Go Sportsters

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Bloodweiser, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. jessemckay

    jessemckay twowheelin

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    on the road
    Here is the side view with new seat from Biltwell & 18" Sissy bar
    [​IMG]
  2. bdonley

    bdonley Been here awhile

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    I keep seeing bikes like this, and I'll have pull the batwing off and scrounge some lower bars. My first thought when I considered a Sportster was to cafe it.....
  3. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

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    I happen to know where a set of bars off of a 2002 sport are :)
  4. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    My forty eight with mid pegs.
  5. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I much prefer the feel of mine since I put the mids on it. Just got my new Sick Saddles solo seat installed this weekend too. Much better than stock!:D

    [​IMG]

    Have all the parts I need for the phase 1 suspension upgrades now. Just need time to get it all installed and sorted...

    Longer, Roadster length shocks for the rear (until I can afford to upgrade to Ohlins). Pulled the springs and powder coated them black this weekend. Longer Roadster damper rods, and Ricor Intiminators for the forks...

    [​IMG]

    Continue to be pleased with the front brake upgrade that I posted about earlier as well...


    :1drink
  6. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    DIdnt catch you on the front brake upgrade, did you get a brembo caliper?
  7. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Back on page 140, in THIS post.
  8. bdonley

    bdonley Been here awhile

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    I'd read about that upgrade. Gonna have to do that one. Way simpler then adding a caliper. Digging the bare bones look. Tried my bike without the batwing this weekend. Liked the feel. Just felt lighter. Bags may need to be stored also. Need to get some Nightster or standard bars to replace my low buckhorns......[​IMG]
  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Might want to take a look around over on xlforum to see how it will work on your bike. I know it works great with the 48's wheels, but I've read that it does present clearance issues with the wheels on some models. If it works on your bike it is definitely a worthwhile mod. While the brakes on my 48 may not rival those on some of my other bikes, I don't feel like the brakes are underpowered anymore. Much more confidence inspiring!

    :1drink
  10. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    aaa, yeah that one, its good?
  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Well, while I haven't compared it to other options, I'm very happy with it. It's a straight bolt on swap for the 48, works with the stock master cylinder, is relatively inexpensive, and substantially improves braking performance. I never feel the need for more than two fingers on the lever now, and I couldn't say that about the stock brakes.

    All you need is the caliper (it comes with pads already installed), two sealing washers, and a bottle of brake fluid. Easy peasy. Takes just minutes to swap the calipers. The only time consuming part is bleeding the system. That'd be easier if you also installed a speed bleeder on the caliper and run a hose back up to the master cylinder. Done that way all you have to do is crack the bleeder and keep pumping the lever while letting the fluid return back up to the master cylinder.

    I may upgrade the hose to SS braided lines later on, and if I do I'll install a speed bleeder then. But for now I'm pleased.


    :1drink
  12. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    Yeah the technical aspect is a piece of cake. though I think the stock caliper works fine too, I've thought about the brembo one. I have one of those vacuum bleeders you attach to an airline from my car days.

    You can also get a steering dampener for the forty eight.
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Well, IDK, but my stockker was woefully inadequate in my opinion. Perhaps yours is better, but it was the first thing that I did to my bike when I got it. I mean, yeah it "worked", in a '70s sort of way. But the lever effort was too high, and the feel and power was too low. If I'd never ridden a bike with powerful brakes before I guess I wouldn't have known better, but that's not the case and I like a bike with GOOD brakes. This bike didn't have that from the factory, IMO. It still doesn't rival a modern sport bikes, or even an older one, by any stretch of the imagination, but it is MUCH better, and entirely adequate for my needs. For a buck fifty it was well worth every penny. :deal

    I have a vacuum bleeder too, and used it when doing the swap. It does work much better than the old fashioned way, but you still have to keep topping off the fluid, and be careful to not suck the master cylinder dry while sucking the fluid out of the caliper. Ask me how I know! :huh:cry

    It took a good long time and a lot of refilling the reservoir, and dumping the vacuum pump container, doing it this way.

    That's the only real advantage to recirculating it... it just keeps the reservoir full while the air escapes, and lets you just keep pumping and pumping until you've gotten all the air out, while preventing absent minded screw ups.

    I don't feel the need for a steering damper on this bike. With the rather lazy steering geometry of these bikes, and unless one were to pretty radically change things up, I can't see that they'd be useful. In fact, IMO, and in most cases, for a street bike I sorta think of steering dampers as bandaid fixes for an improper suspension set-up. I don't ever plan to change the geometry enough, or push this bike hard enough to need one anyway.
  14. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    Heh, yeah those vacuum bleeders are fast. But for 150bucks the caliper change isnt that bad of an idea. Gotta find out what the calipers cost here. They also sell brembo kits that change both front and rear calipers, but its a bit more than 150.

    As for the sportsbikes, well yeah, no contest there, but still the forty eight with its big tires is quite nice to ride here, because the roads are in shit condition after winter. It still has pretty good pull, though it is underpowered and heavy compared to sportsbikes.
  15. theKite

    theKite Ulyssean

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    The brake mod looks good. Mine is a 1200 2004, and after riding the XR some years ago, mine feels distinctly under-braked!
    I was intending to fit a second brake disc/caliper as per XR.
    So the braking is much improved, Randy? Maybe this is all that I need to do.
    Rob
  16. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    But damn randy, your front disk has heated up, since its colored up.
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, it got that way bedding in the new pads. I subscribe to the "transfer pad material to the rotor" method. Got em a little hotter than anticipated, but all seems well now. :D
  18. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    "Much improved"? Yes, for sure. Of course that is a very subjective measure. The twin disc/caliper of the XR is, I'm sure vastly superior. But it would be a cheap experiment I guess. If the left side caliper will fit and work with your wheel, you could try it before adding the right side fork lower, disc and caliper. Then if your satisfied you've just saved yourself a bunch of dough and hassle. If not, then you've already got the left side caliper anyway.

    :1drink
  19. Tepi

    Tepi Been here awhile

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    As far as I know the XR forks are different to the XL forks.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yes, the XR forks are very different from the XL forks. In order to mount a right side caliper to an XL, you either have to do a complete front end swap, or in some cases just add a right side fork lower from a model that had a right side caliper, such as a Roadster. Several models with left side only brakes are compatible with the Roadster right side lower. Some, such as the 48, are not, due to the location of the fender mounting lugs. If, for example, you had a model that was compatible with the right side Roadster fork leg though, you could add just the left caliper from the XR, like I did. Then if you still wanted more, you could add the fork lower and the right side caliper, along with the necessary wheel mods to accept the rotor, as well as a new master cylinder that could pump enough fluid to actuate two 4 piston calipers. Doing the twin brake conversion can be a complicated and costly endeavor. :eek1 That's why I went with the upgrade that I did.

    All in all though, I accept some concessions to the fact that I have the bike I have. I wanted it for a different riding style, and with a few upgrades it'll do what I want it to do. If I wanted or needed top level performance a Sportster wouldn't have been the bike I would own.


    :1drink