Got a nice knife? Let's see it.

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Sniper X, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. Smithy

    Smithy Avoiding the Skid-Demon

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    Now you're putting words in my mouth. I wasn't calling anyone out in particular, so please don't take offense where none was intended.

    My knife steels of choice are primarily 1095, 1084, W1 and W2, occasionally O1, and sometimes some 15n20. I have also used 52100, 5160, I have a hunk of O6 for tool making, and some A2 I have yet to decide what to do with. for my historical work I end up making my own steels, either from carburized wrought iron, or smelted material direct from ore in most cases. I'm experimenting with recycling material into an orishigane-type product using an Aristotle furnace, and also have played around with high-nickel iron meteorite (campo).

    My personal experience with variable product under a single spec is 1095. The stuff I get from Admiral steel is not annealed, and has massive alloy banding present in almost every purchase. I have changed suppliers to Aldo Bruno (the New Jersey Steel Baron) and his material is clean, well-annealed, and is ready to work, with no additional thermal cycling needed before it's "ready" for knife making. Even then, I know people who got a batch from him, and found inclusions, banding, or other flaws, and the product was replaced immediately - so his customer service carries some weight, but my main decision to use him comes from the nature of the steel as delivered, which is excellent for my purposes and techniques. I don't pretend to know about everything that goes on in a steel mill, but I know the end product can be rather varied depending on the quality controls in place, and the method by which the final bars are made.
  2. KingRat

    KingRat Stroppy.

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    No you aren't...
  3. bmwktmbill

    bmwktmbill Traveler

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    Oh cool...knife fight.
    b
  4. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    I say the same, no offense intended.

    When I read you post it seemed you were having a bad day with your supplier. Bear in mind you are buying a very plain, low end product, 1095. Steel is a very difficult thing to make. Even the best made steel can fail. If you were buying a mills top of the line product, or the majority of its capicity, you may get a better product and more attention when a bad lot is found.

    Steel mills also hold all Aces. As a manufacturer you have no choice but to buy what they make, good or bad. Although there are mountian high piles of specifications most count on in house QA to keep good raw material in their products and simply get creidt less scrap value from the mills for the rejects.

    I guess you use 1095 for its vintage authentic quality? It is of interest to me you make your own steels.

    I have made some knifes and posted photos here but my strong suit is heat treatment. I hope to be of some assistance to you sometime.
  5. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    On what basis do you make that statement?
  6. earwig

    earwig Crowbar of Embrayage

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    I actually believe you're not trying to be a prick.

    You just really are one.
  7. Smithy

    Smithy Avoiding the Skid-Demon

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    I do not equate "plain" with "low end". I prefer simple steels, because they are easy for a hobby smith to do a quality heat-treatment with. I prefer 1095 because if I want, I can use clay to get a really nice hamon. 1075 is also a good choice if you want to be on the other side of the eutectic line... but I also want the additional carbon for maximum hardness. There are a lot of high-quality production knives being made with 1095, and while it's not in the same class as some of the modern super-steels, it's much more forgiving and approachable with minimal equipment.
  8. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    I have an interest in working in some of those "super steels" -- I have a friend who's tight in the restaurant scene locally, and we've been talking about high-end, bespoke kitchen knives -- and am filled with dread over the heat treatment.

    I was relieved to find a vendor that accepts "onesy-twosey" HT work from individuals -- presumably, they take it and hold it until they have a full batch, then fill their oven.

    They also do cryo, which superficially sounded like hokum, but after a bit of research, does seem to add some desirable qualities.

    Oh, and I really like working with A2, the HT doesn't intimidate me at all, and I love the edge it holds. But it rusts.
  9. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

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    Leatherman 33 Crater.

    Made in the USA, excellent quality with a very sharp edge. Use it at work all the time. Can't believe Mountain Equipment Co-op sells them for $15. :huh


    [​IMG]
  10. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    Pretty funny.
  11. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    If you ever need any information on heat treatment, contact me.

    See our web site: http://www.specialtyheattreat.com/
  12. Laconic

    Laconic Anodyne

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    Nice. The blade is the exact shape I like for daily use.
  13. Sam Buca

    Sam Buca a.k.a. Daniel

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    ... and the carabiner acts as a beer bottle opener :1drink


    .
  14. wannaklr

    wannaklr Long timer

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    Hey,

    I have that knife, but mine has a serrated edge near the hinge, and c33x written on it near the hinge. Great little all-around pocket knife. And beer bottle opener. :lol3
  15. lilsmokey

    lilsmokey Been here awhile

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    Here are my cheapest crappiest knives. Thats why they spend their life in my truck. As well as a Machete and a swiss army knife.

    Big one cost $26, little gerber cost $20? found the black one in the forrest and the last one i got from my uncle.
    [​IMG]
  16. KingRat

    KingRat Stroppy.

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    :rolleyes

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hnTmBjk-M0c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  17. Smithy

    Smithy Avoiding the Skid-Demon

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    I'm trying to take your logo seriously, and not see the word "shit".

    [​IMG]

    :lol3

    In all fairness, I'm sure you're good at what you do. I would contend, however, that heat treatment in thin sections like knives is vastly different than the industrial dimensions you're working with. While the chemistry may be the same, the dynamics of heating and cooling times in a knife cross-section, where the surface area:volume ratio is much different than the structural-looking examples on your website.

    We've got a few professional metallurgists in our midst, and a wealth of practical experience heat treating knives. I'm quite comfortable with what I know and my current process, thanks.
  18. tony the tiger

    tony the tiger Long timer

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    :webers my thought exactly, Watson.:freaky
  19. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    Your assuming we don't dont run small parts and we don't have experienced heat treaters that don't have experience processing heart valves, gun parts, knifes, swords, and a long list of critical compoents.

    Considering I was one of the peolpe that built our company up from a two car garage operation to what we are today, you comments regarding our name is not appriciated.

    Please stay in your little world of smoke and mirrors convinced your way is best and that no one else has a clue.
  20. Phat

    Phat Banned

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    Always have to try and get the last word don't you? Smithy is a respected contributor of this thread. You.....not so much. Have a nice day.. BTW....Smithy spells words better than you.