Go Sportsters

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Bloodweiser, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. DutchVDub

    DutchVDub Adventurous Pirate

    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,433
    Location:
    Firestone, CO
    And you're using a KTM 525 fork/clamp setup?

    I don't think I'm going for that amount of travel. I just want to be able to run down fire roads and similarly maintained dirt roads, not go full off-roader with it.
  2. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,786
    Location:
    mena, Ar

    I'm using yz450 forks, with modified internals for the sportster weight.

    You do not need this level of suspension for normal fire roads. I believe a set of sport forks with internals revavled for scrambler work would be great. It would be a better scrambler than you can get from a factory.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. DutchVDub

    DutchVDub Adventurous Pirate

    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,433
    Location:
    Firestone, CO
    That sounds good to me. From my research the Sportster suspension just plain sucks all around. I know it'll need to be addressed for what I want. I also wouldn't have a problem with switching out the forks and/or triples as long as I can find something that'll work, be readily available, and not overly expensive.
  4. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,786
    Location:
    mena, Ar

    To make it work right you need to keep balance. So long travel forks mean a lot of work on the rear suspension. Not to just level the bike out, but to keep the travel balance, and keep the anti squat values in check with swingarm angle. If you have full length sportster fork the call Motocd.com and get him to sell you his new dualsport valves. He won't want to, but tell him I sent you and the Klr valves should work. If he needs a fork to test I'll send him I spare I have. I tried the new valves he designed and am very impressed. That would save you some coin and trouble. Just change the fork oil and drop in the valve. I'd help you in any way I can.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. DutchVDub

    DutchVDub Adventurous Pirate

    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,433
    Location:
    Firestone, CO
    Much appreciated. I have yet to buy a Sportster for this project so I don't know what forks I'll wind up with.

    I'm trying to find the cheapest 91 or newer 883 I can. I'm not overly worried if it runs or not either as I'm planning a 1250 swap, I just need the bottom end to be good.
  6. ADpete

    ADpete Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    359
    Location:
    Canbrerra Australia
    Since changing my wheels to 21" front and 17" rear with tkc80 tires I much more conferdent in the project. But an up coming rally may call for a river crossing. With a water depth of 12-18" (no deeper I hope ). The ride will be 9000km round trip. I have a choice between an 8 year old Kim 640 adv. or 2013 sportster (with wheels and tires ) .But if I take the sportster what areas need water proofing. Has any one ridden throw deep water with a sportster.
  7. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,639
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
  8. ishdishwishfish

    ishdishwishfish Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    322
    Location:
    Benton Harbor, MI
    One of the scrambler builds has a rear nissin master. I think either it's a pull action or he fabbed up a bracket like this:

    http://www.fabkevin.com/shop/brakes/remote-master-cylinder/

    I don't know what it'd take to hook it up to stock caliper if you want to take that route--thread pitch is 1mm if that helps. Fab Kevin also makes linkages, but they're way over priced also. I don't think it'd be that big a deal to find the dies to make them. bungking sells the heim joints and brake stays as well.

    Some guys have been relocating their masters up under the frame--I don't bother asking about it, I've derailed a guy's shop thread by posting my build. Either it sucked that bad or was so good he got pissed and stopped posting :lol3
    But they're probably using a cable bracket like the one I posted above. Oh and BTW I tried looking up what year sportster mag had the cush drive, ebay had one up for sale but it seems like XLforum and hog aren't that concerned, but I know they carry no weight here. :D
  9. DesertSurfer

    DesertSurfer Tail sprayin

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,884
    Location:
    City of the Angels
    Another route for the sporty

    [​IMG]
  10. DutchVDub

    DutchVDub Adventurous Pirate

    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,433
    Location:
    Firestone, CO
    That's a good looking ride, is that a Buell front on it?
  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,639
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Looks to be a modified XR1200.
  12. slowoldguy

    slowoldguy Tire Tester

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2004
    Oddometer:
    8,754
    Location:
    West of Waco, Texas
    That's a kit for the XR sold by Adrenalin. Jewel Racer.
  13. rodteague

    rodteague Enjoying the ride

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    690
    Location:
    Franklin,TN
    FWIW I installed Progressive springs in my 2002 sportster; used 7/8" spacer for preload. So far they have handled all the dirt, gravel and mud i have thrown at them. Simple installation and less than $100. Installing a set of valves as mentioned from various companies is another route. John and Randy have far more experience with these than I do( I have none as a matter of fact). I may eventually drop some Ricor Intiminators in to see how they pair with the progressive springs. This is a less costly alternative for rigid mount sporty's with out having to replace forks and triple tree's.

    Progressive springs

    Another option if you end up getting a "rubber mount" Sportster is the Progressive Cartridge mono tubes. First class suspension and you can use the stock forks. Would be more than enough for your application. Cost would be less than $250 if you shop around. This is a product that I wish I could have installed on my 2002. It will give you all the features of a 1200S front suspension; but with a lifetime warranty:D

    Progressive Mono Tube Fork Cartridge Kit



    Rod
  14. DesertSurfer

    DesertSurfer Tail sprayin

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,884
    Location:
    City of the Angels
    Ohlins suspension kit including rear shocks. Front brakes are the full floater kit. Bike was set up for previous owner at Bartels in Marina Del Rey although the XRCR bodywork was done directly through Jewel in France.
  15. B02S4

    B02S4 Aye

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,315
    I understand that Ricor generally recommends linear springs for use with Intiminators. That said, some do use progressive fork springs with 'em.
  16. bdonley

    bdonley Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    559
    Location:
    Central California coast
    That''s such a great looking bike..........
  17. rodteague

    rodteague Enjoying the ride

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    690
    Location:
    Franklin,TN
    When I spoke with a technician at Ricor they did recommend that I start with the stock springs. However, he did say they would probably work well with the Progressive springs. When speaking to progressive; they did not admit to any testing with the Ricor; but they did speak of another valve(the name escapes me at the moment) that they had worked with and it had performed well. I opted to start with the progressive rate springs and if I felt I needed something that would improve the suspension in rougher terrain I'd try the Ricor's. I keep things pretty slow on the back roads, so for now, the Progressives with the current preload setting are more than adequate.

    Rod
  18. BadKarma

    BadKarma Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    4,486
    Location:
    Rocky Mountains, USA
    Race-Tech Gold valves Rod, they make them for lots of applications.
  19. rodteague

    rodteague Enjoying the ride

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    690
    Location:
    Franklin,TN
    Thats it. I was at work and was thinking about it later but wasn't 100%. Bounced between Ricor and the Gold valves, heavily leaning towards the Ricors because of access.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,639
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    I bounced back and forth between the two as well. I read what I could and while I didn't find to much in the way of head to head comparisons, what I did find seemed to indicate the Ricors performed better.

    The Ricor Intiminators are a straight drop in too, whereas the Gold Valve Emuators require the bleed holes in the damper rods to be drilled out. At least in most applications. In my case that wouldn't have been a big deal since I had my forks completely apart to change out the damper rods anyway. But, if that wasn't the case, just draining the oil and dropping in the Intiminators would have made it much simpler.

    One possible advantage of the Emulators is that they are tuneable. Similar to the way a cartridge fork with external adjusters, only you have to remove the Emulators to make tuning adjustments if desired. I don't believe the Intiminators offer the same degree of owner adjustability. Then again, I'm not sure how essential this feature is for most riders.

    I can't say that I wouldn't have been happy with the Gold Valve Emulators too, but I can say that I can't imagine being more pleased with their performance than I am with my Intiminators.

    IMHO, good damping is the single most important thing to suspension performance, and the stock HD damping rod forks are horrible at it. :puke1

    The stock forks have a reputation for being too softly sprung. In my case, with the Ricors I found that the stock springs worked fine. I actually ended up cutting 2" from the free length of my springs. It seems that in their infinite wisdom, the engineers at HD decided to use a soft spring rate and then use massive amounts of spring preload to keep the forks from losing too much travel in static sag conditions. :huh In all my years I've never worked with a set of forks set up quite that way....

    In testing I'm using the majority of my fork travel while never bottoming. And by "testing" I mean trying my best to bottom the forks in road conditions. Like full-on panic braking over bumps etc. That's what good damping will give you... the ability to actually use the majority of your available travel without ever being harsh or completely bottoming the suspension. Just well controlled compliance that works like it should. If you aren't using up the majority of your travel in the worst conditions your bike sees then you are wasting some of your suspensions potential and putting up with excessively harsh action and reduced wheel control.

    IMO, the two things that holds the Sportster back the most is the suspension and the brakes. Coincidentally, that was the first two things I started working on with my bike. :deal I still want better shocks when funds allow, but that'll come way before I worry about spending any money trying to get more power from the engine.