Got a nice knife? Let's see it.

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Sniper X, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. Nerfin

    Nerfin An Adventure thats Knarly

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    242
    Location:
    Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
    I recently inherited these (the clasp knife if 70 yrs old, the scout around 65 yrs old). They were tucked away in a metal tool box and left for many years; forgotten, dirty, rusted, bent, chipped but not broken. I know they were well used and loved and I will continue to carry and use them with pride. Thank you EG for your gifts, your memory lives on, rest in peace my friend.

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  2. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
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    7,070
    Location:
    Cin City, OH
    I have possibly the same knife as the Boy Scout one, also made by Imperial in RI. Mine has an additional small blade which yours probably does, just can't see it. No BS emblem though. It's in a little better shape than yours, similar in age, was my grandparents and I'd seen it since I was a small child.

    Surprising how sharp those old carbon steel blades are. Blades still close with a satisfying snap. Just for the hell of it, I recently used the can opener blade, worked just fine once I got the hang of it. Wish it had a cork screw, then I'd be ready for the apocalypse. :lol3
  3. Nerfin

    Nerfin An Adventure thats Knarly

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
    Lol! Yup, very sharp blade on the scout after some work with the sharpmaker. Slide through the apple like a razor. It has an awl as well, which was broken at the tip, so I re-profiled it and it works just fine, I just didn't get a pic. A cork screw would finish that knife off amazingly well!

    The British clasp knife is a beast of a folder made in 1944. That's the one I would choose for the apocalypse :D....come to think of it I am sure the soldier it was used by thought the same thing in WWII. The springs are wickedly strong, opening and closing. The blade needed to be re-profiled as well since it had a chip out of the tip. It sharpened up really well on the sharpmaker too.

    These two are user knives and I am sure will last another 70 yrs!

    Cheers.
  4. Sam Buca

    Sam Buca a.k.a. Daniel

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,898
    Location:
    Simi Valley, CA
    The clasp knife would not have gone to a soldier, but rather to a mariner or a sailor. The spike is a Marlin Spike used for rope work or to tighten/loosen shackles. The blade is deliberately of sheepsfoot design to prevent you from stabbing yourself on a rolling boat.

    These knives were typically issued to sailors and some of my friends in the navy received these as standard issue as recent as 1975.


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  5. Fire Escape

    Fire Escape Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
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    Location:
    Epsom, NH

    Knives having no 'point' is a very old nautical tradition. The idea of not stabbing yourself on a rolling boat is true but not stabbing anyone else was also a consideration. I have read that it was common for the first mate on a whaling ship to break the point off each man's knife as they came aboard to help 'keep peace' on the long voyages. The straight edge of a sheepsfoot blade is very useful in rope work. The cleanest way to cut natural fiber rope (all they used to have) is to set the blade on the rope and tap it through, often with a wooden mallet or perhaps a belaying pin rather than 'saw' at it using just the knife.

    Bruce
  6. Nerfin

    Nerfin An Adventure thats Knarly

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    242
    Location:
    Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
    Thanks for the info about the clasp knife, Fire Escape and Sam. I can tell you that it takes a firm grip to open the blade and can opener...the spike is a bit easier although it is built such that two springs keep it firmly open and closed. Wish I knew more about the history of this clasp knife. The screw driver near the tip of the spike is a neat feature as well.
  7. Stratlanta

    Stratlanta Flabby Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    205
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    Love those Nerfin - really cool. Hoping that my kids will get some of mine some day and have good stories to tell about them. Here's my latest:

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  8. Smithy

    Smithy Avoiding the Skid-Demon

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
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    One in the works...

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    Forged tonight from a 1" ball bearing, like the one shown. Let's see a grinder jockey do that. :deal
  9. Nerfin

    Nerfin An Adventure thats Knarly

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    242
    Location:
    Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
    Your kids would be lucky indeed! That's a beautiful knife Stratlanta, love that blade shape and the stag handle looks amazing.
  10. BMWrider79

    BMWrider79 Here

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    818
    Location:
    Japan
    I got mine in '86 aboard the USS Aubry Fitch. It is still in my seabag with my dungarees in my father's attic.
  11. clevishook

    clevishook stevedore

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
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    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Had the knife with the marlin spike as part of my military tool kit.
  12. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    I'm really liking that shape!
  13. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Long timer

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    May 2, 2006
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    Location:
    Banjoland
    I like this knife, what is the forked tool for?


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  14. Marco Moto

    Marco Moto Voyager

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    Nov 14, 2008
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    It's a can opener.
  15. Laromonster

    Laromonster Vesperado !

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    Jun 28, 2004
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    Location:
    Sviland
    Nope, its for sail stitch removal
  16. Ayrshire Bull

    Ayrshire Bull why the hell not?

    Joined:
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    Location:
    The Left Coast, B.C., CA-NA-DA
    Nope - it's a Canadian knife.

    It's for gutting baby seals.
  17. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Banned

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  18. bmwktmbill

    bmwktmbill Traveler

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    Laro is never wrong.
    He is one to keep your eye on.

    b
  19. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    Jul 26, 2001
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    Yup - I haven't seen one since I left the USCG in '81 - they were still a standard tool. They also used a number of other purpose built fids, but every coxswain and BM had a knife like that in their pocket. I was an MK so I used a screwdriver. ;)
  20. Marco Moto

    Marco Moto Voyager

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
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    Location:
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    I stand corrected.

    Still, You could probably use it as a can opener :D.