the cheaper bike is the best they can afford.
    Norman Foley, 2whlrcr and lineaway like this.
  17. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Not to sound snide or pick a fight but this is exactly what we're saying. Besides, you should be intimate enough with your bike that you feel comfortable making repairs in the field. If a less expensive bike that requires a little work is what you can afford, great. 1 - you're getting into the sport and 2 - you have an opportunity to learn how to work on it. Win/win.
    1TRAK and jonnyc21 like this.
  18. ADVCoop

    ADVCoop Long timer

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    I was more commenting towards guys that buy a cheap bike that is a heap and they spend more time trying to get it running than getting to ride. Those guys should save longer and spend more in my opinion. I kind of made a blanket statement and I should not have because obviously that is not the case for everybody. But I speak from experience. My first bike was a 1992 Gas Gas GT25 that I bought for $500. The first time I rode with beatprojim from here that old GT25 wouldn't start. It was embarrassing because he even wasted time trying to bump start it and we lost valuable riding daylight. He loaned me one of his spare bikes and that convinced me I needed a newer bike LOL. I got lucky and found a new rear fender, I had to have fork bushings made because they were no longer available, and finally then after the above incident I got lucky and Lineaway from here had a CDI in his toolbox. Otherwise I would have been exactly what I said. A guy with a cheap bike that wouldn't work. I sold that asap once it was running and bought a much newer bike (the new owner knew every issue I had and he still wanted it). Trials is awesome unless you are spending all your time trying to get a pos to run. That is why I said what I did, I know the frustration of wanting to ride but spending all your time kicking a bike instead of riding it :-).
    Buschog likes this.
  19. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    Yeah for sure getting a bike that it a PITA to run is no fun. I had an early 70's Bultaco Pursang, that I got in 91 or so that barely ran, and as a kid not knowing much about bikes it was a total bummer. Man I wish I still had that bike now though. :-)

    I agree with you that it is better to buy a bike that does not require work and then have time to ride it instead of work on it. My situation is probably a little different as I spent $2400 so I guess that falls somewhere in between cheap and middle of the road. For the most part other then a few little things it is a solid bike for its age, and in pretty good shape.

    Funny part is that while I actually really like my bike, I still regret not spending more to get a newer bike. Mainly because finding parts for the older Gas Gas is more of a PITA. For some reason the Sherco's are calling me. In the end I will probably end up with several trials bikes so no worries.

    Thanks for your response.
    Buschog likes this.
  20. Two Foot

    Two Foot Adventurer

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    Hey all, Newby to trials question here. Another first bike question...sorry...I'm deployed right now and don't have access to a club for perspective. Thanks so much, in advance, for lending your experience to get me started.

    Background is, I rode desert in my 20s and now that the kids are riding, I found out how much I DONT know riding, esp cause of the Pacific NW trails. Always like doing slow technical stuff (even on a BMX) as well, and have decided to get a trials bike at least 34 separate times in the last probably 25 years. Well, now I have the funds and it's go-time.

    My objective is to learn ridiculous new skills that I can transfer to full-size, have fun playing in the backyard, and maybe do an occasional trials meet. I don't mind using the bike a lot for many years, and plan on it. Not one to baby a bike ever, but at the same time I've never thrashed one. My style is to get a rock-solid used bike and ride it for ages and ages until things wear out faster than I ride.

    I'd like to go with the $2k-2.5k route if those bikes would be reliable, but can go $4.5k if it will make that much of a difference. Has to make a reliability difference though. Super skeptical about loosing half the retail value in 5 years (i.e. 2010 gasgas vs 2005 gasgas). I'm not worried about the stuff I wear out, but I'm worried about either 1)the major stuff like bottom ends, or 2)a bazillion little things falling apart, which ends up being equivalent to a major problem. Below I've listed a couple craigslist ads I've been looking at as examples. My goal is to arrange something that will be ready to pick up when I get back. With that, the gasgas and shercos in the 2000-2007 model year range: do I need to worry about the bottom ends (I've heard an occasional mention about them -maybe- being a little "soft" side) or these bikes nickel and diming me to death instead of riding?

    https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/mcy/d/txt-gasgas-trials-bike/6210007609.html
    The 2000 gasgas looks fairly clean, owner said he hasn't rebuilt it, but did say it had a bazillion new parts on it. New stuff aside, it doesn't look that used. I'm trying to get a read on this bike, cause all these new parts mean one of two things: 1) The bike was crap and he had to replace that stuff to sell it or 2) He is one of those folks that wants a perfect machine, and replaced everything that was dinged. To me, I'm guessing the latter of the two on this one, the frame looks too good, what do you think?
    New Parts List: Front forks rebuilt – seals, dust covers, oil, new compression/rebound adjustment knobs,Front brake master cylinder rebuilt,Rear brakes rebuilt,New front sprocket, rear sprocket and chain,Replaced gas tank rubbers,New hoses,Added kickstand,Muffler redone and repacked,Exhaust gaskets and seals replaced,New chain protector and guide,New fan and motor, radiator cleaned, flushed and refilled. New cap,Electrical wiring rebuilt,New air cleaner connecting tube,New front number plate,New clutch cover,New gear shifter,New inlet manifold and carburetor gaskets.

    https://phoenix.craigslist.org/cph/mcy/d/trials-dirtbike-sherco/6162563502.html
    Here's another one in the same category, without all the new parts.

    I've been looking real hard at this 2006 Montesa 4rt, but, compared to the other bikes in the $2k range, is this bike worth the extra ponies????? (almost twice the price). I'm already leaning with the the 4rt because they have a very loyal following, and appear to be solid no matter how old they are (as long as I can get it started). Also, I get the feeling that for the bikes in the $4.5k range, the 4rt will hold its value a little better (or will it? with the new shipments coming in from Montesa???)
    https://flagstaff.craigslist.org/mcy/d/montessa-cota-trials-bike/6209331609.html

    A 2-stroke to compare to in the $4.5k range. No doubt this bike is taken care of. The owner sounds very particular, I'll leave it at that. If I went the $4.5k route it would be for reliability, not performance. Will I get more reliability out of the 4rt or this bike that's 6 years newer?
    https://denver.craigslist.org/mcy/d/gasgas-txt-pro/6213738038.html

    Overall, I would like to go with the $2.5k range as long as they're solid bikes. But, would go for the 4rt if it is like all the other Hondas I've owned over the years, and maybe consider the much newer gas gas if it will be as reliable. (but that bike is an extra day out of the way to pick up though).

    Apologies for the blabbering, and thanks again for the help!!

    Chris