Going for Broke: TAT 2011

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by simonpig, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    100 miles west of Memphis tn and my chain breaks. The chain was a standard non o ring chain, so I'm hoping my o ring masterlink will be ok as a replacement. First time this has happened to me. Not sure what would've caused it. Adjusted the chain after 500 miles but don't think I it was too tight?

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  2. rgon

    rgon explore cordilleras

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    many thanks simon. i love reading your adventure :clap

    rgon enjoying san miguel beer while reading your detailed report - from the philippines :freakymabuhay! (longlive)
  3. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    09/18/11 (The Final Day of the TAT proper)
    Daily mileage: Who gives a...
    Overall average: Who cares, at this point I don't...

    (WAY OVERDUE)

    Woke up and got a really late start on the day. Ooops, did it again. Was a bad boy and went past the 11:00am checkout time by like, half an hour. I blame it on this thread.

    With the anticipation of Port Orford and completion of this fantastic voyage, this mornings ride was frustrating in that I spent the rest of it and the early afternoon riding up mountains only to not be able to cross over because every road or reroute that I took led me to a dead end. This happened back to back consecutively at the beginning which took out a lot of time. I didn’t stop for lunch either and was subsisting on beef jerky and powerbars.

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    The trail ends abruptly in overgrowth. This happens more than once and I'm definitely NOT going in there.

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    After deciding I had had enough of chasing my tail, I decided to reroute farther along to mile marker 459 – around the railroad tracks. This took me around the side of a mountain on a rocky trail that was chock full of fallen trees, it was obvious this was the right path from the minimal clearings made which allowed a motorcycle to pass. It was a tight squeeze at points which adds to the anxiety level as I continued on. If there as a new tree that was downed the path would be cut short and I would need to backtrack, wasting more time and fuel.

    At one point there was a fork in the road, and I took a left but had to turn around to take the right, didn’t waste too much time, but was still vexing. Did I mention earlier, I wanted to make it to Port Orford at a decent hour to enjoy the beach, et cetera. If so, that was the theme of the day.

    After getting past that trail, the rest of the ride was weaving around forest roads that were bigger. There would be more reroutes due to a road being shut down by a lumber company. The landscape wasn’t even really that nice since deforestation was taking place. I remember the vegetation next to the road taking on this greyish green color and upon closer inspection, determined that it was the dust coming off the gravel roads and sticking.

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    At one point I come around a corner hauling tail and see a metal fence which induced a long skidmark… on the road. My pants were fine. Chicks and Dudes who like hauling… be careful in Oregon. You have a good chance of winning a headbutt with a barb wire fence, but a metal post will win most everytime.

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    After rerouting several times and depleting fuel, I needed to go north of the trail to Powers, Oregon to gas up. At this point, it was my intention to get the gas, and let the GPS take over to put me on a major road to Port Orford. It was around 5:15 and I had no time to waste if I was to enjoy the setting sun on the ocean.

    Arriving in Powers, I pull up to the gas station after a few minutes of wondering if it was open or not, was greeted by the young attendent who asked if I was with the “other guy” on the WRR that stopped in an hour earlier. Apparently, I have been shadowing another TAT rider who was not too far from me. The attendant was into dirt bikes and owned several bikes (xr’s) and spoke of aspirations for riding to South America. He was super friendly and helpful and told me of the quick way to get to the coast. This was the same route he pointed out to the aforementioned WRR shadow rider. I was to take Salmon Creek Rd which turns into Sixes River Road straight to the coast and head south. It cuts the trip in half and is mostly fast sweeping gravel. Really good ride actually, and the most fun I’ve can remember riding in Oregon.

    My thoughts as I blasted down the gravel road through the forest was that if the guy ahead is slower and doesn’t have a GPS, maybe I can catch him. Would that not be super lovin awesome? I was pushing and pushing and eventually, I hit the coast highway around 6:15. Rolling into Port Orford, I see a WRR waiting to pull out of a gas station and I know its my shadow. I pull up to greet him, and tell him I was tailing him on the TAT. His name if Zach and it turns out he was actually 2 hours ahead at the gas stop and had arrived around 4:30 and was doing laundry. He mentioned also being lost this morning and having the same idea I did of just trying to complete this thing. We exchange some trip details. Before parting ways and well wishes, I snap a portrait.

    The TAT really gets you ripped. See Zach flex those biceps.

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    I head to the beach, and per Zach’s info, I find the the dropoff onto the beach itself.

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    As soon as I hit the soft sand, my rear digs in and I am stuck. Having a look at my tire, there was no way, I was doing a victory lap on that bald mother. Oh well, unless one manages their tire changes, the victory lap will or will not happen.

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    I get off and walk down to the water and enjoy the sunset. It was foggy, but the light from the setting sun cast a nice color on the clouds. Thanks for the following. My TAT trip proper comes to an end.

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    My lodging for the evening... Castaway By The Sea. Very nice apartment.

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    The rest of the trip is less offroad ride oriented, so not really sure if its relevant to continue on the daily post model as implement previously.


    Observation:
    Though time consuming, I think it’s really nice that I was able to semi-live report this. Without this thread it would’ve been a more lonesome ride. A man can go crazy with his own thoughts, don't cha know? Thanks for following along.
  4. SR1

    SR1 Back in S. Korea

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    Nice trip, followed you the whole way.

    You said the rest of the trip isn't as offroad oriented. What did you do on the return? I am questioning the same thing, as I am an East Coaster as well.
  5. Bleary

    Bleary Adventurer

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    Yeah, Simon, what he said... how are you planning to return?
  6. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    I am in Mississippi now on my way back to NY.

    The short of it is that I rode down to San Francisco and saw some friends I hadn't seen in awhile.

    And then I rode down the PCH to Los Angeles, saw some friends and had a great time soaking in the Socal vibes. Partied some... ok maybe alot.

    Then I rode over to Las Vegas and took in the lights.

    And then I rode the interstate through NM, TX, and OK, and here I am, MS.

    I may continue an abbreviated post and pictures from each of the days or combination of day... maybe continue the second part of the trip Going for Broke, p.II: The Prodigal Son Returns.

    I thought about shipping the bike back early on, but decided the time on the road is nice in letting the TAT and the west coast experience set in.

  7. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    Thanks for the rave reviews. There was several times there where I started to pull out the extra tall soapbox and then I thought better of it.

    The photos are straight from the camera. I made an incamera adjustment to vivid saturation since thats what I like.

  8. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    The WR can do interstate miles two guys i rode with rode fro Houston to the start, then at the finish one rode to Houston the other went on up to Canada to see his mother, then rode home. He had a total of 10,000 miles on the bike. WR's can do it, but comfort might not be the best. If you ride back you'll have the satisfaction of knowing you did the complete ride and didn't wimp out and ship the bike home!!! It was more difficult on the mind and body riding the intertstae home. Well at least for me as I was hauling ass getting home. Well as much as one can at 62 miles mph on the highway!! Feels like hauling ass on a DRZ. It's rough on ya, but hey what's a little pain, earns you bragging rights!!!
  9. philsb

    philsb Gentleman of Leisure

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    Doncaster, UK
    I've enjoyed your report immensely. I do envy you Yanks with all the tremendous off-road biking opportunities, we seem to have little here in the UK.

    Best regards
    Phil
  10. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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  11. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    Thanks for following.

    Really? You guys can't go rippin' in the glens. Or thrashing through grottos. You do have close access to all of Europe, Africa, and Asia though, so I'm not feelin' very sorry for ya. :deal

  12. meijer's trails

    meijer's trails Been here awhile

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  13. killurtv

    killurtv free range moron

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    central oregon
    Nice job!! Excellent report and pictures. I ran into Zach in Denio, great to see that he made it as well.:clap
  14. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    Mabuhay! x 2, Rgon. Hold it down for us in the philippines.

  15. fotobo

    fotobo KTM rider

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    Great job on the Ride Report. Thanks for all the entertainment. I looked forward to reading it each day.

    Looks like you are close to being home. Glad you made it ok. Sorry I wasn't home when you came through. It would have been good to see you again and share a beer with you. Maybe another time.

    I thought later that I should have asked you to come down to the enduro, but it would have added a couple hundred miles to your trip and I bet you were anxious to get home by then.

    Again congratulations!
  16. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    "Also, I busted my campfire-starting-cherry. I had a tough time of it. I thought I was doing something wrong, but after several hours, I could tell that the wood was moist since it was smoking and evaporating the water from the cut end as it burned down. It really didn’t burn well at all, I had to blow on it every 5 minutes to keep an actual fire going.

    If any of you hippies or manscouts out there could give me advice on doing it the right way, I would appreciate it. "

    I didn't notice anyone chiming in on your question so here's some things I try to do for a good camp fire. If there's not a fire ring already made,I'll gather some stones to build one-building it larger in the back to reflect the heat. I like to think of the process a going from small to big,and I even like to separate my wood into piles that reflect that. You need something to use a s a fire starter. I often buy beer just before I camp and ask for brown paper bags to carry it in. I rip them up in little strips,or will use Birch tree bark if I can find some.You can also whittle some from a dry branch. Then I make a teepee style set up with very small/skinny twiggy material-if it snaps as I brake it up it should be dry enough (stuff without bark works best). At that point I light it SLOWLY feeding it small stuff,then just a little bigger every now and then. Once I get a good consistent flame,I add just little bits,always allowing air to get up under the pieces I just laid on to the fire. After about 5 minutes I'll then add stuff just a bit thicker than my thumb,and slowly get a medium sized piece in there every once in a while.
    You need that good bit of hot coals to be burning for a bit before you attempt to use big pieces like I saw in your picture. Dry wood is key,and anything you can find around the water-drift wood works great also. Hope you get some nice camp fires going,it's often my favorite of the day. Cheers

    Woops,didn't realize you've completed the trip,I'm only on page 6-good stuff.
  17. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    Don't know what's up but I keep loosing my chain. The only difference when changing out the sprocket was going from o ring to non o ring chain. Also when from 48 tooth to 50 tooth. Seem strange going up in the rear but when I get back I wanted to be able to improve single trackability. I notice the chain has less clearance to the chain guard and this maybe knocking the clip off? Ordered an o ring chain and 48 t sprocket. In the meantime. Hanging out at the dickson inn in tennessee.

    Anyone having problems with 50t rear sprockets on this bike?

    Was actually really lucky in that I rolled to a stop at exit 172 on i40. It was dusk and I walked back looking for the chain but to no avail. Rolled the bike up the exit to the Dickson inn and suites.

    Woke up this morning and walked the interstate to see if I could find the chain. No dice. It's just vanished into thin air.
  18. simonpig

    simonpig packin' heat

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    Thanks and no worries. Shoulda let you know my whereabouts earlier. I'm learning lots about planning ahead anticipation on this trip.
  19. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    Bowling Green, Ky
    I busted my chain, but the chain was too tight and got into the counter shaft sprocket wore it away to pointy teeth the chain came off and then wedged between the case then broke.

    Is your counter shaft sprocket good and chain have the right amount of slack????

    Have a mechanic double check chain tension. Load up the suspension and check when counter shaft sprocket, swing arm pivot and rear axle are all lined up.


    0-----------0---------------0
    CS.......... Swing............... rear
    .................arm................. axle
  20. rufus

    rufus We're burning daylight...

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    A bigger rear sprocket can cause problems. You may need to run your chain a little looser. If the chain doesn't have a straight shot through the chain guide but instead takes a bend downward it could reduce the amount of slack you need for suspension movement. This could put stress on the chain and cause it to wear faster and possibly break. not enough slack can also wear out wheel bearings and transmission bearings. When the countershaft, swingarm pivot bolt, and the rear axle centerlines are all lined up, this is the point at which most chains are their tightest. You should still have a little slack left. Lean over the seat and grab the swingarm and pull down until all 3 are inline. if the chain is tight like a guitar string you will have problems.

    OR..........your chain guide might be bent. Lay down on your belly and eyeball along the side of the rear sprocket and see if the chain guide is lined up properly.