GS850 Fix-up

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Triam, Jul 4, 2013.

  1. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    Do you mean the shims or the buckets themselves?
    #21
  2. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    Where the cam lobes contact.
    #22
  3. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    [​IMG]

    They looked a bit worn, but I measured them all with micrometers to verify that they were the thickness they claimed to be and they weren't worn down more than .01 or .02 MM
    #23
  4. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    I'd put the cams back in and start it with the cam cover off to see if you get oil to the top , for a start. If so then check your valve clearances. The valves usually get tight , more so when hot.
    #24
  5. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    K. I'll do that next. I should warn you that it may take a week or two for me to find time again to work on it.
    #25
  6. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    You don't want to be in a hurry anyway. Take your time.:thumb
    #26
  7. Andyinhilo

    Andyinhilo Long timer

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    The flow switch (measures flow, not pressure) housing you have is an aftermarket one that diverts the oil flow to an oil cooler, obviously some one decided to remover the cooler. If you are going to use that housing you need to remove the plugs and connect the two openings somehow, so the oil can get through. It has been a long time since I attended the U.S. Suzuki technician training, or had access to a GS service manual, but if memory serves, all the oil for the cams and valve gear comes through that switch housing, so if the plugs are plugged, there is your major malfunction:eek1!

    You should be able to see oil flow if you crank it with that housing removed. I would get a couple of hose barbs and a short bit of hose, a couple of clamps, and give it a shot. I bet it will lube the cams fine.
    #27
  8. Skowinski

    Skowinski Eukaryote

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    Been awhile since I had my GS1000 apart, but from memory Andyinhilo's comments are spot on. That aftermarket housing diverts the oil out, through a cooler, and back into the oiling system. Pretty sure if the outlet and inlet are blocked off your oil coming from the pump stops right there and never makes it up to the head. I'm surprised the cams look as good as they do.

    I'd either connect up an oil cooler (not a bad idea if your running these bikes hard on hot days) or put a stock cover back on there.


    #28
  9. Skowinski

    Skowinski Eukaryote

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    Is that moly engine assembly grease on the cam bearing surfaces? What do they look like, smooth, polished, any scoring? If it's been run without oil to the top end I'd expect you would see the first damage there, as those are plain bearings and cannot survive long without oil.

    #29
  10. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's not as bad as it looks, especially the bearings. They look rough, but I'd guess if you were to measure it that you'd find that the finish is about a 30. The cam shaft itself feels newly ground.
    #30
  11. Skowinski

    Skowinski Eukaryote

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    From the looks of those cam bearing surfaces, I'd say they are scored, damaged. That looks, to me, just like what would be expected if a plain bearing was run without oil being fed to it.

    A few examples from my garage for comparison - Here is a plain bearing with no discernible wear, 14,000 mile engine:

    [​IMG]

    Here is one that has some polishing, but the wear is not significant, and the bearing is still ok, 35,000 mile engine:

    [​IMG]

    Hopefully someone else who has seen these types of bearings with and without damage will have a look and give their opinion.
    #31
  12. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    What's the short term and long term effects of worn plain bearings on the cam shaft?
    #32
  13. Andyinhilo

    Andyinhilo Long timer

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    Short term = noise, long term = additional wear, difficulty maintaining valve timing and clearance.

    I expect a new head would be hard to find and probably expensive. I worked in a machine shop some years ago, and we had some success with making inserts and machining the old cam bores oversize to accept them when replacement heads were not readily available or too expensive (think Ferrari GT308. Bare heads were over 5K back in 1990). That would not be cheap either, but it would give you a solution if you can find someone to do the work.

    You really have nothing to lose by closing it up and giving it a try with a hose installed in place of the pipe plugs on the adapter. Make sure it does not kink, and see what happens.
    #33
  14. Skowinski

    Skowinski Eukaryote

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    #34
  15. Andyinhilo

    Andyinhilo Long timer

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    Wow! I would not have thought that there was that much laying around, and cheap too. Good news for Triam!
    #35
  16. shakeybone

    shakeybone Been here awhile

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    Might want to check out thegsresources.com. lots of GS info and knowledge.
    #36
  17. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    Thanks for the tip. I may do that in a few months when it's too cold to ride and I have some money sitting around.
    #37
  18. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    No kidding.
    #38
  19. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    Yeah. They keep telling me that. I've got an account, but I haven't used it yet. Next time I have a problem I'll have to post it on their forum.
    #39
  20. Triam

    Triam Machinist

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    So I put the new shims in and put everything together and my shims are still out of spec. I'm worried that the lack of lube wore down the journals (I think that's what they're called) and the camshaft now had play in it. I'll check it more thoroughly tomorrow and have an update. I'll also know tomorrow if changing out the oil flow sensor fixed the problem.
    #40