Go Sportsters

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Bloodweiser, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yep, same here. I've always been a sport bike type, or at least a standard bike guy. Before the 48 my GS was the least sporty street bike I've ever owned. In fact, until just recently I just didn't get the whole H-D/cruiser thing at all. :puke1

    The forwards just felt really weird to me. I decided I'd give a try and see if I could get used to em, so I left em on my bike for a bit. And yeah, I did get used to them, but that doesn't change the fact that they are an inferior set-up for really riding a bike. All of your weight is on your ass, my hips were rotated to a weird angle that just didn't feel right, the reach to the relatively low and forward bars on the 48 made me feel like I was folded up like a taco and didn't feel right to my back, shoulders or arms. Combine that with the poor suspension and the fact that your ass is planted with no way of standing to use your legs to absorb the bigger hits, and it was just a receipt for a bad experience. And then there is the whole control issue too. Of course I can say that because I'm fortunate to not have long legs or bad knees. Everyone's preoccupation with a low seat height really does limit the ergonomic options with the typical cruiser platform. And that's not even considering the typical cruiser rider's concern with "looking cool"... :rofl

    But for me at least, the mids really help all of that. In fact, the crappy stock seat on the 48 and 72, that everyone bitches about is actually pretty comfortable once I swapped to the mids. Sorta like a Corbin or Sargent actually. Firm and sculpted into the "tractor" shape that fits my narrow ass pretty well. I do plan to add some highway pegs at some point just so I can shift positions occasionally, but I'll be selling the forward set-up since I can't ever see going back to it.

    The suspension is a relative easy fix. Cost is relative to just how well you want it "fixed". There are some cheap options out there and some people are happy with them. Just depends on your expectations, and what you hope to achieve. I'm going with Ohlins and they aren't exactly "cheap". But for me they are worth the extra. I firmly believe that with suspension, like so many other things in life, you get what you pay for and I'm willing to spend more to get more.

    Good luck getting the bike that suits your needs and getting it set up to your satisfaction.
  2. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I know what you mean. I'm not a "Harley rider". I am a motorcyclist that just happens to have a motorcycle made by Harley Davidson. Before seeing the 48 the first time I had no interest in anything H-D. Never did. It was actually just a fluke that I even went into the dealership in the first place. In fact, it was a customer's 48 sitting out front that originally peaked my curiosity. Then once I saw mine (or one like it at least), with the gold bass boat paint job.... :tb:raabia First H-D to even turn my head...

    I think some guys are hung up on the whole male ego thing too. Then again, size probably has a lot to do with it. I'm not a big guy. I'm about 5'7" and weigh a whopping 145ish pounds, so a Sportster fits me well. If I was 6'4" and topped 250, I'm sure I'd feel differently. Now, don't get me wrong... If they produced my bike with a big inch motor... :evil Or even if it came stock with a Buell top end and could be making close to 100hp, I'd be all over that! My Buell S1 does feel a good bit quicker. But I digress. They are different machines with different purposes in mind and I new that going in. I have faster bikes already. I really just wanted exactly what the Sportster offers. Or I will at least, once I get my NRHS filter on it, get the fueling right, and then get my suspension up to snuff.... Does it ever end?

    I sure hope not!! :lol3
  3. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    Allan Girdler, of Cycle World fame with his iron motor XR 750 at Daytona in the 90's. I raced against him several times with a 750 Ducati.
    The last time I talked with him , he said he was done with AHRMA because they changed the rules saying all bikes in F-750 had to run twin front discs and a fairing. He said his bike was never equiped with twin discs or a fairing ,though other versions on the 750 were , so he was out.
    To me it's just another case of AHRMA throwing the baby out with the bath water.
  4. Eye of the Tiger

    Eye of the Tiger Adventurer

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    Jan 12, 2013
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    While polishing the chrome for the first time ever, I just noticed that my Nightster has a little star wheel to tighten the throttle down for cruise control. I didn't even know what it was until I played with it a bit. ARRRRRRGGHH!!! I suppose I am pretty happy, but why didn't anybody tell me this before? I sure could have used that a few times. :D
  5. eliotsajerkface

    eliotsajerkface Been here awhile

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    It's pretty terrible though, almost unsafe. I guess on really long rides on straight flat roads it would be good.
  6. Eye of the Tiger

    Eye of the Tiger Adventurer

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    I'm going to ride I-95 down to Florida next week, so I'll test it out then. I imagine it will be tricky to keep the throttle at the intended position while tightening the wheel just enough to hold it.
  7. BobPS

    BobPS Been here awhile

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    I replaced the rear supspension of my Sportster (2002 Sportster) with Progressive 13.5" and the front spring with Progressive springs. Made the bike handles so much better.
  8. shunpiker

    shunpiker Adventurer

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    Mar 23, 2011
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    15
    They make a little lever that snaps on the "cruise control" star thingy so you can turn it on and off with the flip of your thumb. Makes it pretty functional.
  9. n8dawg6

    n8dawg6 krunkin'

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    MS
    honestly, I'm scared to use the damn thing. couldn't tell you if it worked or not. I figure if I got in a panic stop situation, it might cause confusion.
  10. Eye of the Tiger

    Eye of the Tiger Adventurer

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    Clutch in and ignore the engine bouncing off the rev limiter.
    It shouldn't be so tight that you can't twist the throttle back, either. Just tight enough to hold the return spring.
  11. gus

    gus Been here awhile

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    Almost all bikes used to have throttle tensioners. Sportsters have had them since they went to a quarter turn throttle in 1973.
  12. Eye of the Tiger

    Eye of the Tiger Adventurer

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    This is my first Harley, and the newest bike I've owned. If any of my old UJMs had throttle tensioners, I certainly didn't know about it.
  13. Scrivens

    Scrivens Been here awhile

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    usually the garage
    If you want to make it a lot sharper, raise the fork legs 1/2" up the triple-tree. Mine is an standard '07 - not a lowered one - and has the long RK rear shocks on. Raising the legs is common on VStroms for handling and stability issues, and I tried it on the Sporty more out of curiosity than anything. Works a treat and lightens the feel a lot. Takes about 5 minutes to do, can be done on the side stand, but (carefully) slacken the bolts only enough until the legs just start to move. Tighten the upper bolts first when the levels are correct, then bounce the front suspension a few times and tighten the lower bolts.
  14. DS Hobo

    DS Hobo Adventurer

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    Littleton, CO
    I had a 2000 883C before, but this bike I REALLY enjoy.

    [​IMG]
  15. BobPS

    BobPS Been here awhile

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    I only used (and always used) this throttle tensioner when warming up the bike. Mine was a carb'd Sportster and it always cough when cold. So, every time I started the bike, I turned this tensioner so the engine ran a at a higher rpm than idle, while I put on my jacket, helmet,and gloves. Once I was ready (about a minute), and the engine warm to the touch, I loosened the tensioner and ready to go.
  16. fastdadio

    fastdadio Still gettin faster

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    And to all you poor FF's that didn't jump on one when they were available, :katNeener-neener-neener! :lol3 :rofl :lol3
  17. fastdadio

    fastdadio Still gettin faster

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    I think all Sportsters have a tensioner. I keep mine set to a neutral tension. Easy to open and close. If I let go of the throttle, it will slowly vibrate closed and begin to slow down. Easy to adjust on the fly. Switching between my other bikes with a return spring, I don't even notice the difference. From a safety standpoint, whether you realize it or not, you always manually close your throttle anyway. Also, the Sportster has a bank angle sensor. Meaning, if it tips too far over it will cut out the ignition. So next time you FF's are out for a ride, play with it. I really like mine.
  18. shupe

    shupe Been here awhile

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    A little history: From the earliest days of twist grip throttles (before 1910), Harley throttles did not auto-close.
    They had a solid (not braided) wire inside the throttle cable housing that ran inside the handlebar.
    It pushed or pulled the carb butterfly open, and had to be twisted closed to close it. Otherwise the throttle stayed where it was. By the early 70's the carb had a light return spring but the friction of the solid cable, by design, was too much for the spring to close the throttle.
    In 1974 the Feds mandated self closing throttles (and left side shifters, right side rear brake), so H-D complied, but put in the tension screw and it's been there ever since. As stated, adjust it so it keeps the throttle from closing, but not so tight you can't over-ride it and twist the grip. You'll do so not only to close the throttle but the make minor speed adjustments.
  19. gusanito

    gusanito Mindless Wonderer

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    Jan 17, 2006
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    245

    Put an 18" on the back, replace the fork oil with 270ml of 20w and raise the forks .7".
    You'll be pleasantly surprised!! :evil
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Wow! Is that what that is? :huh And all this time I thought it was some sort of cable adjustment! I REALLY should read my owner's manual, huh?? :norton:deal

    But after reading this just now, I went out and played with it a bit... Just seems to make the throttle sticky and sorta notchy to me. I quickly turned it back the other way. IDK, maybe mine's defective or something, but it's not for me. :puke1

    :1drink